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INTERMAGNET Technical Reference Manual, Version 5.0.0

Benoit St-Louis, &

DataCite Metadata Schema Documentation for the Publication and Citation of Research Data and Other Research Outputs v4.4

1 Introduction 1.1 The DataCite Consortium 1.2 DataCite Community Participation 1.3 The Metadata Schema 1.4 Version 4.4 Update 2 DataCite Metadata Properties 2.1 Overview 2.2 Citation 2.3 DataCite Properties 3 XML Example 4 XML Schema 5 Other DataCite Services Appendices Appendix 1: Controlled List Definitions Appendix 2: Earlier Version Update Notes Appendix 3: Standard values for unknown information Appendix 4: Version 4.1 Changes in support of software citation Appendix 5: FORCE11 Software Citation Principles Mapping

The effects of ENSO and the North American monsoon on mast seeding in two Rocky Mountain conifer species

Andreas Wion, Ian Pearse, Kyle Rodman, Thomas Veblen & Miranda Redmond
We aimed to disentangle the patterns of synchronous and variable cone production (i.e., masting) and its relationship to climate in two conifer species native to dry forests of western North America. We used cone abscission scars to reconstruct ca. 15 years of recent cone production in Pinus edulis and Pinus ponderosa, and used redundancy analysis to relate time series of annual cone production to climate indices describing the North American monsoon and the El Niño...

Gene flow influences the genomic architecture of local adaptation in six riverine fish species

Yue Shi, Kristen Bouska, Garrett Mckinney, William Dokai, Andrew Bartels, Megan McPhee & Wes Larson
Understanding how gene flow influences adaptive divergence is important for predicting adaptive responses. Theoretical studies suggest that when gene flow is high, clustering of adaptive genes in fewer genomic regions would protect adaptive alleles from recombination and thus be selected for, but few studies have tested it with empirical data. Here, we used RADseq to generate genomic data for six fish species with contrasting life histories from six reaches of the Upper Mississippi River System,...

Data from: Integrating tracking and resight data enables unbiased inferences about migratory connectivity and winter range survival from archival tags

Clark Rushing, Aimee Van Tatenhove, Andrew Sharp, Viviana Ruiz-Gutierrez, Mary Freeman, Paul Sykes, Aaron Given & Scott Sillett
Archival geolocators have transformed the study of small, migratory organisms but analysis of data from these devices requires bias correction because tags are only recovered from individuals that survive and are re-captured at their tagging location. Data and code provided in this repository can be used to replicate the simulation and Painted Bunting case study results presented by Rushing et al. (2021) showing that integrating geolocator recovery data and mark–resight data enables unbiased estimates of...

Data from: A food web including parasites for kelp forests of the Santa Barbara Channel, California

Dana Morton, Cristiana Antonino, Farallon Broughton, Dykman Lauren, Armand Kuris & Kevin Lafferty
We built a high-resolution topological food web for the kelp forests of the Santa Barbara Channel, California, USA that includes parasites and significantly improves resolution compared to previous webs. The 1,098 nodes and 21,956 links in the web describe an economically, socially, and ecologically vital system. Nodes are broken into life-stages. There are 549 free-living life-stages (comprising 492 species from 21 Phyla) and 549 parasitic life-stages (comprising 450 species from 10 Phyla). Links represent three...

Causes of delayed outbreak responses and their impacts on epidemic spread

Yun Tao, Matthew Ferrari, Katriona Shea, William Probeert, Michael Runge, Kevin Lafferty & Michael Tildesley
Livestock diseases have devastating consequences economically, socially, and politically across the globe. In certain systems, pathogens remain viable after host death, which enables residual transmissions from infected carcasses. Rapid culling and carcass disposal are well-established strategies for stamping out an outbreak and limiting its impact, however, wait-times for these procedures, i.e., response delays, are typically farm-specific and time-varying due to logistical constraints. Failing to incorporate variable response delays in epidemiological models may understate outbreak projections...

Short-term responses to a human-altered landscape do not affect fat dynamics of a migratory ungulate

Samantha Dwinnell, Hall Sawyer, , Jill Randall, Rusty Kaiser, Mark Thonhoff, Gary Fralick & Kevin Monteith
According to risk-sensitive foraging theory, animals should make foraging decisions that balance nutritional costs and gains to promote fitness. Human disturbance is a form of perceived risk that can prompt avoidance of risky habitat over the acquisition of food. Consequently, behavioral responses to perceived risk could induce nutritional costs. Population declines often coincide with increases in human disturbance, which likely is associated with direct and indirect habitat loss. Nevertheless, behavioral and physiological responses to perceived...

Species mixture effects and climate influence growth, recruitment and mortality in Interior West U.S.A. Populus tremuloides - conifer communities

Christopher Looney, Wilfred Previant, John Bradford & Linda Nagel
Tree-species mixture effects (e.g., complementarity and facilitation) have been found to increase individual-tree productivity, lessen mortality, and improve recruitment in forests worldwide. By promoting more efficient and complete resource use, mixture effects may also lessen individual-tree-level water stress, thus improving drought-resistance. We investigated the influence of mixture effects on tree productivity, mortality, and recruitment across broad compositional and moisture gradients in high-elevation Interior West US mixed-conifer communities, where Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen) is the major...

