28 Works

Social status, forest disturbance, and Barred Owls shape long-term trends in breeding dispersal distance of Northern Spotted Owls

Julianna Jenkins, Damon Lesmeister, Eric Forsman, Katie Dugger, Steven Ackers, L. Steven Andrews, Chris McCafferty, M. Shane Pruett, Janice Reid, Stan Sovern, Rob Horn, Scott Gremel, J. David Wiens & Zhiqiang Yang
Dispersal among breeding sites in territorial animals (i.e. breeding dispersal) is driven by numerous selection pressures, including competition and spatiotemporal variation in habitat quality. The scale and trend of dispersal movements over time may signal changing conditions within the population or on the landscape. We examined 2,158 breeding dispersal events from 694 male and 608 female individually-marked Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) monitored over 28 years on seven study areas to assess the relative...

Urbanization reduces genetic connectivity in bobcats (Lynx rufus) at both intra- and inter-population spatial scales

Christopher P Kozakiewicz, Christopher Burridge, W. Chris Funk, Patricia E Salerno, Daryl R Trumbo, Roderick B Gagne, Erin E Boydston, Robert N Fisher, Lisa M Lyren, Megan K Jennings, Seth P D Riley, Laurel E K Serieys, Sue VandeWoude, Kevin R Crooks & Scott Carver
Urbanization is a major factor driving habitat fragmentation and connectivity loss in wildlife. However, the impacts of urbanization on connectivity can vary among species and even populations due to differences in local landscape characteristics, and our ability to detect these relationships may depend on the spatial scale at which they are measured. Bobcats (Lynx rufus) are relatively sensitive to urbanization and the status of bobcat populations is an important indicator of connectivity in urban coastal...

Data from: Mismatches between breeding phenology and resource abundance of resident alpine ptarmigan negatively affect chick survival

Gregory T. Wann, Cameron L. Aldridge, Amy E. Seglund, Sara J. Oyler-McCance, Boris C. Kondratieff & Clait E. Braun
1. Phenological mismatches – defined here as the difference in reproductive timing of an individual relative to the availability of its food resources – occur in many avian species. Mistiming breeding activities in environments with constrained breeding windows may have severe fitness costs due to reduced opportunities for repeated breeding attempts. Therefore, species occurring in alpine environments may be particularly vulnerable. 2. We studied fitness consequences of timing of breeding in an alpine-endemic species, the...

Xenon hydrate as an analogue of methane hydrate in geologic systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium

Xiaojing Fu, William Waite, Luis Cueto-Felgueroso & Ruben Juanes
This data set contains simulation results of hydrate growth on a gas-liquid interface for both methane and xenon hydrate systems. The simulations are performed on a 1D domain of 115 micron in length and for a duration of 40 minutes. The data set contains two MATLAB data files (methane_data.mat and xenon_data.mat) and one file to help users to visualize the data (plot_data.m). In the file plot_data.m, we also use experimental data from Taylor et al....

Pleistocene glacial cycles drove lineage diversification and fusion in the Yosemite toad (Anaxyrus canorus)

Paul A Maier, Amy G Vandergast, Steve M Ostoja, Andres Aguilar & Andrew J Bohonak
Species endemic to alpine environments can evolve via steep ecological selection gradients between lowland and upland environments. Additionally, many alpine environments have faced repeated glacial episodes over the past two million years, fracturing these endemics into isolated populations. In this “glacial pulse” model of alpine diversification, cycles of allopatry and ecologically divergent glacial refugia play a role in generating biodiversity, including novel admixed (“fused”) lineages. We tested for patterns of glacial pulse lineage diversification in...

Data from: Age and growth of stocked juvenile Shoal Bass in a tailwater: environmental variation and accuracy of daily age estimates

James Long & Michael Porta
Otolith microanalysis is often used to assess population age structure and growth of fishes during their early stages. Shoal Bass Micropterus cataractae is a recently described species of conservation concern and little is known regarding factors affecting their recruitment. In 2004, Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GADNR) and the US National Park Service (NPS) stocked Shoal Bass marked with oxytetracycline (OTC) in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia in an effort to restore this population,...

