12 Works

Data from: Microbe biogeography tracks water masses in a dynamic oceanic frontal system

Anni Djurhuus, Philipp H. Boersch-Supan, Svein-Ole Mikalsen, Alex D. Rogers & Helge-Ansgar Giebel
PLEASE NOTE, THESE DATA ARE ALSO REFERRED TO IN ANOTHER PUBLICATION. PLEASE SEE http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.160829. Dispersal limitation, not just environmental selection, plays an important role in microbial biogeography. The distance–decay relationship is thought to be weak in habitats where dispersal is high, such as in the pelagic environment, where ocean currents facilitate microbial dispersal. Most studies of microbial community composition to date have observed little geographical heterogeneity on a regional scale (100 km). We present a...

Data from: Changing measurements or changing movements? Sampling scale and movement model identifiability across generations of biologging technology

Leah R. Johnson, Philipp H. Boersch-Supan, Richard A. Phillips & Sadie J. Ryan
1. Animal movement patterns contribute to our understanding of variation in breeding success and survival of individuals, and the implications for population dynamics. 2. Over time, sensor technology for measuring movement patterns has improved. Although older technologies may be rendered obsolete, the existing data are still valuable, especially if new and old data can be compared to test whether a behavior has changed over time. 3. We used simulated data to assess the ability to...

Data from: Costs of immunity and their role in the range expansion of the house sparrow in Kenya

Lynn B. Martin, Holly J. Kilvitis, Amber J. Brace, Laken Cooper, Mark F. Haussmann, Alex Mutati, Vincent Fasanello, Sara O'Brien & Daniel R. Ardia
There are at least two reasons to study traits that mediate successful range expansions. First, dispersers will found new populations and thus impact the distribution and evolution of species. Second, organisms moving into new areas will influence the fate of resident communities, directly competing with or indirectly affecting residents by spreading non-native or spilling-back native parasites. The success of invaders in new areas is likely mediated by a counterbalancing of costly traits. In new areas...

Data from: Local and regional stressors interact to drive a salinization-induced outbreak of predators on oyster reefs

David L. Kimbro, J. Wilson White, Hanna Tillotson, Nikkie Cox, Megan Christopher, Owen Stokes-Cawley, Samantha Yuan, Tim J. Pusack, Christopher D. Stallings & Timothy J. Pusack
Predator outbreaks are predicted to increasingly decimate economically and ecologically important prey populations because global climate change and food-web modifications frequently facilitate predators and stress prey. Natural systems are organized hierarchically, with processes operating at multiple scales giving rise to patterns of biodiversity, so predicting and managing outbreaks requires a framework that accounts for the effects of both local and regional stressors. Here, we used the comparative experimental approach to investigate whether the collapse of...

Data from: The diverse dietary profiles of MIS 3 cave bears from the Romanian Carpathians: insights from stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) analysis

Marius Robu, Jonathan G. Wynn, Ionuţ C. Mirea, Alexandru Petculescu, Marius Kenesz, Cristina M. Puşcaş, Marius Vlaicu, Erik Trinkaus & Silviu Constantin
Late Pleistocene European cave bears (Ursus spelaeus) have been considered to be largely vegetarian, although stable isotope data (δ13C and δ15N values) from the Romanian Carpathians has suggested considerable dietary variation. Here we evaluate previous and additional adult cave bear isotopic data from four Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3) sites in the Carpathians. Peştera Urşilor (N = 35), Peştera Cioclovina (N = 32), Peştera Muierilor (N = 8), and Peştera cu Oase (N =...

Data from: Competition drives trait evolution and character displacement between Mimulus species along an environmental gradient

Nicholas J. Kooyers, Brooke James & Benjamin K. Blackman
Closely related species may evolve to coexist stably in sympatry through niche differentiation driven by in situ competition, a process termed character displacement. Alternatively, past evolution in allopatry may have already sufficiently reduced niche overlap to permit establishment in sympatry, a process called ecological sorting. The relative importance of each process to niche differentiation is contentious even though they are not mutually exclusive and are both mediated via multivariate trait evolution. We explore how competition...

