9 Works

Data from: Foraging efficiency and size matching in a plant – pollinator community: the importance of sugar content and tongue length

Saskia G.T. Klumpers, Martina Stang & Peter G.L. Klinkhamer
A longstanding question in ecology is how species interactions are structured within communities. Although evolutionary theory predicts close size matching between floral nectar tube depth and pollinator proboscis length of interacting species, such size matching has seldom been shown and explained in multispecies assemblages. Here, we investigated the degree of size matching among Asteraceae and their pollinators and its relationship with foraging efficiency. The majority of pollinators, especially Hymenoptera, choose plant species on which they...

Data from: Age, state, environment and season dependence of senescence in body mass

Svenja B. Kroeger, Daniel T. Blumstein, Kenneth B. Armitage, Jane M. Reid, Julien G.A. Martin & Julien G. A. Martin
Data file in csv formatBMdata.csvRcode

Data from: Progressive sensitivity of trophic levels to warming underlies an elevational gradient in ant-aphid mutualism strength

Annika S. Nelson, Riley T. Pratt, Jessica D. Pratt, Richard Alexander Smith, Cole T. Symanski, Cathrine Prenot & Kailen A. Mooney
Although species interactions are often proposed to be stronger at lower latitudes and elevations, few studies have evaluated the mechanisms driving such patterns. In this study, we assessed whether, and by which mechanisms, abiotic changes associated with elevation altered the outcome of an ant-aphid protection mutualism. To do so, we characterized the multi-trophic interactions among the ant Formica podzolica, the aphid Aphis varians, and aphid natural enemies occurring on the plant Chamerion angustifolium within replicate...

Data from: Short-term, low-level nitrogen deposition dampens a trophic cascade between bears and plants

Joshua B. Grinath
Human activities have substantially increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition in ecosystems worldwide, often leading to higher plant quality for herbivores and greater herbivory. Predators frequently suppress herbivores and indirectly benefit plants via ‘trophic cascades’, and the strength of these interactions can also depend on N availability. However, the evidence for N deposition effects on cascades primarily comes from studies of high-level N deposition. Most terrestrial ecosystems currently receive elevated, but low-level N deposition, and it...

Data from: Why are some plant—nectar robber interactions commensalisms?

Jacob M. Heiling, Trevor A. Ledbetter, Sarah K. Richman, Heather K. Ellison, Judith L. Bronstein & Rebecca E. Irwin
Many plants that bear hidden or recessed floral nectar experience nectar robbing, the removal of nectar by a floral visitor through holes pierced in the corolla. Although robbing can reduce plant reproductive success, many studies fail to find such effects. We outline three mechanistic hypotheses that can explain when interactions between plants and nectar-robbers should be commensilistic rather than antagonistic: the non-discrimination (pollinators do not avoid robbed flowers), visitor prevalence (robber visitation is rare relative...

Data from: Coordinated species importation policies are needed to reduce serious invasions globally: the case of alien bumblebees in South America

Marcelo A. Aizen, Cecilia Smith-Ramirez, Carolina L. Morales, Lorena Vieli, Agustín Sáez, Rodrigo M. Barahona-Segovia, Marina P. Arbetman, José Montalva, Lucas A. Garibaldi, David W. Inouye & Lawrence D. Harder
The global trade of species promotes diverse human activities but also facilitates the introduction of potentially invasive species into new environments. As species ignore national boundaries, unilateral national decisions concerning species trade set the stage for transnational species invasion with significant conservation, economic and political consequences. The need for a coordinated approach to species importation policies is demonstrated by the introduction of two bumblebee species into Chile for crop pollination, despite Argentina banning commercial importation...

Data from: Microenvironment and functional-trait context dependence predict alpine plant community dynamics

Benjamin Blonder, Rozalia E. Kapas, Rebecca M. Dalton, Bente J. Graae, Jacob M. Heiling & Øystein H. Opedal
Predicting the structure and dynamics of communities is difficult. Approaches linking functional traits to niche boundaries, species co‐occurrence and demography are promising, but have so far had limited success. We hypothesized that predictability in community ecology could be improved by incorporating more accurate measures of fine‐scale environmental heterogeneity and the context‐dependent function of traits. We tested these hypotheses using long term whole‐community demography data from an alpine plant community in Colorado. Species distributions along microenvironmental...

Data from: Phenological responses to multiple environmental drivers under climate change: insights from a long-term observational study and a manipulative field experiment

Susana M. Wadgymar, Jane E. Ogilvie, David W. Inouye, Arthur E. Weis & Jill T. Anderson
• Climate change has induced pronounced shifts in the reproductive phenology of plants, yet we know little about which environmental factors contribute to interspecific variation in responses and their effects on fitness. • We integrate data from a 43-year record of first flowering for six species in subalpine Colorado meadows with a 3-year snow manipulation experiment on the perennial forb Boechera stricta (Brassicaceae) from the same site. We analyze shifts in the onset of flowering...

Data from: Cumulative reproductive costs on current reproduction in a wild polytocous mammal

Svenja B. Kroeger, Daniel T. Blumstein, Kenneth B. Armitage, Jane M. Reid, Julien G.A. Martin & Julien G. A. Martin
The cumulative cost of reproduction hypothesis predicts that reproductive costs accumulate over an individual’s reproductive lifespan. While short-term costs have been extensively explored, the prevalence of cumulative long-term costs and the circumstances under which such costs occur alongside or instead of short-term costs, are far from clear. Indeed, few studies have simultaneously tested for both short-term and cumulative long-term reproductive costs in natural populations. Even in mammals, comparatively little is known about cumulative effects of...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory
    9
  • University of Kansas
    2
  • University of California System
    2
  • University of Aberdeen
    2
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    2
  • Florida State University
    2
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • Leiden University
    1
  • University Austral de Chile
    1