33 Works

Data from: Effects of plant functional group loss on soil biota and net ecosystem exchange: a plant removal experiment in the Mongolian grassland

Dima Chen, Qingmin Pan, Yongfei Bai, Shuijin Hu, Jianhui Huang, Qibing Wang, Shahid Naeem, James J. Elser, Jianguo Wu & Xingguo Han
1. The rapid loss of global biodiversity can greatly affect the functioning of above-ground components of ecosystems. However, how such biodiversity losses affect below-ground communities and linkages to soil carbon (C) sequestration is unclear. Here we describe how losses in plant functional groups (PFGs) affect soil microbial and nematode communities and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in a 4-year removal experiment conducted on the Mongolian plateau, the world's largest remaining natural grassland. 2. Our results demonstrated...

Data from: Bayesian morphological clock methods resurrect placoderm monophyly and reveal rapid early evolution in jawed vertebrates

Benedict King, Tuo Qiao, Michael S. Y. Lee, Min Zhu & John A. Long
The phylogeny of early gnathostomes provides an important framework for understanding one of the most significant evolutionary events, the origin and diversification of jawed vertebrates. A series of recent cladistic analyses have suggested that the placoderms, an extinct group of armoured fish, form a paraphyletic group basal to all other jawed vertebrates. We revised and expanded this morphological data set, most notably by sampling autapomorphies in a similar way to parsimony-informative traits, thus ensuring this...

Data from: Atmospheric deposition exposes Qinling pandas to toxic pollutants

Yi-Ping Chen, Ying-Juan Zheng, Qiang Liu, Yi Song, Zhi-Sheng An, Qing-Yi Ma & Aaron M. Ellison
The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered animals in the world, and it is recognized worldwide as a symbol for conservation. A previous study showed that wild and captive pandas, especially those of the Qinling subspecies, were exposed to toxicants in their diet of bamboo; the ultimate origin of these toxicants is unknown. Here we show that atmospheric deposition is the most likely origin of heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants...

Data from: Indications for three independent domestication events for the tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) and new insights into the origin of tea germplasm in China and India revealed by nuclear microsatellites

M. K. Meegahakumbura, M. Wambulwa, K. K. Thapa, M. M. Li, M. Möller, J.C. Xu, J.B. Yang, B.Y. Liu, S. Ranjitkar, J. Liu, D.Z. Li, L.M. Gao, M. C. Wambulwa, D. Z. Li, L. M. Gao, J. B. Yang & J. C. Xu
Background: Tea is the world’s most popular non-alcoholic beverage. China and India are known to be the largest tea producing countries and recognized as the centers for the domestication of the tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze). However, molecular studies on the origin, domestication and relationships of the main teas, China type, Assam type and Cambod type are lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings: Twenty-three nuclear microsatellite markers were used to investigate the genetic diversity, relatedness, and...

Data from: Limitations of species delimitation based on phylogenetic analyses: a case study in the (Hypogymnia hypotrypa) group (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota)

Xinli Wei, Bruce McCune, H. Thorsten Lumbsch, Hui Li, Steven Leavitt, Yoshikazu Yamamoto, Svetlana Tchabanenko & Jiangchun Wei
Delimiting species boundaries among closely related lineages often requires a range of independent data sets and analytical approaches. Similar to other organismal groups, robust species circumscriptions in fungi are increasingly investigated within an empirical framework. Here we attempt to delimit species boundaries in a closely related clade of lichen-forming fungi endemic to Asia, the Hypogymnia hypotrypa group (Parmeliaceae). In the current classification, the Hypogymnia hypotrypa group includes two species: H. hypotrypa and H. flavida, which...

Data from: Little white lies: pericarp color provides insights into the origins and evolution of Southeast Asian weedy rice

Yongxia Cui, Beng Kah Song, Lin-Feng Li, Ya-Ling Li, Zhongyun Huang, Ana L. Caicedo, Yulin Jia & Kenneth M. Olsen
Weedy rice is a conspecific form of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) that infests rice fields and results in severe crop losses. Weed strains in different world regions appear to have originated multiple times from different domesticated and/or wild rice progenitors. In the case of Malaysian weedy rice, a multiple-origin model has been proposed based on neutral markers and analyses of domestication genes for hull color and seed shattering. Here we examined variation in pericarp...