Data from: Hybridization alters growth and migratory life history expression of native trout

Jeffrey T. Strait, Lisa A. Eby, Ryan P. Kovach, Clint C. Muhlfeld, Matthew C. Boyer, Stephen J. Amish, Seth Smith, Winsor H. Lowe & Gordon Luikart
Human-mediated hybridization threatens many native species, but the effects of introgressive hybridization on life history expression are rarely quantified, especially in vertebrates. We quantified the effects of non-native rainbow trout admixture on important life history traits including growth and partial migration behavior in three populations of westslope cutthroat trout over five years. Rainbow trout admixture was associated with increased summer growth rates in all populations, and decreased spring growth rates in two populations with cooler...

Conspecific and congeneric interactions shape increasing rates of breeding dispersal of northern spotted owls

Julianna Jenkins, Damon Lesmeister, Eric Forsman, Katie Dugger, Steven Ackers, Lawrence Andrews, Scott Gremel, Bruce Hollen, Chris McCafferty, M. Shane Pruett, Janice Reid, Stan Sovern & J. David Wiens
Breeding dispersal, the movement from one breeding territory to another, is rare for philopatric species that evolved within relatively stable environments, such as the old-growth coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest. While dispersal is not inherently maladaptive, the consequences of increased dispersal on population dynamics in populations whose historical dispersal rates are low could be significant, particularly for a declining species. We examined rates and possible causes of breeding dispersal based on a sample of...

Disease or drought: Environmental fluctuations release zebra from a potential pathogen-triggered ecological trap

Yen-Hua Huang, Hendrina Joel, Martina Küsters, Zoe Barandongo, Claudine Cloete, Axel Hartmann, Pauline Kamath, Werner Kilian, John Mfune, Gabriel Shatumbu, Royi Zidon, Wayne Getz & Wendy Turner
When a transmission hotspot for an environmentally persistent pathogen establishes in otherwise high-quality habitat, the disease may exert a strong impact on a host population. However, fluctuating environmental conditions lead to heterogeneity in habitat quality and animal habitat preference, which may interrupt the overlap between selected and risky habitats. We evaluated spatiotemporal patterns in anthrax mortalities in a plains zebra (Equus quagga) population in Etosha National Park, Namibia, incorporating remote-sensing and host telemetry data. A...

Local fruit availability and en route wind conditions are poor predictors of bird abundance and composition during fall migration in coastal Yucatán Peninsula

Richard Feldman, Antonio Celis Murillo, Jill Deppe & Alfredo Dorantes Euan
In migratory stopover habitats, bird abundance and composition change on a near daily basis. On any given day, the local bird community should reflect local environmental conditions but also the environments that birds encountered previously along their migratory route. For example, during fall migration, the coast of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico receives birds that have just crossed the Gulf of Mexico and their abundance and composition may be associated with regional factors such as...

Behavioral patterns of bats at a wind turbine events

Shifra Goldenberg, Paul Cryan, P. Marcos Gorresen & Lee Jay Fingersh
Bat fatalities at wind energy facilities in North America are predominantly comprised of migratory, tree-dependent species, but it is unclear why these bats are at higher risk. Factors influencing bat susceptibility to wind turbines might be revealed by temporal patterns in their behaviors around these dynamic landscape structures. In northern temperate zones fatalities occur mostly from July through October, but whether this reflects seasonally variable behaviors, passage of migrants, or some combination of factors remains...

Genetic diversity in two insular populations of bobcats (Lynx rufus)

Duane Diefenbach, Cassandra Miller-Butterworth, Jessie Edson, Leslie Hansen, James Jordan, Tess Gingery & Amy Russell
We documented changes in genetic diversity in an isolated, reintroduced population of bobcats on Cumberland Island (CUIS), Georgia, USA, compared to another bobcat population on Kiawah Island, South Carolina, USA, that was naturally established and experiences limited immigration from the mainland. We compared the predictions of a novel population viability analysis (PVA) to empirical estimates of abundance and genetic diversity on CUIS and used our PVA to identify management actions that are likely to support...

Do fine-scale experiments underestimate predator consumption rates?

Lindsey Bruckerhoff, Casey Pennock & Keith Gido
Understanding ecological processes across spatial scales helps link observations and predictions from experiments to ecological patterns occurring at coarser scales relevant to management and conservation. Using fish, we experimentally manipulated the size of arenas to test the spatial scaling of predator-prey interactions. We measured variation in predator consumption and prey behavior (prey aggregation, spatial overlap with predators, and movement) across arena sizes. Variation in prey behavior across arena sizes was hypothesized to drive consumption patterns...

