36 Works

Data from: Genetic analyses reveal cryptic introgression in secretive marsh bird populations

Stephanie S. Coster, Amy B. Welsh, Gary Costanzo, Sergio R. Harding, James T. Anderson, Susan B. McRae & Todd E. Katzner
Hybridization is common in bird populations but can be challenging for management, especially if one of the two parent species is of greater conservation concern than the other. King rails (Rallus elegans) and clapper rails (R. crepitans) are two marsh bird species with similar morphologies, behaviors, and overlapping distributions. The two species are found along a salinity gradient with the king rail in freshwater marshes and the clapper in estuarine marshes. However, this separation is...

Data from: Eco-evolutionary rescue promotes host-pathogen coexistence

Graziella V. DiRenzo, Elise F. Zipkin, Evan H. Campbell Grant, J. Andrew Royle, Ana V. Longo, Kelly R. Zamudio & Karen R. Lips
Emerging infectious pathogens are responsible for some of the most severe host mass-mortality events in wild populations. Yet, effective pathogen control strategies are notoriously difficult to identify, in part because quantifying and forecasting pathogen spread and disease dynamics is challenging. Following an outbreak, hosts must cope with the presence of the pathogen, leading to host-pathogen coexistence or extirpation. Despite decades of research, little is known about host-pathogen coexistence post-outbreak when low host abundances and cryptic...

Data from: Regional variation in drivers of connectivity for two frog species (Rana pretiosa and R. luteiventris) from the U.S. Pacific Northwest

Jeane M. Robertson, Melanie A. Murphy, Christopher A. Pearl, Michael J. Adams, Monica I. Páez-Vacas, Susan M. Haig, David S. Pilliod, Andrew Storfer & W. Chris Funk
Comparative landscape genetics has uncovered high levels of variation in which landscape factors affect connectivity among species and regions. However, the relative importance of species traits vs. environmental variation for predicting landscape patterns of connectivity is unresolved. We provide evidence from a landscape genetics study of two sister taxa of frogs, the Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) and the Columbia spotted frog (R. luteiventris) in Oregon and Idaho, USA. Rana pretiosa is relatively more dependent...

Data from: Intraspecific niche models for ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) suggest potential variability in population-level response to climate change.

Kaitlin C. Maguire, Douglas J. Shinneman, Kevin M. Potter & Valerie D. Hipkins
Unique responses to climate change can occur across intraspecific levels, resulting in individualistic adaptation or movement patterns among populations within a given species. Thus, the need to model potential responses among genetically distinct populations within a species is increasingly recognized. However, predictive models of future distributions are regularly fit at the species level, often because intraspecific variation is unknown or is identified only within limited sample locations. In this study, we considered the role of...

Data from: Functional group, biomass, and climate change effects on ecological drought in semiarid grasslands

Scott D. Wilson, Daniel R. Schlaepfer, John B. Bradford, William K. Lauenroth, Michael C. Duniway, Sonia A. Hall, Khishigbayar Jamiyansharav, G. Jia, Ariuntsetseg Lkhagva, Seth M. Munson, David A. Pyke & Britta Tietjen
Water relations in plant communities are influenced both by contrasting functional groups (grasses, shrubs) and by climate change via complex effects on interception, uptake and transpiration. We modelled the effects of functional group replacement and biomass increase, both of which can be outcomes of invasion and vegetation management, and climate change on ecological drought (soil water potential below which photosynthesis stops) in 340 semiarid grassland sites over 30-year periods. Relative to control vegetation (climate and...

Data from: Lactation and resource limitation affect stress responses, thyroid hormones, immune function and antioxidant capacity of sea otters (Enhydra lutris)

Sarah M. Chinn, Daniel H. Monson, M. Tim Tinker, Michelle M. Staedler & Daniel E. Crocker
1. Lactation is the most energetically demanding stage of reproduction in female mammals. Increased energetic allocation toward current reproduction may result in fitness costs, though the mechanisms underlying these trade-offs are not well understood. Trade-offs during lactation may include reduced energetic allocation to cellular maintenance, immune response and survival, and may be influenced by resource limitation. 2. As the smallest marine mammal, sea otters (Enhydra lutris) have the highest mass-specific metabolic rate necessitating substantial energetic...