Data from: Divergence maintained by climatic selection despite recurrent gene flow: a case study of Castanopsis carlesii (Fagaceae)

Ye Sun, Yann Surget-Groba & Shaoxiong Gao
Local adaptation to different environments has the potential to maintain divergence between populations despite recurrent gene flow and is an important driver for generating biological diversity. In this study, we investigate the role of adaptation in the maintenance of two parapatric varieties of a forest tree. We used sequence variation of chloroplastic DNA and restriction site-associated DNA to investigate the genetic structure of two varieties of Castanopsis carlesii in subtropical China and relate it to...

Data from: Plant diversity accurately predicts insect diversity in two tropical landscapes

Kai Zhang, Siliang Lin, Yinqiu Ji, Chenxue Yang, Xiaoyang Wang, Chunyan Yang, Hesheng Wang, Haisheng Jiang, Rhett D. Harrison & Douglas W. Yu
Plant diversity surely determines arthropod diversity, but only moderate correlations between arthropod and plant species richness had been observed until Basset et al. (Science, 338, 2012 and 1481) finally undertook an unprecedentedly comprehensive sampling of a tropical forest and demonstrated that plant species richness could indeed accurately predict arthropod species richness. We now require a high-throughput pipeline to operationalize this result so that we can (i) test competing explanations for tropical arthropod megadiversity, (ii) improve...

Data from: Patterns and thresholds of grazing-induced changes in community structure and ecosystem functioning: species-level responses and the critical role of species traits

Wenhuai Li, Fengwei Xu, Shuxia Zheng, Friedhelm Taube & Yongfei Bai
Overgrazing has resulted in widespread decline in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in grasslands worldwide in recent decades. However, few studies have examined the patterns and thresholds of grazing-induced changes in community structure and ecosystem functioning along a grazing gradient and based on species-level responses and plant functional traits. To identify the thresholds of grazing intensity at both species and community levels, we conducted a grazing manipulation experiment with seven levels of grazing intensity (0–9 sheep...

Data from: Remotely sensed data informs red list evaluations and conservation priorities in southeast Asia

Binbin V. Li, Alice C. Hughs, Clinton N. Jenkins, Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela, Stuart L. Pimm & Alice C. Hughes
The IUCN Red List has assessed the global distributions of the majority of the world’s amphibians, birds and mammals. Yet these assessments lack explicit reference to widely available, remotely-sensed data that can sensibly inform a species’ risk of extinction. Our first goal is to add additional quantitative data to the existing standardised process that IUCN employs. Secondly, we ask: do our results suggest species of concern—those at considerably greater risk than hitherto appreciated? Thirdly, these...

Data from: Physiological regulation and efficient xylem water transport regulate diurnal water and carbon balances of tropical lianas

Ya-Jun Chen, Stefan A. Schnitzer, Yong-Jiang Zhang, Ze-Xin Fan, Guillermo Goldstein, Kyle W. Tomlinson, Hua Lin, Jiao-Lin Zhang & Kun-Fang Cao
Tropical lianas deploy most of their leaves towards the top of the forest canopy, whereas trees exhibit a more stratified crown. Forest canopies are often exposed to hot and windy conditions, and how lianas cope with the extremely high transpirational demands under these environments remains unknown. We investigated stem hydraulic properties, leaf drought tolerance, diurnal changes in leaf and stem water potentials (Ψleaf and Ψstem), stomatal conductance (gs), photosynthetic rate, sap flow and stem native...

Data from: Pollinator sharing and gene flow among closely related sympatric dioecious fig taxa

Gang Wang, Charles H. Cannon & Jin Chen
Hybridization and insect pollination are widely believed to increase rates of plant diversification. The extreme diversity of figs (Ficus) and their obligate pollinators, fig wasps (Agaonidae), provides an opportunity to examine the possible role of pollinator-mediated hybridization in plant diversification. Increasing evidence suggests that pollinator sharing and hybridization occurs among fig taxa, despite relatively strict co-evolution with the pollinating wasp. Using five sympatric dioecious fig taxa and their pollinators, we examine the degree of pollinator...

Data from: Can intercropping with the world’s three major beverage plants help improve the water use of rubber trees?

Junen Wu, Wenjie Liu & Chunfeng Chen
The dramatic expansion of rubber plantations in mainland South-East Asia and south-west China has caused many eco-environmental problems, especially negative hydrological consequences. These problems have gradually worsened and pose formidable threats to rubber agriculture, especially in the light of increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Although rubber-based agroforestry systems are regarded as the best solution for improving the sustainability of rubber agriculture and environmental conservation, plant water use and related interactions have rarely been examined in...