Data from: Negative frequency-dependent foraging behaviour in a generalist herbivore (Alces alces) and its stabilizing influence on food-web dynamics

Sarah R. Hoy, John A. Vucetich, Rongsong Liu, Don L. DeAngelis, Rolf O. Peterson, Leah M. Vucetich & John J. Henderson
1.Resource selection is widely appreciated to be context‐dependent and shaped by both biological and abiotic factors. However, few studies have empirically assessed the extent to which selective foraging behaviour is dynamic and varies in response to environmental conditions for free‐ranging animal populations. 2.Here, we assessed the extent that forage selection fluctuated in response to different environmental conditions for a free‐ranging herbivore, moose (Alces alces) in Isle Royale National Park, over a 10‐year period. More precisely,...

Data from: Migrating bison engineer the green wave

Chris Geremia, Jerod Merkle, Daniel Eacker, Rick Wallen, P.J. White, Mark Hebblewhite & Matthew Kauffman
Newly emerging plants provide the best forage for herbivores. To exploit this fleeting resource, migrating herbivores align their movements to surf the wave of spring green-up. With new technology to track migrating animals, the Green Wave Hypothesis has steadily gained empirical support across a diversity of migratory taxa. This hypothesis assumes the green wave is controlled by variation in climate, weather, and topography, and its progression dictates the timing, pace, and extent of migrations. However,...

Data from: Impact of prey occupancy and other ecological and anthropogenic factors on tiger distribution in Thailand’s Western Forest Complex

Somphot Duangchatrasiri, Pornkamol Jornburom, Sitthichai Jinamoy, Anak Pattanvibool, James E. Hines, Todd W. Arnold, John Fieberg & James L. D. Smith
1. Despite conservation efforts, large mammals such as tigers and their main prey, gaur, banteng, and sambar, are highly threatened and declining across their entire range. The only large viable source population of tigers in mainland Southeast Asia occurs in Thailand’s Western Forest Complex (WEFCOM), an approximately 19,000 km2 landscape of 17 contiguous protected areas. 2. We used an occupancy modeling framework, which accounts for imperfect detection, to identify the factors that affect tiger distribution...

Molecular sequencing and morphological identification reveal similar patterns in native bee communities across public and private grasslands of eastern North Dakota

Brian Darby, Russ Bryant, Abby Keller, Madison Jochim, Josephine Moe, Zoe Schreiner, Carrie Pratt, Ned H. Euliss, Mia Park, Rebecca Simmons & Clint Otto
Bees play a key role in the functioning of human-modified and natural ecosystems by pollinating agricultural crops and wild plant communities. Global pollinator conservation efforts need large-scale and long-term monitoring to detect changes in species’ demographic patterns and shifts in bee community structure. The objective of this project was to test a molecular sequencing pipeline that would utilize a commonly used locus, produce accurate and precise identifications consistent with morphological identifications, and generate data that...

Data from: Variation in selective regimes drives intraspecific variation in life-history traits and migratory behaviour along an elevational gradient

Carl Lundblad & Courtney Conway
Comparative studies, across and within taxa, have made important contributions to our understanding of the evolutionary processes that promote phenotypic diversity. Trait variation along geographic gradients provides a convenient heuristic for understanding what drives and maintains diversity. Intraspecific trait variation along latitudinal gradients is well-known, but elevational variation in the same traits is rarely documented. Trait variation along continuous elevational gradients, however, provides compelling evidence that individuals within a breeding population may experience different selective...

Predictive multi-scale occupancy models at range-wide extents: effects of habitat and human disturbance on distributions of wetland birds

Bryan Stevens & Courtney Conway
Aim: Predicting distributions is fundamental to ecology, yet hindered by spatially-restricted sampling, scale-dependent relationships, and detection error associated with field surveys. Predictive species distribution models (SDMs) are nonetheless vital for conservation of many species. We developed a framework for building predictive SDMs with multi-scale data, and used it to develop range-wide breeding-season SDMs for 14 marsh bird species of concern. Location: USA. Methods: We built SDMs using data from range-wide surveys conducted over 14 years,...

