11 Works

Data from: Sex-specific differences in the response of prey to predation risk

Sarah Donelan & Geoffrey Trussell
The nonconsumptive effects of predation risk can strongly affect prey behavior and fitness with emergent effects on community structure and ecosystem functioning. Prey may respond differently to predation risk based on key traits such as sex, but the influence of sex-specific variation is typically explored in species with strong sexual dimorphism. However, sex-specific responses to predation risk may arise even in prey species lacking sexual dimorphisms based on differences in the relative cost of reproduction....

Primary detection records for aquatic nonindigenous species in global estuarine and marine ecosystems and the Great Lakes

Sarah Bailey, Lyndsay Brown, Marnie Campbell, João Canning-Clode, James Carlton, Nuno Castro, Paula Chainho, Farrah Chan, Joel Creed, Amelia Curd, John Darling, Paul Fofonoff, Bella Galil, Chad Hewitt, Graeme Inglis, Inti Keith, Nicholas Mandrak, Agnese Marchini, Cynthia McKenzie, Anna Occhipinti-Ambrogi, Henn Ojaveer, Larissa Pires-Teixeira, Tamara Robinson, Gregory Ruiz, Kimberley Seaward … & Aibin Zhan
Aim The introduction of aquatic non-indigenous species (ANS) has become a major driver for global changes in species biogeography. We examined spatial patterns and temporal trends of ANS detections since 1965 to inform conservation policy and management. Location Global Methods We assembled an extensive dataset of first records of detection of ANS (1965-2015) across 49 aquatic ecosystems, including the i) year of first collection, ii) population status and iii) potential pathway(s) of introduction. Data were...

Foliar water uptake by coastal wetland plants: a novel water acquisition mechanism in arid and humid subtropical mangroves

Matthew Hayes, Samantha Chapman, Amber Jesse, Elizabeth O'Brien, Adam Langley, Remi Bardou, John Devaney, John Parker & Kyle C. Cavanaugh
1. Climate change alters freshwater availability in many ecosystems leading to shifts in distributions for many plants. Despite living exclusively in intertidal, saline environments, mangroves rely on non-saline water to maintain plant productivity. However, several mangrove species persist in arid environments where non-saline water from rain and groundwater sources are limited. Under these conditions, foliar water uptake from fog and mist may be an important water acquisition strategy. 2. We conducted a field experiment in...

Reduced avian body condition due to global warming has little reproductive or population consequences

Nina McLean, Henk Van Der Jeugd, Chris Van Turnhout, Jonathan Lefcheck & Martijn Van De Pol
Climate change has strong effects on traits such as phenology and physiology. Studies typically assume that climate-induced trait changes will have consequences for population dynamics, but explicit tests are rare. Body condition reflects energy storage and may directly affect how much can be invested in reproduction and survival. However, the causal pathway by which decreased body condition impacts population dynamics has never been quantified across multiple populations and species. Therefore, we lack a general understanding...

Data from: Chemical novelty facilitates herbivore resistance and biological invasions in some introduced plant species

Brian Sedio, John Devaney, Jamie Pullen, Geoffrey Parker, S. Joseph Wright & John Parker
Ecological release from herbivory due to chemical novelty is commonly predicted to facilitate biological invasions by plants, but has not been tested on a community scale. We used metabolomics based on mass spectrometry molecular networks to assess the novelty of foliar secondary chemistry of 15 invasive plant species compared to 46 native species at a site in eastern North America. Locally, invasive species were more chemically distinctive than natives. Among the 15 invasive species, the...

Data from: Microgeography, not just latitude, drives climate overlap on mountains from tropical to polar ecosystems

David H. Klinges & Brett R. Scheffers
An extension of the climate variability hypothesis is that relatively stable climate, such as that of the tropics, induces distinct thermal bands across elevation that render dispersal over tropical mountains difficult compared to temperate mountains. Yet, ecosystems are not thermally static in space-time, especially at small scales, which might render some mountains greater thermal isolators than others. Here, we provide an extensive investigation of temperature drivers from fine to coarse scales, and demonstrate that the...

