330 Works

Anza Borehole Experiment

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Set of 100 meter deep short period borehole seismometers located along the Anza section of the San Jacinto Fault Zone

Sea-level rise will drive divergent sediment transport patterns on fore reefs and reef flats, potentially causing erosion on Atoll Islands

James Bramante, Andrew D. Ashton, Curt D. Storlazzi, Olivia M. Cheriton & Jeffrey P. Donnelly
Atoll reef islands primarily consist of unconsolidated sediment, and their ocean-facing shorelines are maintained by sediment produced and transported across their reefs. Changes in incident waves can alter cross-shore sediment exchange and thus affect the sediment budget and morphology of atoll reef islands. Here we investigate the influence of sea-level rise and projected wave climate change on wave characteristics and cross-shore sediment transport across an atoll reef at Kwajalein Island, Republic of the Marshall Islands....

Supporting information and data for \"Chapter 1: Constraining Hydraulic Permeability at Great Depth by Using Magnetotellurics\" in Pepin JD (2019) New Approaches to Geothermal Resource Exploration and Characterization (PhD dissertation)

Jeff D. Pepin, Mark A. Person, Shari A. Kelley, Jared R. Peacock & Jesus D. Gomez-Valez
This supporting information includes additional text, figures, and tables regarding the newly derived sodium-chloride fluid resistivity model and the magnetotelluric (MT) inversion methodology. It also includes additional simulated electrical resistivity results that are not explicitly presented in the main text; the three simulations featured in the main text are selected to represent this larger set of simulations. Six supporting datasets are also described in this document. The first is a compilation of previously published laboratory-measured...

Data from: Genotyping-by-sequencing illuminates high levels of divergence among sympatric forms of coregonines in the Laurentian Great Lakes

Amanda Ackiss, Wesley Larson & Wendylee Stott
Effective resource management depends on our ability to partition diversity into biologically meaningful units. Recent evolutionary divergence, however, can often lead to ambiguity in morphological and genetic differentiation, complicating the delineation of valid conservation units. Such is the case with the “coregonine problem,” where recent post-glacial radiations of coregonines into lacustrine habitats resulted in the evolution of numerous species flocks, often with ambiguous taxonomy. The application of genomics methods is beginning to shed light on...

Data from: Tropical understory herbaceous community responds more strongly to hurricane disturbance than to experimental warming

Deborah Kennard, David Matlaga, Joanne Sharpe, Clay King, Aura Alonso-Rodríguez, Sasha Reed, Molly Cavaleri & Tana Wood
The effects of climate change on tropical forests may have global consequences due to the forests’ high biodiversity and major role in the global carbon cycle. In this study, we document the effects of experimental warming on the abundance and composition of a tropical forest floor herbaceous plant community in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. This study was conducted within Tropical Responses to Altered Climate Experiment (TRACE) plots, which use infrared heaters under free-air,...

Supplementary information for integrating sequence capture and restriction-site associated DNA sequencing to resolve recent radiations of Pelagic seabirds

Joan Ferrer-Obiol, Helen F. James, R. Terry Chesser, Vincent Bretagnolle, Jacob González-Solís, Julio Rozas, Marta Riutort & Andreanna J. Welch
The diversification of modern birds has been shaped by a number of radiations. Rapid diversification events make reconstructing the evolutionary relationships among taxa challenging due to the convoluted effects of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) and introgression. Phylogenomic datasets have the potential to detect patterns of phylogenetic incongruence, and to address their causes. However, the footprints of ILS and introgression on sequence data can vary between different phylogenomic markers at different phylogenetic scales depending on factors...

Data from: A food web including parasites for kelp forests of the Santa Barbara Channel, California

Dana Morton, Cristiana Antonino, Farallon Broughton, Dykman Lauren, Armand Kuris & Kevin Lafferty
We built a high-resolution topological food web for the kelp forests of the Santa Barbara Channel, California, USA that includes parasites and significantly improves resolution compared to previous webs. The 1,098 nodes and 21,956 links in the web describe an economically, socially, and ecologically vital system. Nodes are broken into life-stages. There are 549 free-living life-stages (comprising 492 species from 21 Phyla) and 549 parasitic life-stages (comprising 450 species from 10 Phyla). Links represent three...

Data from: Tradeoffs with growth limit host range in complex life cycle helminths

Daniel Benesh, Geoff Parker, James C. Chubb & Kevin Lafferty
Parasitic worms with complex life cycles have several developmental stages, with each stage creating opportunities to infect additional host species. Using a dataset for 973 species of trophically transmitted acanthocephalans, cestodes, and nematodes, we confirmed that worms with longer life cycles (i.e. more successive hosts) infect a greater diversity of host species and taxa (after controlling for study effort). Generalism at the stage level was highest for ‘middle’ life stages, the second and third intermediate...