Data from: Extinction debt and delayed colonization have had comparable but unique effects on plant community-climate lags since the Last Glacial Maximum

Bradley J. Butterfield, R. Scott Anderson, Camille A. Holmgren & Julio L. Betancourt
Aim: Plant communities typically exhibit lagged responses to climate change due to poorly-understood effects of colonization and local extinction. Here, we quantify rates of change in mean cold tolerances, and contributions of colonization and local extinction to those rates, recorded in plant macrofossil assemblages from North American hot deserts over the last 30,000 years. Location: Mojave, Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts Time period: 30-0 thousand years before present (kybp) Major taxa studied: Vascular plants Methods: Colonization...

Data from: Integrated modeling predicts shifts in waterbird population dynamics under climate change

Qing Zhao, G. Scott Boomer & J. Andrew Royle
Climate change has been identified as one of the most important drivers of wildlife population dynamics. The in-depth knowledge of the complex relationships between climate and population sizes through density dependent demographic processes is important for understanding and predicting population shifts under climate change, which requires integrated population models (IPMs) that unify the analyses of demography and abundance data. In this study we developed an IPM based on Gaussian approximation to dynamic N-mixture models for...

Data from: Long-term population dynamics of dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. rostriformis): a cross-system analysis

David L. Strayer, Boris V. Adamovich, Rita Adrian, David C. Aldridge, Csilla Balogh, Lyubov E. Burlakova, Hannah B. Fried-Petersen, László G.‐Tóth, Amy L. Hetherington, Thomas S. Jones, Alexander Y. Karatayev, Jacqueline B. Madill, Oleg A. Makarevich, J. Ellen Marsden, Andre L. Martel, Dan Minchin, Thomas F. Nalepa, Ruurd Noordhuis, Timothy J. Robinson, Lars G. Rudstam, Astrid N. Schwalb, David R. Smith, Alan D. Steinman & Jonathan M. Jeschke
Dreissenid mussels (including the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha and the quagga mussel D. rostriformis) are among the world's most notorious invasive species, with large and widespread ecological and economic effects. However, their long‐term population dynamics are poorly known, even though these dynamics are critical to determining impacts and effective management. We gathered and analyzed 67 long‐term (>10 yr) data sets on dreissenid populations from lakes and rivers across Europe and North America. We addressed five...

DataCite Metadata Schema Documentation for the Publication and Citation of Research Data v4.3

1 Introduction 1.1 The DataCite Consortium 1.2 DataCite Community Participation 1.3 The Metadata Schema 1.4 Version 4.32 Update 2 DataCite Metadata Properties 2.1 Overview 2.2 Citation 2.3 DataCite Properties 3 XML Example 4 XML Schema 5 Other DataCite Services Appendices Appendix 1: Controlled List Definitions Appendix 2: Earlier Version Update Notes Appendix 3: Standard values for unknown information Appendix 4: Version 4.1 Changes in support of software citation Appendix 5: FORCE11 Software Citation Principles Mapping

Spatial sampling bias and model complexity in stream-based species distribution models: a case study of Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) in the Arkansas River basin, U.S.A.

Andrew Taylor, Thomas Hafen, Colt Holley, Alin González & James Long
Leveraging existing presence records and geospatial datasets, species distribution modeling has been widely applied to informing species conservation and restoration efforts. Maxent is one of the most popular modeling algorithms, yet recent research has demonstrated Maxent models are vulnerable to prediction errors related to spatial sampling bias and model complexity. Despite elevated rates of biodiversity imperilment in stream systems, the application of Maxent models to stream networks has lagged, as has the availability of tools...

Data from: Modelling misclassification in multi-species acoustic data when estimating occupancy and relative activity

Wilson J Wright, Kathryn M Irvine, Emily S Almberg & Andrea R Litt
1. Surveying wildlife communities provides data for informing conservation and management decisions that affect multiple species. Autonomous recording units (ARUs) can efficiently gather community data for a variety of taxa, but generally require software algorithms to classify each recorded call to a species. Species classification errors are possible during this process and result in both false negative and false positive detections. Available approaches for analysing ARU data do not model the species classification probabilities, meaning...