Data from: Evaluating consumptive and nonconsumptive predator effects on prey density using field times series data

, Scott D. Peacor, David B. Bunnell, Henry A. Vanderploeg, Steve A. Pothoven, Ashley K. Elgin, James R. Bence, Jing Jiao, Edward L. Ionides, D.B. Bunnell, J.A. Marino, E.L. Ionides, S.A. Pothoven, A.K. Elgin, H.A. Vanderploeg, S.D. Peacor & J.R. Bence
Determining the degree to which predation affects prey abundance in natural communities constitutes a key goal of ecological research. Predators can affect prey through both consumptive effects (CEs) and nonconsumptive effects (NCEs), although the contributions of each mechanism to the density of prey populations remain largely hypothetical in most systems. Common statistical methods applied to time series data cannot elucidate the mechanisms responsible for hypothesized predator effects on prey density (e.g., differentiate CEs from NCEs),...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: Density‐dependent and phenological mismatch effects on growth and survival in lesser snow and Ross's goslings

Megan V. Ross, Ray T. Alisauskas, David C. Douglas, Dana K. Kellett & Kiel L. Drake
Strong seasonality of high‐latitude environments imposes temporal constraints on forage availability and quality for keystone herbivores in terrestrial arctic ecosystems, including hyper‐abundant colonial geese. Changes in food quality due to intraspecific competition, or food availability relative to the breeding phenology of birds, may have consequences for growth and survival of young. We used long‐term data (1993‐2014) from the Karrak Lake nesting colony in the Canadian central arctic to study relative roles of density and phenological...

Data from: Insular biogeographic origins and high phylogenetic distinctiveness for a recently depleted lizard fauna from Christmas Island, Australia

Paul M. Oliver, Mozes P.K. Blom, Harold G. Cogger, Robert N. Fisher, Jonathan Q. Richmond, John C.Z. Woinarski & John C. Z. Woinarski
Striking faunal turnover across Asia and Australasia, most famously along the eastern edge of the Sunda Shelf or ‘Wallace’s Line’, has been a focus of biogeographic research for over 150 years. Here we investigate the origins of a highly threatened endemic lizard fauna (4 species) on Christmas Island. Despite occurring less 350 km south of the Sunda Shelf, this fauna mostly comprises species from clades centred on the more distant regions of Wallacea, the Pacific...

Data from: Sora (Porzana carolina) autumn migration habitat use

Auriel M.V. Fournier, Doreen C. Mengel, David G. Krementz & Auriel M. V. Fournier
Palustrine wetland management across the United States is often conducted under a moist soil management framework aimed at providing energetic resources for non-breeding waterfowl. Moist soil management techniques typically include seasonal water-level manipulations and mechanical soil disturbance to create conditions conducive to germination and growth of early successional, seed-producing wetland plants. The assumption is that providing stopover and wintering habitat for non-breeding waterfowl will also accommodate life history needs of a broader suite of migratory...

Data from: Experimental evidence of long-term reproductive costs in a colonial nesting seabird

Aly McKnight, Erik J. Blomberg, Gregory H. Golet, David B. Irons, Cynthia S. Loftin & Shawn T. McKInney
Trade-offs between current and future reproduction are central to the evolution of life histories. Experiments that manipulate brood size provide an effective approach to investigating future costs of current reproduction. Most manipulative studies to date, however, have addressed only the short-term effects of brood size manipulation. Our goal was to determine whether survival or breeding costs of reproduction in a long-lived species manifest beyond the subsequent breeding season. To this end, we investigated long-term survival...

Data from: Two-species occupancy modeling accounting for species misidentification and nondetection

Thierry Chambert, Evan H. Campbell Grant, David A. W. Miller, James D. Nichols, Kevin P. Mulder & Adrianne B. Brand
1.In occupancy studies, species misidentification can lead to false positive detections, which can cause severe estimator biases. Currently, all models that account for false positive errors only consider omnibus sources of false detections and are limited to single species occupancy. 2.However, false detections for a given species often occur because of the misidentification with another, closely-related species. To exploit this explicit source of false positive detection error, we develop a two-species occupancy model that accounts...