Lake food webs: Species invasion progressively disrupts the trophic structure of native food webs

Charles Wainright, Clint Muhlfeld, James Elser, Samuel Bourret & Shawn Devlin
Species invasions can have substantial impacts on native species and ecosystems, with important consequences for biodiversity. How these disturbances drive changes in the trophic structure of native food webs through time is poorly understood. Here, we quantify trophic disruption in freshwater food webs to invasion by an apex fish predator, lake trout, using an extensive stable isotope dataset across a natural gradient of uninvaded and invaded lakes in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA. Lake trout...

Vegetation characteristics and precipitation jointly influence grassland bird abundance beyond the effects of grazing management

Kristin Davis, David Augustine, Adrian Monroe & Cameron Aldridge
Grassland birds have experienced some of the steepest population declines of any guild of birds in North America. The shortgrass steppe contains some of North America’s most-intact grasslands, which makes the region particularly important for these species. Grassland birds differentially respond to variation in vegetation structure generated by spatiotemporally-varying disturbance like grazing management. However, understanding how species respond to characteristics beyond vegetation structure or grazing could better inform management for these species in the shortgrass...

Data from: Invasive hybridization has variable effects on survival among salmonid populations

Jeffrey Strait, Ryan Kovach, Lisa Eby, Clint Muhlfeld, Matthew Boyer, Stephen Amish, Paul Lukacs, Winsor Lowe & Gordon Luikart
Human-mediated hybridization threatens global biodiversity, but the fitness consequences of hybridization are poorly understood, especially in vertebrates. We used capture-recapture data from 5,249 individuals in three hybridizing populations of invasive rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and native cutthroat trout (O. clarkii) to quantify the effects of rainbow trout genetic admixture and environmental conditions on survival. Seasonal variation in environmental conditions interacted with individual admixture to influence seasonal survival. Overall, annual survival declined with admixture at the...

Functional traits reveal the dominant drivers of long‐term community change across a North American Great Lake

James Sinclair, Michael Fraker, James Hood, Kenneth Frank, Mark DuFour, Ann Marie Gorman & Stuart Ludsin
The datasets here were used to determine annual sentinel fish species and trait composition in Lake Erie's western and central basins during 1969-2018 in relation to multiple anthropogenic stressors. Here, we provide three datasets, which are used in the paper by Sinclair et al. titled: "Functional traits reveal the dominant drivers of long-term community change across a North American Great Lake". Each dataset is provided as a separate tab in a single Excel worksheet. The...

Convergence of undulatory swimming kinematics across a diversity of fishes

Elsa Goerig, Valentina Di Santo, Dylan K. Wainwright, Theodore Castro-Santos, James Liao, Otar Akanyeti & George Lauder
Fishes exhibit an astounding diversity of locomotor behaviors, from classic swimming with their body and fins to jumping, flying, walking, and burrowing. Fishes that use their body and caudal fin (BCF) during undulatory swimming have been traditionally divided into modes based on the length of the propulsive body wave and the ratio of head:tail oscillation amplitude: anguilliform, sub-carangiform, carangiform and thunniform. This classification was first proposed based on key morphological traits, such as body stiffness...

Functional connectivity in a continuously distributed, migratory species as revealed by landscape genomics

Melanie E. F. LaCava, Roderick B. Gagne, Kyle D. Gustafson, Sara J. Oyler-McCance, Kevin L. Monteith, Hall Sawyer, Matthew J. Kauffman, Daniel J. Thiele & Holly B. Ernest
Maintaining functional connectivity is critical for the long-term conservation of wildlife populations. Landscape genomics provides an opportunity to assess long-term functional connectivity by relating environmental variables to spatial patterns of genomic variation resulting from generations of movement, dispersal, and mating behaviors. Identifying landscape features associated with gene flow at large geographic scales for highly mobile species is becoming increasingly possible due to more accessible genomic approaches, improved analytical methods, and enhanced computational power. We characterized...

Sea otter sequence capture project data files

Annabel Beichman, Pooneh Kalhori, Christopher Kyriazis, Amber De Vries, Sergio Nigenda-Morales, Klaus-Peter Koepfli, Gisela Heckel, Yolanda Schramm, Andres Moreno-Estrada, Douglas Kennett, Mark Hylkema, James Bodkin, Kirk Lohmueller & Robert Wayne
Extinction or severe population contractions are rarely uniform across an entire species. However, because of the rapid onset of the fur trade in the 18th and 19th centuries, sea otters (Enhydra lutris) were systematically hunted to near extinction across their entire Northern Pacific range. Many sea otter populations were driven fully extinct, and the populations that survived suffered a rapid decline from 10-20,000 individuals per population to fewer than one hundred survivors. Each surviving remnant...

DataCite to Dublin Core Mapping v4.4.

On the occasion of the release of v4.4 of the DataCite Metadata Schema its Metadata Working Group has updated the mapping to Dublin Core. This replaces the mapping in the Appendix of the DataCite-MetadataKernel v2.1. The mapping can be used to convert records described following version 4.4 of the DataCite Metadata Schema into records that comply with the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative Schema.

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  • United States Geological Survey
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