297 Works

Data from: Genomic pedigree reconstruction identifies predictors of mating and reproductive success in an invasive vertebrate

Brenna A Levine, Marlis R Douglas, Amy A Yackel Adams, Bjorn Lardner, Robert N Reed, Julie A Savidge & Michael E Douglas
The persistence of an invasive species is influenced by its reproductive ecology, and a successful control program must operate on this premise. However, the reproductive ecology of invasive species may be enigmatic due to factors that also limit their management, such as cryptic coloration and behavior. We explored the mating and reproductive ecology of the invasive Brown Treesnake (BTS: Boiga irregularis) by reconstructing a multigenerational genomic pedigree based on 654 single nucleotide polymorphisms for a...

Data from: Marine latitudinal diversity gradients, niche conservatism, and out of the tropics and Arctic: climatic sensitivity of small organisms

Wing Tung Ruby Chiu, Moriaki Yasuhara, Thomas Cronin, Gene Hunt, Laura Gemery & Chih-Lin Wei
Aim The latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) is a consequence of evolutionary and ecological mechanisms acting over long history, and thus is best investigated with organisms that have rich fossil records. However, combined neontological-paleontological investigations are mostly limited to large, shelled invertebrates, which keeps our mechanistic understanding of LDGs in its infancy. This paper aims to describe the modern meiobenthic ostracod LDG and to explore the possible controlling factors and the evolutionary mechanisms of this large-scale...

Data from: Aridity Drives Spatiotemporal Patterns of Masting Across the Latitudinal Range of a Dryland Conifer

Andreas Wion, Peter Weisberg, Ian Pearse & Miranda Redmond
Masting, or the synchronous and irregular production of seed crops, is controlled by environmental cues and resource budgets. Increasing temperatures and shifting precipitation regimes may alter the frequency and magnitude of masting, especially in species that experience chronic resource stress. Yet the effects of a changing climate on seed production are unlikely to be uniform across populations, particularly those that span broad abiotic gradients. In this study, we assessed the spatiotemporal patterns of masting across...

Data from: Genotyping-by-sequencing illuminates high levels of divergence among sympatric forms of coregonines in the Laurentian Great Lakes

Amanda Ackiss, Wesley Larson & Wendylee Stott
Effective resource management depends on our ability to partition diversity into biologically meaningful units. Recent evolutionary divergence, however, can often lead to ambiguity in morphological and genetic differentiation, complicating the delineation of valid conservation units. Such is the case with the “coregonine problem,” where recent post-glacial radiations of coregonines into lacustrine habitats resulted in the evolution of numerous species flocks, often with ambiguous taxonomy. The application of genomics methods is beginning to shed light on...

Supporting information and data for \"Chapter 1: Constraining Hydraulic Permeability at Great Depth by Using Magnetotellurics\" in Pepin JD (2019) New Approaches to Geothermal Resource Exploration and Characterization (PhD dissertation)

Jeff D. Pepin, Mark A. Person, Shari A. Kelley, Jared R. Peacock & Jesus D. Gomez-Valez
This supporting information includes additional text, figures, and tables regarding the newly derived sodium-chloride fluid resistivity model and the magnetotelluric (MT) inversion methodology. It also includes additional simulated electrical resistivity results that are not explicitly presented in the main text; the three simulations featured in the main text are selected to represent this larger set of simulations. Six supporting datasets are also described in this document. The first is a compilation of previously published laboratory-measured...

Data from: Effective number of breeders provides a link between interannual variation in stream flow and individual reproductive contribution in a stream salmonid

Andrew R. Whiteley, Jason A. Coombs, Matthew Cembrola, Matthew J. O'Donnell, Mark Hudy, Keith H. Nislow & Benjamin H. Letcher
The effective number of breeders that give rise to a cohort (Nb) is a promising metric for genetic monitoring of species with overlapping generations; however, more work is needed to understand factors that contribute to variation in this measure in natural populations. We tested hypotheses related to interannual variation in Nb in two long-term studies of brook trout populations. We found no supporting evidence for our initial hypothesis that inline image reflects inline image (defined...