Data from: Sources of variation in maternal allocation in a long-lived mammal

Kaitlin R. Macdonald, Jay J. Rotella, Robert A. Garrott & William A. Link
Life history theory predicts allocation of energy to reproduction varies with maternal age but additional maternal features may be important to the allocation of energy to reproduction. We aimed to characterize age-specific variation in maternal allocation and assess the relationship between maternal allocation and other static and dynamic maternal features. Mass measurements of 531 mothers and pups were used with Bayesian hierarchical models to explain the relationship between diverse maternal attributes and both the proportion...

Data from: Climate drives adaptive genetic responses associated with survival in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

Lindsay Chaney, Bryce A. Richardson & Matthew J. Germino
A genecological approach was used to explore genetic variation for survival in Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush). Artemisia tridentata is a widespread and foundational shrub species in western North America. This species has become extremely fragmented, to the detriment of dependent wildlife, and efforts to restore it are now a land management priority. Common garden experiments were established at three sites with seedlings from 55 source-populations. Populations included each of the three predominant subspecies, and cytotype...

Data from: Macroecological drivers of zooplankton communities across the mountains of western North America

Charlie J.G. Loewen, Angela L. Strecker, Gary L. Larson, Allan Vogel, Janet M. Fischer, Rolf D. Vinebrooke & Charlie J. G. Loewen
Disentangling the environmental and spatial drivers of biological communities across large scales increasingly challenges modern ecology in a rapidly changing world. Here, we investigate the hierarchical and trait-based organization of regional and local factors of zooplankton communities at a macroscale of 1,240 mountain lakes and ponds spanning western North America (California, USA, to Yukon Territory, Canada). Variation partitioning was used to test the hypothesized importance of climate, connectivity, catchment features, and exotic sportfish to zooplankton...

Data from: Divergence in an obligate mutualism is not explained by divergent climatic factors

William Godsoe, Eva Strand, Christopher Irwin Smith, Jeremy B. Yoder, Todd C. Esque & Olle Pellmyr
Adaptation to divergent environments creates and maintains biological diversity, but we know little about the importance of different agents of ecological divergence. Coevolution in obligate mutualisms has been hypothesized to drive divergence, but this contention has rarely been tested against alternative ecological explanations. Here, we use a well-established example of coevolution in an obligate pollination mutualism, Yucca brevifolia and its two pollinating yucca moths, to test the hypothesis that divergence in this system is the...

Data from: Non-linear effect of sea ice: Spectacled Eider survival declines at both extremes of the ice spectrum

Katherine S. Christie, Tuula E. Hollmen, Paul Flint & David Douglas
Understanding the relationship between environmental factors and vital rates is an important step in predicting a species’ response to environmental change. Species associated with sea ice are of particular concern because sea ice is projected to decrease rapidly in polar environments with continued levels of greenhouse gas emissions. The relationship between sea ice and the vital rates of the Spectacled Eider, a threatened species that breeds in Alaska and Russia and winters in the Bering...

Data from: Harvesting wildlife affected by climate change: a modelling and management approach for polar bears

Eric V. Regehr, Ryan R. Wilson, Karyn D. Rode, Michael C. Runge & Harry L. Stern
The conservation of many wildlife species requires understanding the demographic effects of climate change, including interactions between climate change and harvest, which can provide cultural, nutritional or economic value to humans. We present a demographic model that is based on the polar bear Ursus maritimus life cycle and includes density-dependent relationships linking vital rates to environmental carrying capacity (K). Using this model, we develop a state-dependent management framework to calculate a harvest level that (i)...

Data from: Response of deep-sea biodiversity to abrupt deglacial and Holocene climate changes in the North Atlantic Ocean

Moriaki Yasuhara, Hisayo Okahashi, Thomas M. Cronin, Tine L. Rasmussen & Gene Hunt
Aim: Little is known about how marine biodiversity responds to oceanographic and climatic changes over the decadal to centennial time-scales which are most relevant for predicted climate changes due to greenhouse gas forcing. This paper aims to reveal decadal–centennial scale deep-sea biodiversity dynamics for the last 20,000 years and then explore potential environmental drivers. Location: The North Atlantic Ocean. Methods: We investigated deep-sea benthic microfossil records to reveal biodiversity dynamics and subsequently applied comprehensive ecological...

Data from: Social learning of migratory performance

Thomas Mueller, Robert B. O’Hara, Sarah J. Converse, Richard P. Urbanek & William F. Fagan
Successful bird migration can depend on individual learning, social learning, and innate navigation programs. Using 8 years of data on migrating whooping cranes, we were able to partition genetic and socially learned aspects of migration. Specifically, we analyzed data from a reintroduced population wherein all birds were captive bred and artificially trained by ultralight aircraft on their first lifetime migration. For subsequent migrations, in which birds fly individually or in groups but without ultralight escort,...