Data from: Asymmetric sensitivity of ecosystem carbon and water processes in response to precipitation change in a semi-arid steppe

Bingwei Zhang, Xingru Tan, Shanshan Wang, Minling Chen, Shiping Chen, Tingting Ren, Jianyang Xia, Yongfei Bai, Jianhui Huang & Xingguo Han
Semi-arid ecosystems play an important role in regulating the dynamics of the global terrestrial CO2 sink. These dynamics are mainly driven by increasing inter-annual precipitation variability. However, how ecosystem carbon processes respond to changes in precipitation is not well understood, due to a lack of substantial experimental evidence that combines increased and decreased precipitation treatments. This study, a 3-year field manipulation experiment with five precipitation levels conducted in a semi-arid steppe, examined the impacts of...

Data from: The neuroendocrine immunomodulatory axis-like pathway mediated by circulating haemocytes in pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

Zhaoqun Liu, Zhi Zhou, Qiufen Jiang, Lingling Wang, Qilin Yi, Limei Qiu & Linsheng Song
The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of host. In this study, a neuroendocrine immunomodulatory axis (NIA)-like pathway mediated by the nervous system and haemocytes was characterized in the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Once invaded pathogen was recognized by the host, the nervous system would temporally release neurotransmitters to modulate the immune response. Instead of acting passively, oyster haemocytes were able to mediate neuronal immunomodulation promptly...

Data from: Honey bees modulate their olfactory learning in the presence of hornet predators and alarm component

Zhengwei Wang, Yufeng Qu, Shihao Dong, Ping Wen, Jianjun Li, Ken Tan & Randolf Menzel
In Southeast Asia the native honey bee species Apis cerana is often attacked by hornets (Vespa velutina), mainly in the period from April to November. During the co-evolution of these two species honey bees have developed several strategies to defend themselves such as learning the odors of hornets and releasing alarm components to inform other mates. However, so far little is known about whether and how honey bees modulate their olfactory learning in the presence...

Data from: Environment not dispersal limitation drives clonal composition of arctic Daphnia in a recently deglaciated area

Tsegazeabe Hadush Haileselasie, Joachim Mergeay, Lawrence J. Weider, Ruben Sommaruga, Thomas A. Davidson, Mariana Meerhoff, Hartmut Arndt, Klaus Jürgens, Erik Jeppesen & Luc De Meester
One of the most prominent manifestations of the ongoing climate warming is the retreat of glaciers and ice sheets around the world. Retreating glaciers result in the formation of new ponds and lakes, which are available for colonization. The gradual appearance of these new habitat patches allows us to determine to what extent the composition of asexual Daphnia (water flea) populations is affected by environmental drivers versus dispersal limitation. Here we used a landscape genetics...

Data from: Thyroid hormone modulates offspring sex ratio in a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination

Bao-Jun Sun, Teng Li, Yi Mu, Jessica K. McGlashan, Arthur Georges, Richard Shine & Wei-Guo Du
The adaptive significance of temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) has attracted a great deal of research, but the underlying mechanisms by which temperature determines the sex of a developing embryo remain poorly understood. Here, we manipulated the level of a thyroid hormone (TH), triiodothyronine (T3), during embryonic development (by adding excess T3 to the eggs of the red-eared slider turtle Trachemys scripta, a reptile with TSD), to test two competing hypotheses on the proximate basis for...

Data from: Genetic variation in bitter taste receptor genes influences the foraging behavior of plateau zokor (Eospalax baileyi)

Fang Zhao, Tongzuo Zhang, Jiuxiang Xie, Shoudong Zhang, Eviatar Nevo, Jianping Su & Gonghua Lin
The ability to detect bitter tastes is important for animals; it can help them to avoid ingesting harmful substances. Bitter taste perception is mainly mediated by bitter taste receptor proteins, which are encoded by members of the Tas2r gene family and vary with the dietary preference of a specific species. Although individuals with different genotypes differ in bitterness recognition capability, little is known about the relationship between genetic variation and food selection tendencies at the...