Data from: Intraspecific variability and reaction norms of forest understory plant species traits

Julia I. Burton, Steven S. Perakis, Sean C. McKenzie, Caitlin E. Lawrence & Klaus J. Puettmann
1.Trait-based models of ecological communities typically assume intraspecific variation in functional traits is not important, though such variation can change species trait rankings along gradients in resources and environmental conditions, and thus influence community structure and function. 2. We examined the degree of intraspecific relative to interspecific variation, and reaction norms of 11 functional traits for 57 forest understory plant species, including: intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE), Δ15N, 5 leaf traits, 2 stem traits and 2...

Data from: Macroecological patterns of sexual size dimorphism in turtles of the world

Mickey Agha, Joshua R. Ennen, A. Justin Nowakowski, Jeffrey E. Lovich, Sarah C. Sweat & Brian D. Todd
Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is a well-documented phenomenon in both plants and animals; however, the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that drive and maintain SSD patterns across geographic space at regional and global scales are understudied, especially for reptiles. Our goal was to examine geographic variation of turtle SSD and to explore ecological and environmental correlates using phylogenetic comparative methods. We use published body size data on 135 species from nine turtle families to examine how...

Data from: Population genomic analysis suggests strong influence of river network on spatial distribution of genetic variation in invasive saltcedar across the southwestern US

Soo-Rang Lee, Yeong-Seok Jo, Chan-Ho Park, Jonathan M. Friedman & Matthew S. Olson
Understanding the complex influences of landscape and anthropogenic elements that shape the population genetic structure of invasive species provides insight into patterns of colonization and spread. The application of landscape genomics techniques to these questions may offer detailed, previously undocumented insights into factors influencing species invasions. We investigated the spatial pattern of genetic variation and the influences of landscape factors on population similarity in the invasive riparian shrub saltcedar (Tamarix L.) by analyzing 1,997 genome-wide...

Data from: Habitat drives dispersal and survival of translocated juvenile desert tortoises

Melia G. Nafus, Todd C. Esque, Roy C. Averill-Murray, Kenneth E. Nussear & Ronald R. Swaisgood
In spite of growing reliance on translocations in wildlife conservation, translocation efficacy remains inconsistent. One factor that can contribute to failed translocations is releasing animals into poor-quality or otherwise inadequate habitat. Here, we used a targeted approach to test the relationship of habitat features to post-translocation dispersal and survival of juvenile Mojave desert tortoises Gopherus agassizii. We selected three habitat characteristics – rodent burrows, substrate texture (prevalence and size of rocks) and washes (ephemeral river...

Data from: Co-occurrence dynamics of endangered Lower Keys marsh rabbits and free-ranging domestic cats: prey responses to an exotic predator removal program

Michael V. Cove, Beth Gardner, Theodore R. Simons & Allan F. O'Connell
The Lower Keys marsh rabbit is one of many endangered endemic species of the Florida Keys. The main threats are habitat loss and fragmentation from sea level rise, development, and habitat succession. Exotic predators such as free-ranging domestic cats pose an additional threat to these endangered small mammals. Management strategies have focused on habitat restoration and exotic predator control. However, the effectiveness of predator removal and the effects of anthropogenic habitat modifications and restoration have...

Data from: Landscape genetic approaches to guide native plant restoration in the Mojave Desert

Daniel F. Shryock, Caroline A. Havrilla, Lesley A. DeFalco, Todd C. Esque, Nathan A. Custer & Troy E. Wood
Restoring dryland ecosystems is a global challenge due to synergistic drivers of disturbance coupled with unpredictable environmental conditions. Dryland plant species have evolved complex life-history strategies to cope with fluctuating resources and climatic extremes. Although rarely quantified, local adaptation is likely widespread among these species and potentially influences restoration outcomes. The common practice of reintroducing propagules to restore dryland ecosystems, often across large spatial scales, compels evaluation of adaptive divergence within these species. Such evaluations...