Dominant native and non-native graminoids differ in key leaf traits irrespective of nutrient availability

Arthur Broadbent, Jennifer Firn, James McGree, Elizabeth Borer, Yvonne Buckley, W. Stanley Harpole, Kimberly Komatsu, Andrew MacDougall, Kate Orwin, Nicholas Ostle, Eric Seabloom, Jonathan Bakker, Lori Biedermann, Maria Caldeira, Nico Eisenhauer, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Joslin Moore, Carla Nogueira, Pablo Peri, Anita Risch, Christiane Roscher, Martin Schuetz & Carly Stevens
Aim Nutrient enrichment is associated with plant invasions and biodiversity loss. Functional trait advantages may predict the ascendancy of invasive plants following nutrient enrichment but this is rarely tested. Here, we investigate 1) whether dominant native and non-native plants differ in important morphological and physiological leaf traits, 2) how their traits respond to nutrient addition, and 3) whether responses are consistent across functional groups. Location Australia, Europe, North America and South Africa Time period 2007...

Data from: Hurricanes overcome migration lag and shape intraspecific genetic variation beyond a poleward mangrove range limit

John Paul Kennedy, Emily M. Dangremond, Matthew A. Hayes, Richard F. Preziosi, Jennifer K. Rowntree & Ilka C. Feller
Expansion of many tree species lags behind climate-change projections. Extreme storms can rapidly overcome this lag, especially for coastal species, but how will storm-driven expansion shape intraspecific genetic variation? Do storms provide recruits only from the nearest sources, or from more distant sources? Answers to these questions have ecological and evolutionary implications, but empirical evidence is absent from the literature. Hurricane Irma provided an opportunity to address this knowledge gap at the northern range limit...

Is the central-marginal hypothesis a general rule? Evidence from three distributions of an expanding mangrove species, Avicennia germinans (L.) L.

John Paul Kennedy, Richard Preziosi, Jennifer Rowntree & Ilka Feller
The central-marginal hypothesis (CMH) posits that range margins exhibit less genetic diversity and greater inter-population genetic differentiation compared to range cores. CMH predictions are based on long-held ‘abundant-centre’ assumptions of a decline in ecological conditions and abundances towards range margins. Although much empirical research has confirmed CMH, exceptions remain almost as common. We contend that mangroves provide a model system to test CMH that alleviates common confounding factors and may help clarify this lack of...

Strong genetic structure in a widespread estuarine crab: A test of potential versus realized dispersal

Carolyn Tepolt, April Blakeslee, Amy Fowler, John Darling, Mark Torchin, Whitman Miller & Gregory Ruiz
Aim: Genetic structure has proven difficult to predict for marine and estuarine species with multi-day pelagic larval durations, since many disperse far less than expected based on passive transport models. In such cases, the gap between potential and realized dispersal may result from larval behaviors that evolved to facilitate retention and settlement in favorable environments. Behavior is predicted to play a particularly key role in structuring truly estuarine species, which often moderate their behavior to...

Data from: With a little help from my friends – Physiological integration facilitates invasion of wetland grass Elymus athericus into flooded soils

Peter Mueller, Hai T. Do, Christian Smit, Christoph Reisdorff, Kai Jensen & Stefanie Nolte
Tidal wetlands worldwide are undergoing rapid invasions by tall-growing clonal grasses. Prominent examples are invasions by species of the genera Spartina, Phragmites, and Elymus. The responsible physiological and ecological drivers of these invasions are poorly understood. Physiological integration (PI) is a key trait of clonal plants, which enables the exchange of resources among ramets. We investigated PI in Elymus athericus, which has been rapidly spreading from high-marsh into low-marsh environments of European salt marshes during...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    11

Affiliations

  • Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
    11
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2
  • Manchester Metropolitan University
    2
  • Griffith University
    2
  • Trinity College Dublin
    2
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    2
  • Environmental Protection Agency
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1