Data from: Movements of four native Hawaiian birds across a naturally fragmented landscape

Jessie L. Knowlton, David J. Flaspohler, Eben H. Paxton, Tadashi Fukami, Christian P. Giardina, Daniel S. Gruner & Erin E. Wilson Rankin
Animals often increase their fitness by moving across space in response to temporal variation in habitat quality and resource availability, and as a result of intra and inter-specific interactions. The long-term persistence of populations and even whole species depends on the collective patterns of individual movements, yet animal movements have been poorly studied at the landscape level. We quantified movement behavior within four native species of Hawaiian forest birds in a complex lava-fragmented landscape: Hawai‛i...

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: The genetic basis of speciation in the Giliopsis lineage of Ipomopsis (Polemoniaceae)

Troy E. Wood, Takuya Nakazato & Loren H. Rieseberg
One of the most powerful drivers of speciation in plants is pollinator-mediated disruptive selection, which leads to the divergence of floral traits adapted to the morphology and behavior of different pollinators. Despite the widespread importance of this speciation mechanism, its genetic basis has been explored in only a few groups. Here, we characterize the genetic basis of pollinator-mediated divergence of two species in genus Ipomopsis, I. guttata and I. tenuifolia, using quantitative trait locus (QTL)...

Data from: Population genomic analysis suggests strong influence of river network on spatial distribution of genetic variation in invasive saltcedar across the southwestern US

Soo-Rang Lee, Yeong-Seok Jo, Chan-Ho Park, Jonathan M. Friedman & Matthew S. Olson
Understanding the complex influences of landscape and anthropogenic elements that shape the population genetic structure of invasive species provides insight into patterns of colonization and spread. The application of landscape genomics techniques to these questions may offer detailed, previously undocumented insights into factors influencing species invasions. We investigated the spatial pattern of genetic variation and the influences of landscape factors on population similarity in the invasive riparian shrub saltcedar (Tamarix L.) by analyzing 1,997 genome-wide...

Data from: Influence of damming on anuran species richness in riparian areas: a test of the serial discontinuity concept

Jacquelyn C. Guzy, Evan A. Eskew, Brian J. Halstead & Steven J. Price
1. Almost all large rivers worldwide are fragmented by dams, and their impacts have been modelled using the serial discontinuity concept (SDC), a series of predictions regarding responses of key biotic and abiotic variables. 2. We evaluated the effects of damming on anuran communities along a 245-km river corridor by conducting repeated, time-constrained anuran calling surveys at 42 locations along the Broad and Pacolet Rivers in South Carolina, USA. 3. Using a hierarchical Bayesian analysis,...

Data from: Is ungulate migration culturally transmitted? Evidence of social learning from translocated animals

Brett R. Jesmer, Jerod A. Merkle, Jacob R. Goheen, Ellen O. Aikens, Jeffrey L. Beck, Alyson B. Courtemanch, Mark A. Hurley, Douglas E. McWhirter, Hollie M. Miyasaki, Kevin L. Monteith & Matthew J. Kauffman
Ungulate migrations are assumed to stem from learning and cultural transmission of information regarding seasonal distribution of forage, but this hypothesis has not been tested empirically. We compared the migratory propensities of bighorn sheep and moose translocated into novel habitats with those of historical populations that had persisted for hundreds of years. Whereas individuals from historical populations were largely migratory, translocated individuals initially were not. After multiple decades, however, translocated populations gained knowledge about surfing...

Data from: The role of habitat filtering in the leaf economics spectrum and plant susceptibility to pathogen infection

Miranda E. Welsh, James Patrick Cronin & Charles E. Mitchell
The leaf economics spectrum (LES) describes global covariation in the traits of plant leaves. The LES is thought to arise from biophysical constraints and habitat filtering (ecological selection against unfit trait combinations along environmental gradients). However, the role of habitat filtering in generating the LES has not been tested experimentally. If the process of habitat filtering plays a role in generating the LES, the LES could weaken in communities that have yet to be filtered...

Data from: Homing of invasive Burmese pythons in South Florida: evidence for map and compass senses in snakes

Shannon E. Pittman, Kristen M. Hart, Michael S. Cherkiss, Ray W. Snow, Ikuko Fujisaki, Brian J. Smith, Frank J. Mazzotti & Michael E. Dorcas
Navigational ability is a critical component of an animal's spatial ecology and may influence the invasive potential of species. Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) are apex predators invasive to South Florida. We tracked the movements of 12 adult Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park, six of which were translocated 21–36 km from their capture locations. Translocated snakes oriented movement homeward relative to the capture location, and five of six snakes returned to within 5 km...

Data from: Co-occurrence dynamics of endangered Lower Keys marsh rabbits and free-ranging domestic cats: prey responses to an exotic predator removal program

Michael V. Cove, Beth Gardner, Theodore R. Simons & Allan F. O'Connell
The Lower Keys marsh rabbit is one of many endangered endemic species of the Florida Keys. The main threats are habitat loss and fragmentation from sea level rise, development, and habitat succession. Exotic predators such as free-ranging domestic cats pose an additional threat to these endangered small mammals. Management strategies have focused on habitat restoration and exotic predator control. However, the effectiveness of predator removal and the effects of anthropogenic habitat modifications and restoration have...

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