Data from: Influence of damming on anuran species richness in riparian areas: a test of the serial discontinuity concept

Jacquelyn C. Guzy, Evan A. Eskew, Brian J. Halstead & Steven J. Price
1. Almost all large rivers worldwide are fragmented by dams, and their impacts have been modelled using the serial discontinuity concept (SDC), a series of predictions regarding responses of key biotic and abiotic variables. 2. We evaluated the effects of damming on anuran communities along a 245-km river corridor by conducting repeated, time-constrained anuran calling surveys at 42 locations along the Broad and Pacolet Rivers in South Carolina, USA. 3. Using a hierarchical Bayesian analysis,...

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Homing of invasive Burmese pythons in South Florida: evidence for map and compass senses in snakes

Shannon E. Pittman, Kristen M. Hart, Michael S. Cherkiss, Ray W. Snow, Ikuko Fujisaki, Brian J. Smith, Frank J. Mazzotti & Michael E. Dorcas
Navigational ability is a critical component of an animal's spatial ecology and may influence the invasive potential of species. Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) are apex predators invasive to South Florida. We tracked the movements of 12 adult Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park, six of which were translocated 21–36 km from their capture locations. Translocated snakes oriented movement homeward relative to the capture location, and five of six snakes returned to within 5 km...

Data from: Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse - effects of selection and gene conversion

Piotr Minias, Zachary W. Bateson, Linda A. Whittingham, Jeff A. Johnson, Sara Oyler-McCance & Peter O. Dunn
Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intra- and extra-cellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked...

Data from: A new mechanistic approach for the further development of a population with established size bimodality

Lisa Heermann, Donald L. DeAngelis & Jost Borcherding
Usually, the origin of a within-cohort bimodal size distribution is assumed to be caused by initial size differences or by one discrete period of accelerated growth for one part of the population. The aim of this study was to determine if more continuous pathways exist allowing shifts from the small to the large fraction within a bimodal age-cohort. Therefore, a Eurasian perch population, which had already developed a bimodal size-distribution and had differential resource use...

Data from: An integrated population model for bird monitoring in North America

Farshid S. Ahrestani, James F. Saracco, John R. Sauer, Keith Pardieck, J. Andrew Royle & Keith L. Pardieck
Integrated population models (IPMs) provide a unified framework for simultaneously analyzing data sets of different types to estimate vital rates, population size, and dynamics; assess contributions of demographic parameters to population changes; and assess population viability. Strengths of an IPM include the ability to estimate latent parameters and improve the precision of parameter estimates. We present a hierarchical IPM that combines two broad-scale avian monitoring data sets; count data from the North American Breeding Bird...

Data from: Integrating encounter theory with decision analysis to evaluate collision risk and determine optimal protection zones for wildlife

Bradley J. Udell, Julien Martin, , Mathieu Bonneau, Holly Edwards, Timothy A. Gowan, Stacie K. Hardy, Eliezer Gurarie, Charles Calleson, Charles J. Deutsch, Robert J. Fletcher & Charles S. Calleson
1. Better understanding human-wildlife interactions and their links with management can help improve the design of wildlife protection zones. One important example is the problem of wildlife collisions with vehicles or human-built structures (e.g. power lines, wind farms). In fact, collisions between marine wildlife and watercraft are among the major threats faced by several endangered species of marine mammals. Natural resource managers are therefore interested in finding cost-effective solutions to mitigate these threats. 2. We...

Data from: Herbicides and herbivory interact to drive plant community and crop-tree establishment

Thomas D. Stokely, Jake Verschuyl, Joan C. Hagar & Matthew G. Betts
Land management practices often directly alter vegetation structure and composition, but the degree to which ecological processes such as herbivory interact with management to influence biodiversity is less well understood. We hypothesized that large herbivores compound the effects of intensive forest management on early-seral plant communities and plantation establishment (i.e., tree survival and growth), and the degree of such effects is dependent on the intensity of management practices. We established 225 m2 wild ungulate (deer...