Data from: Whole-genome analysis of Mustela erminea finds that pulsed hybridization impacts evolution at high-latitudes

Jocelyn P Colella, Tian-Ying Lan, Stephan C Schuster, Sandra L Talbot, Joseph A Cook & Charlotte Lindqvist
At high-latitude, climatic shifts hypothetically drove episodes of divergence during isolation in glacial refugia, or ice-free pockets of land that enabled terrestrial species persistence. Upon glacial recession, populations can expand and often come into contact, resulting in admixture between previously isolated groups. To understand how recurrent periods of isolation and contact have impacted evolution at high latitudes, we investigated introgression in the stoat (Mustela erminea), a Holarctic mammalian carnivore, using whole-genome sequences. We identify two...

Data from: Defining the risk landscape in the context of pathogen pollution: Toxoplasma gondii in sea otters along the Pacific Rim

Tristan L. Burgess, M. Tim Tinker, Melissa A. Miller, James L. Bodkin, Michael J. Murray, Justin A. Saarinen, Linda M. Nichol, Shawn Larson, Patricia A. Conrad & Christine K. Johnson
Pathogens entering the marine environment as pollutants exhibit a spatial signature driven by their transport mechanisms. The sea otter (Enhydra lutris), a marine animal that lives much of its life within sight of land, presents a unique opportunity to understand land-sea pathogen transmission. Using a dataset on Toxoplasma gondii prevalence across sea otter range from Alaska to California, we found that the dominant drivers of infection risk vary depending upon the spatial scale of analysis....

Data from: Using partial aggregation in Spatial Capture Recapture

Cyril Milleret, Pierre Dupont, Henrik Brøseth, Jonas Kindberg, J. Andrew Royle & Richard Bischof
1. Spatial capture-recapture (SCR) models are commonly used for analyzing data collected using non-invasive genetic sampling (NGS). Opportunistic NGS often leads to detections that do not occur at discrete detector locations. Therefore, spatial aggregation of individual detections into fixed detectors (e.g. center of grid cells) is an option to increase computing speed of SCR analyses. However, it may reduce precision and accuracy of parameter estimations. 2. Using simulations, we explored the impact that spatial aggregation...

Data from: The epidemiology of avian pox and interaction with avian malaria in Hawaiian forest birds

Michael D. Samuel, Bethany L. Woodworth, Carter T. Atkinson, Patrick J. Hart & Dennis A. LaPointe
Despite the purported role of avian pox (Avipoxvirus spp.) in the decline of endemic Hawaiian birds, few studies have been conducted on the dynamics of this disease, its impact on free-living avian populations, or its interactions with avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum). We conducted four longitudinal studies of 3-7 years in length and used generalized linear models to evaluate cross–sectional prevalence of active pox infection and individuals with healed deformities that had recovered from pox. Our...

Ecosystem Scale Measurements of Methyl Halide Fluxes from a Brackish Tidal Marsh Invaded with Perennial Pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium)

Malte Julian Deventer, Yi Jiao, Sarah Knox, Frank Anderson, Matthew Ferner, Jared Lewis & Robert Rhew
Natural methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) emissions from coastal marsh ecosystems may constitute a significant proportion of stratospheric chlorine and bromine, which catalyze ozone depletion. Current inventories involve substantial uncertainties associated with up-scaling plot-scale footprints (i.e., ≤ 1m2). Here we present net ecosystem flux measurements of methyl halides from a brackish tidal marsh on the west coast of the United States between April 2016 and June 2017 using the relaxed eddy accumulation method....

Data from: Potential limits to the benefits of admixture during biological invasion

Brittany S. Barker, Janelle E. Cocio, Samantha R. Anderson, Joseph E. Braasch, F. Alice Cang, Heather D. Gillette & Katrina M. Dlugosch
Species introductions often bring together genetically divergent source populations, resulting in genetic admixture. This geographic reshuffling of diversity has the potential to generate favorable new genetic combinations, facilitating the establishment and invasive spread of introduced populations. Observational support for the superior performance of admixed introductions has been mixed, however, and the broad importance of admixture to invasion questioned. Under most underlying mechanisms, admixture’s benefits should be expected to increase with greater divergence among and lower...