Assessing the Ecological Impacts of Biomass Harvesting along a Disturbance Severity Gradient

Valerie Kurth, Anthony D'Amato, John Bradford, Brian Palik & Christopher Looney
Disturbance is a central driver of forest development and ecosystem processes with variable effects within and across ecosystems. Despite the high levels of variation in disturbance severity often observed in forests following natural and anthropogenic disturbance, studies quantifying disturbance impacts often rely on categorical classifications, thus limiting opportunities to examine potential gradients in ecosystem response to a given disturbance or management regime. Given the potential increases in disturbance severity associated with global change, as well...

Data from: Changes in behavior are unable to disrupt a trophic cascade involving a specialist herbivore and its food plant

Madeleine G. Lohman, Thomas V. Riecke, Cheyenne R. Acevedo, Brian T. Person, Joel A. Schmutz, Brian D. Uher-Koch & James S. Sedinger
Changes in ecological conditions can induce changes in behavior and demography of wild organisms, which in turn may influence population dynamics. Black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) nesting in colonies on the Yukon–Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska have declined substantially (~50%) since the turn of the century. Black brant are herbivores that rely heavily on Carex subspathacea (Hoppner's sedge) during growth and development. The availability of C. subspathacea affects gosling growth rates, which subsequently affect...

Data from: Top-down effects of repatriating bald eagles hinder jointly recovering competitors

Jennyffer Cruz, Steven K. Windels, Wayne E. Thogmartin, Shawn M. Crimmins, Leland H. Grim, James H. Larson & Benjamin Zuckerberg
1. The recovery of piscivorous birds around the world is touted as one of the great conservation successes of the 21st century, but for some species, this success was short-lived. Bald eagles, ospreys, and great blue herons began repatriating Voyageurs National Park, USA, in the mid-20th century. However, after 1990, only eagles continued their recovery, while osprey and heron recovery failed for unknown reasons. 2. We aimed to evaluate whether top-down effects of bald eagles,...

Sea-level rise will drive divergent sediment transport patterns on fore reefs and reef flats, potentially causing erosion on Atoll Islands

James Bramante, Andrew D. Ashton, Curt D. Storlazzi, Olivia M. Cheriton & Jeffrey P. Donnelly
Atoll reef islands primarily consist of unconsolidated sediment, and their ocean-facing shorelines are maintained by sediment produced and transported across their reefs. Changes in incident waves can alter cross-shore sediment exchange and thus affect the sediment budget and morphology of atoll reef islands. Here we investigate the influence of sea-level rise and projected wave climate change on wave characteristics and cross-shore sediment transport across an atoll reef at Kwajalein Island, Republic of the Marshall Islands....

Migratory divides coincide with reproductive barriers across replicated avian hybrid zones above the Tibetan Plateau

Elizabeth Scordato, Chris Smith, Georgy Semenov, Yu Liu, Matthew Wilkins, Wei Liang, Alexander Rubtsov, Gomboobaatar Sundev, Kazuo Koyama, Sheela Turbek, Michael Wunder, Craig Stricker & Rebecca Safran
Migratory divides are proposed to be catalysts for speciation across a diversity of taxa. However, it is difficult to test the relative contributions of migratory behavior vs. other divergent traits to reproductive isolation. Comparing hybrid zones with and without migratory divides offers a rare opportunity to directly examine the contribution of divergent migratory behavior to reproductive barriers. We show that across replicate sampling transects of two pairs of barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) subspecies, strong reproductive...

Data from: Genomic pedigree reconstruction identifies predictors of mating and reproductive success in an invasive vertebrate

Brenna A Levine, Marlis R Douglas, Amy A Yackel Adams, Bjorn Lardner, Robert N Reed, Julie A Savidge & Michael E Douglas
The persistence of an invasive species is influenced by its reproductive ecology, and a successful control program must operate on this premise. However, the reproductive ecology of invasive species may be enigmatic due to factors that also limit their management, such as cryptic coloration and behavior. We explored the mating and reproductive ecology of the invasive Brown Treesnake (BTS: Boiga irregularis) by reconstructing a multigenerational genomic pedigree based on 654 single nucleotide polymorphisms for a...

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  • United States Geological Survey
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  • Colorado State University
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  • University of Wyoming
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  • Delft University of Technology
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