Data from: Stress hormones predict a host superspreader phenotype in the West Nile virus system

Stephanie S. Gervasi, Sarah C. Burgan, Erik Hofmeister, Thomas R. Unnasch & Lynn B. Martin
Glucocorticoid stress hormones, such as corticosterone (CORT), have profound effects on the behaviour and physiology of organisms, and thus have the potential to alter host competence and the contributions of individuals to population- and community-level pathogen dynamics. For example, CORT could alter the rate of contacts among hosts, pathogens and vectors through its widespread effects on host metabolism and activity levels. CORT could also affect the intensity and duration of pathogen shedding and risk of...

Data from: Range-wide and regional patterns of population structure and genetic diversity in the gopher tortoise

Daniel Gaillard, Joshua R. Ennen, Brian R. Kreiser, Carl P. Qualls, Sarah C. Sweat, Roger Birkhead, Tracey D. Tuberville, Matthew Aresco, Earl D. McCoy, Henry R. Mushinsky, Thomas W. Hentges, B.R. Kreiser, C.P. Qualls, T.D. Tuberville, E.D. McCoy, H.R. Mushinsky & T.W. Hentges
The gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) has experienced dramatic population declines throughout its distribution in the southeastern United States and is federally listed as threatened in the area west of the Tombigbee-Mobile Rivers. While there is molecular support for recognizing the listed portion of the range as genetically distinct, other research has suggested that additional population structure exists at both range-wide and regional scales. In this study, we sought to comprehensively define structure at both spatial...

Data from: Genetic and epigenetic variation in Spartina alterniflora following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Marta Robertson, Aaron Schrey, Ashley Shayter, Christina J. Moss & Christina Richards
Catastrophic events offer unique opportunities to study rapid population response to stress in natural settings. In concert with genetic variation, epigenetic mechanisms like DNA methylation may offer a mechanism of rapid response to organisms facing severe environmental challenges, and contribute to the high resilience of species like Spartina alterniflora, a foundation salt marsh grass which shows resilience to strong environmental disturbance. In 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill devastated large portions of the coastline along...

Data from: Mapping tropical dry forest succession using multiple criteria spectral mixture analysis

Sen Cao, Qiuyan Yu, Arturo Sanchez-Azofeifa, Jilu Feng, Benoit Rivard & Zhujun Gu
Tropical dry forests (TDFs) in the Americas are considered the first frontier of economic development with less than 1% of their total original coverage under protection. Accordingly, accurate estimates of their spatial extent, fragmentation, and degree of regeneration are critical in evaluating the success of current conservation policies. This study focused on a well-protected secondary TDF in Santa Rosa National Park (SRNP) Environmental Monitoring Super Site, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We used spectral signature analysis of...

Data from: Dietary niche variation and its relationship to lizard population density

Maria Novosolov, Gordon H. Rodda, Alison M. Gainsbury & Shai Meiri
(1) Insular species are predicted to broaden their niches, in response to having fewer competitors. They can thus exploit a greater proportion of the resource spectrum. In turn, broader niches are hypothesized to facilitate (or be a consequence of) increased population densities. (2) We tested whether insular lizards have broader dietary niches than mainland species, how it relates to competitor and predator richness, and the nature of the relationship between population density and dietary niche...

Data from: Using multi-response models to investigate pathogen coinfections across scales: insights from emerging diseases of amphibians

William E. Stutz, Andrew R. Blaustein, Cheryl J. Briggs, Jason T. Hoverman, Jason R. Rhor & Pieter T. J. Johnson
1.Associations among parasites affect many aspects of host-parasite dynamics, but a lack of analytical tools has limited investigations of parasite correlations in observational data that are often nested across spatial and biological scales. 2.Here we illustrate how hierarchical, multiresponse modeling can characterize parasite associations by allowing for hierarchical structuring, offering estimates of uncertainty, and incorporating correlational model structures. After introducing the general approach, we apply this framework to investigate coinfections among four amphibian parasites (the...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • University of South Florida
    12
  • Oregon State University
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • Bucknell University
    1
  • University of California System
    1
  • University of Cologne
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • University of Virginia
    1
  • University of Alberta
    1
  • Monell Chemical Senses Center
    1