Data from: Non-linear effect of sea ice: Spectacled Eider survival declines at both extremes of the ice spectrum

Katherine S. Christie, Tuula E. Hollmen, Paul Flint & David Douglas
Understanding the relationship between environmental factors and vital rates is an important step in predicting a species’ response to environmental change. Species associated with sea ice are of particular concern because sea ice is projected to decrease rapidly in polar environments with continued levels of greenhouse gas emissions. The relationship between sea ice and the vital rates of the Spectacled Eider, a threatened species that breeds in Alaska and Russia and winters in the Bering...

Data from: Is ungulate migration culturally transmitted? Evidence of social learning from translocated animals

Brett R. Jesmer, Jerod A. Merkle, Jacob R. Goheen, Ellen O. Aikens, Jeffrey L. Beck, Alyson B. Courtemanch, Mark A. Hurley, Douglas E. McWhirter, Hollie M. Miyasaki, Kevin L. Monteith & Matthew J. Kauffman
Ungulate migrations are assumed to stem from learning and cultural transmission of information regarding seasonal distribution of forage, but this hypothesis has not been tested empirically. We compared the migratory propensities of bighorn sheep and moose translocated into novel habitats with those of historical populations that had persisted for hundreds of years. Whereas individuals from historical populations were largely migratory, translocated individuals initially were not. After multiple decades, however, translocated populations gained knowledge about surfing...

Data from: Convergence of soil nitrogen isotopes across global climate gradients

Joseph M. Craine, Andrew J. Elmore, Lixin Wang, Laurent Augusto, W. Troy Baisden, E. N. J. Brookshire, Michael D. Cramer, Niles J. Hasselquist, Erik A. Hobbie, Ansgar Kahmen, Keisuke Koba, J. Marty Kranabetter, Michelle C. Mack, Erika Marin-Spiotta, Jordan R. Mayor, Kendra K. McLauchlan, Anders Michelsen, Gabriela B. Nardoto, Rafael S. Oliveira, Steven S. Perakis, Pablo L. Peri, Carlos A. Quesada, Andreas Richter, Louis A. Schipper, Bryan A. Stevenson … & Bernd Zeller
Quantifying global patterns of terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycling is central to predicting future patterns of primary productivity, carbon sequestration, nutrient fluxes to aquatic systems, and climate forcing. With limited direct measures of soil N cycling at the global scale, syntheses of the 15N:14N ratio of soil organic matter across climate gradients provide key insights into understanding global patterns of N cycling. In synthesizing data from over 6000 soil samples, we show strong global relationships among...

Data from: Recovery of a mining-damaged stream ecosystem

Christopher A. Mebane, Robert J. Eakins, Brian G. Fraser & William J. Adams
This paper presents a 30+ year record of changes in benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish populations associated with improving water quality in mining-influenced streams. Panther Creek, a tributary to the Salmon River in central Idaho, USA suffered intensive damage from mining and milling operations at the Blackbird Mine that released copper (Cu), arsenic (As), and cobalt (Co) into tributaries. From the 1960s through the 1980s, no fish and few aquatic invertebrates could be found in...

Data from: The role of habitat filtering in the leaf economics spectrum and plant susceptibility to pathogen infection

Miranda E. Welsh, James Patrick Cronin & Charles E. Mitchell
The leaf economics spectrum (LES) describes global covariation in the traits of plant leaves. The LES is thought to arise from biophysical constraints and habitat filtering (ecological selection against unfit trait combinations along environmental gradients). However, the role of habitat filtering in generating the LES has not been tested experimentally. If the process of habitat filtering plays a role in generating the LES, the LES could weaken in communities that have yet to be filtered...

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