Data from: State-space modelling of the flight behaviour of a soaring bird provides new insights to migratory strategies

Enrico Pirotta, Todd Katzner, Tricia A. Miller, Adam E. Duerr, Melissa A. Braham & Leslie New
1. Characterizing the spatiotemporal variation of animal behaviour can elucidate the way individuals interact with their environment and allocate energy. Increasing sophistication of tracking technologies paired with novel analytical approaches allows the characterisation of movement dynamics even when an individual is not directly observable. 2. In this study, high-resolution movement data collected via global positioning system (GPS) tracking in three dimensions were paired with topographical information and used in a Bayesian state-space model to describe...

Data from: Quantitative acoustic differentiation of cryptic species illustrated with King and Clapper rails

Lydia L. Stiffler, Katie M. Schroeder, James T. Anderson, Susan B. McRae & Todd E. Katzner
Reliable species identification is vital for survey and monitoring programs. Recently, the development of digital technology for recording and analyzing vocalizations has assisted in acoustic surveying for cryptic, rare, or elusive species. However, the quantitative tools that exist for species differentiation are still being refined. Using vocalizations recorded in the course of ecological studies of a King Rail (Rallus elegans) and a Clapper Rail (R. crepitans) population, we assessed the accuracy and effectiveness of three...

Data from: New insights into the phylogenetics and population structure of the prairie falcon (Falco mexicanus)

Jacqueline M. Doyle, Douglas A. Bell, Peter H. Bloom, Gavin Emmons, Amy Fesnock, Todd E. Katzner, Larry LaPré, Kolbe Leonard, Phillip SanMiguel, Rick Westerman & J. Andrew DeWoody
Background: Management requires a robust understanding of between- and within-species genetic variability, however such data are still lacking in many species. For example, although multiple population genetics studies of the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) have been conducted, no similar studies have been done of the closely-related prairie falcon (F. mexicanus) and it is unclear how much genetic variation and population structure exists across the species’ range. Furthermore, the phylogenetic relationship of F. mexicanus relative to...

Data from: The contribution of road-based citizen science efforts to the conservation of pond-breeding amphibians

Sean C. Sterrett, Rachel A. Katz, William R. Fields, Evan H.C. Grant & Evan H. Campbell Grant
1. Road-side amphibian citizen science programs bring together volunteers focused on collecting scientific data while working to mitigate population declines by directly reducing road mortality of pond-breeding amphibians. Despite the international popularity of these movement-based road-side conservation efforts (i.e., ‘big nights’, ‘bucket brigades’ and ‘toad patrols’), direct benefits to conservation have rarely been quantified or evaluated. 2. As a case study, we used a population simulation approach to evaluate how volunteer intensity, frequency and distribution...

Climate, snow, and soil moisture data set for the Tuolumne and Merced River watersheds, California, USA

James Roche, Robert Rice, Xiande Meng, Daniel Cayan, Mike Dettinger, Douglas Alden, Sarina Patel, Megan Mason, Martha Conklin & Roger Bales
UCM sites. Snow depth, soil moisture and soil temperature are measured near the Merced Grove, Gin Flat, Smoky Jack Creek, and Olmsted Quarry with a distributed array of 6-7 sensor nodes at each location. Snow depth is measured in the open, at the drip edge and under canopies, as well as 3-4 other sites representative of an area of 1-2 hectares. Soil moisture and temperature are measured at 10, 30, 60 and 90 cm depths...

Data from: Carotenoid-based skin ornaments reflect foraging propensity in a seabird, Sula leucogaster

Nathan P. Michael, Roxana Torres, Andreanna J. Welch, Josh Adams, Mario Erandi Bonillas-Monge, Jonathan Felis, Laura Lopez-Marquez, Alejandro Martínez-Flores & Anne E. Wiley
Carotenoid-based ornaments are common signaling features in animals. It has long been proposed that such ornaments communicate information about foraging abilities to potential mates. However, evidence linking foraging with ornamentation is largely missing from unmanipulated, free-ranging populations. To investigate this relationship, we studied the brown booby (Sula leucogaster brewsteri), a seabird with a carotenoid-based gular skin ornament. 13C values from both feathers and blood plasma were negatively correlated with male gular color, indicating birds that...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    36

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    36

Affiliations

  • United States Geological Survey
    36
  • University of Wyoming
    4
  • West Virginia University
    3
  • University of Alberta
    3
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    3
  • Washington State University
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    2
  • The Ohio State University
    2