Data from: Spatial variation of soil respiration in a cropland under winter wheat and summer maize rotation in the North China Plain

Ni H. Huang, Li Wang, Yongsen Hu, Haifeng Tian & Zheng Niu
Spatial variation of soil respiration (Rs) in cropland ecosystems must be assessed to evaluate the global terrestrial carbon budget. This study aims to explore the spatial characteristics and controlling factors of Rs in a cropland under winter wheat and summer maize rotation in the North China Plain. We collected Rs data from 23 sample plots in the cropland. At the late jointing stage, the daily mean Rs of summer maize (4.74 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1)...

Data from: Greenhouse gas emissions from reservoir water surfaces: a new global synthesis

Bridget R. Deemer, John A. Harrison, Siyue Li, Jake J. Beaulieu, Tonya DelSontro, Nathan Barros, José F. Bezerra-Neto, Stephen M. Powers, Marco A. Dos Santos & J. Arie Vonk
Collectively, reservoirs created by dams are thought to be an important source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere. So far, efforts to quantify, model, and manage these emissions have been limited by data availability and inconsistencies in methodological approach. Here, we synthesize reservoir CH4, CO2, and N2O emission data with three main objectives: (1) to generate a global estimate of GHG emissions from reservoirs, (2) to identify the best predictors of these emissions, and...

Data from: Akt-mTORC1 signaling regulates Acly to integrate metabolic input to control of macrophage activation

Anthony J. Covarrubias, Halil Ibrahim Aksoylar, Jiujiu Yu, Nathaniel W. Snyder, Andrew J. Worth, Shankar S. Iyer, Jiawei Wang, Issam Ben-Sahra, Vanessa Byles, Tiffany Polynne-Stapornkul, Erika C. Espinosa, Dudley Lamming, Brendan D. Manning, Yijing Zhang, Ian A. Blair & Tiffany Horng
Macrophage activation/polarization to distinct functional states is critically supported by metabolic shifts. How polarizing signals coordinate metabolic and functional reprogramming, and the potential implications for control of macrophage activation, remains poorly understood. Here we show that IL-4 signaling co-opts the Akt-mTORC1 pathway to regulate Acly, a key enzyme in Ac-CoA synthesis, leading to increased histone acetylation and M2 gene induction. Only a subset of M2 genes is controlled in this way, including those regulating cellular...

Data from: Developmental biology of the early Cambrian cnidarian Olivooides

Xi-Ping Dong, Kelly Vargas, John A. Cunningham, Huaqiao Zhang, Teng Liu, Fang Chen, Jianbo Liu, Stefan Bengtson & Philip C. J. Donoghue
Fossilized embryos afford direct insight into the pattern of development in extinct organisms, providing unique tests of hypotheses of developmental evolution based in comparative embryology. However, these fossils can only be effective in this role if their embryology and phylogenetic affinities are well constrained. We elucidate and interpret the development of Olivooides from embryonic and adult stages and use these data to discriminate among competing interpretations of their anatomy and affinity. The embryology of Olivooides...

Data from: Bees eavesdrop upon informative and persistent signal compounds in alarm pheromones

Zhengwei Wang, Ping Wen, Yufeng Qu, Shihao Dong, Jianjun Li, Ken Tan & James C. Nieh
Pollinators such as bees provide a critical ecosystem service that can be impaired by information about predation. We provide the first evidence for olfactory eavesdropping and avoidance of heterospecific alarm signals, alarm pheromones, at food sources in bees. We predicted that foragers would eavesdrop upon heterospecific alarm pheromones, and would detect and avoid conspicuous individual pheromone compounds, defined by abundance and how long they can linger to provide warning information (volatility). We show that Apis...

Data from: Tree phylogenetic diversity promotes host–parasitoid interactions

Michael Staab, Helge Bruelheide, Walter Durka, Stefan Michalski, Oliver Purschke, Chao-Dong Zhu & Alexandra-Maria Klein
Evidence from grassland experiments suggests that a plant community's phylogenetic diversity (PD) is a strong predictor of ecosystem processes, even stronger than species richness per se. This has, however, never been extended to species-rich forests and host–parasitoid interactions. We used cavity-nesting Hymenoptera and their parasitoids collected in a subtropical forest as a model system to test whether hosts, parasitoids, and their interactions are influenced by tree PD and a comprehensive set of environmental variables, including...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    33

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    33

Affiliations

  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    33
  • University of Chinese Academy of Sciences
    14
  • Kunming Institute of Botany
    2
  • Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh
    2
  • Zoological Society of London
    2
  • University of Amsterdam
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • Wonkwang University
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • Coconut Research Institute
    1