76 Works

Directional selection shifts trait distributions of planted species in dryland restoration

Kathleen Balazs, Seth Munson, Caroline A. Havrilla & Brad Butterfield
1. The match between species trait values and local abiotic filters can restrict community membership. An often-implicit assumption of this relationship is that abiotic filters select for a single locally optimal strategy, though difficulty in isolating effects of the abiotic environment from those of dispersal limitation and biotic interactions has resulted in few empirical tests of this assumption. Similar constraints have made it difficult to assess whether the type and intensity of abiotic filters shift...

Predicted distribution of a rare and understudied forest carnivore: Humboldt martens (Martes caurina humboldtensis)

Katie Moriarty, Joel Thompson, Matthew Delheimer, Brent Barry, Mark Linnell, Taal Levi, Keith Hamm, Desiree Early, Holly Gamblin, Micaela Szykman-Gunther, Jordan Ellison, Janet Prevey, Jennifer Hartman & Raymond Davis
Many mammalian species have experienced range contractions. Following a reduction in distribution that has resulted in apparently small and disjunct populations, the Humboldt marten (Martes caurina humboldtensis) was recently designated as federally Threatened and state Endangered. This subspecies of Pacific marten occurring in coastal Oregon and northern California, also known as coastal martens, appear unlike martens that occur in snow-associated regions in that vegetation associations appear to differ widely between Humboldt marten populations. We expected...

Data from: A geology and geodesy based model of dynamic earthquake rupture on the Rodgers Creek-Hayward-Calaveras fault system, California

Michael Barall, Ruth Harris, David Lockner, Diane Moore, Ponce David, Russell Graymer, Gareth Funning, Carolyn Morrow, Christodoulos Kyriakopoulos & Donna Eberhart-Phillips
The Hayward fault in California's San Francisco Bay area produces large earthquakes, with the last occurring in 1868. We examine how physics-based dynamic rupture modeling can be used to numerically simulate large earthquakes on not only the Hayward fault, but also its connected companions to the north and south, the Rodgers Creek and Calaveras faults. Equipped with a wealth of images of this fault system, including those of its 3D geology and 3D geometry, in...

Data to replicate: Forecasting community reassembly using climate-linked spatio-temporal ecosystem models

James Thorson, Mayumi Arimitsu, Lewis Barnett, Wei Cheng, Lisa Eisner, Alan Haynie, Albert Hermann, Kirstin Holsman, David Kimmel, Mike Lomas, Jon Richar & Elizabeth Siddon
Ecosystems are increasingly impacted by human activities, altering linkages among physical and biological components. Spatial community reassembly occurs when these human impacts modify the spatial overlap between system components, and there is need for practical tools to forecast spatial community reassembly at landscape scales using monitoring data. To illustrate a new approach, we extend a generalization of empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, which involves a spatio-temporal ecosystem model that approximates coupled physical, biological, and human...

Structure from motion of the Ichilo riverbanks in Puerto Villarroel, Bolivia

Kattia Rubi Arnez Ferrel, Jonathan Mark Nelson & Yasuyuki Shimizu
Structure from motion photogrametry was used to survey the banks of the Ichilo river, in the city of Puerto Villarroel in Bolivia. The surveyed areas was of aproximately 300 hectares of terrain. A DJI Phantom 4 Pro and a DJI Mavic Pro was used for taking pictures. A total of 44 GCPs were marked along the riverbanks of the Ichilo and their coordinates were measured using a Real-time Kinematic (RTK) GPS unit. After the GCPs...

Behavioral responses across a mosaic of ecosystem states restructure a sea otter-urchin trophic cascade

Joshua Smith, Joseph Tomoleoni, Michelle Staedler, Sophia Lyon, Jessica Fujii & Tim M. Tinker
Consumer and predator foraging behavior can impart profound trait-mediated constraints on community regulation that scale-up to influence the structure and stability of ecosystems. Here we demonstrate how the behavioral response of an apex predator to changes in prey behavior and condition can dramatically alter the role and relative contribution of top-down forcing, depending on the spatial organization of ecosystem states. In this study, a rapid and dramatic decline in the abundance of a meso-predator (Pycnopodia...

Data from: The utility of environmental DNA from sediment and water samples for recovery of observed plant and animal species from four Mojave Desert springs

MAURA PALACIOS MEJIA, Emily Curd, Kiumars Edalati, Mark Renshaw, Roy Dunn, Daniel Potter, Naomi Fraga, Jenna Moore, Justin Saiz, Robert Wayne & Sophie Parker
Background: Mojave Desert springs are fragile ecosystems, hosting endemic plants and animals, which are threatened by the increasing human demand for water and climate change. To develop management practices that will protect the groundwater-dependent ecosystems at Mojave Desert springs, real-time, low cost biodiversity monitoring and assessments are required. Environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding uses DNA shed from organisms (e.g. skin cells, feces, pollen, etc.) that is present in water, air, soil, or sediment samples to assess...

Biodiversity effects on grape quality depend on variety and management intensity

Magdalena Steiner, James Benjamin Grace & Sven Bacher
Interactions between plants can be beneficial, detrimental or neutral. In agricultural systems competition between crop and spontaneous vegetation is a major concern. We evaluated the relative support for three non-exclusive ecological hypotheses about interactions between crop and spontaneous plants based on competition, complementarity or facilitation. The study was conducted in Swiss vineyards with different vegetation management intensities. Thirty-three vineyards planted with two different grape varieties were studied over 3 years to determine whether low-intensity vegetation...

Changes in species composition mediate direct effects of climate change on future fire regimes of boreal forests in northeastern China

Chao Huang, Hong He, Yu Liang, Todd Hawbaker, Paul Henne, Wenru Xu, Peng Gong & Zhi Zhu
1. Direct effects of climate change (i.e., temperature rise, changes in seasonal precipitation, wind patterns, and atmospheric stability) affect fire regimes of boreal forests by altering fire behavior, fire seasons, and fuel moisture. Climate change also alters species composition and fuel characteristics, which subsequently alter fire regimes. However, indirect effects of climate change are often simplified or neglected in the direct climate-fire relationship models and dynamic global vegetation models. This may result in high uncertainties...

Risky movements? Natal dispersal does not decrease survival of a large herbivore

Eric Long, Duane Diefenbach, Clayton Lutz, Bret Wallingford & Christopher Rosenberry
Natal dispersal is assumed to be a particularly risky movement behavior as individuals transfer, often long distances, from birth site to site of potential first reproduction. Though, because this behavior persists in populations, it is assumed that dispersal increases the fitness of individuals despite the potential for increased risk of mortality. The extent of dispersal risk, however, has rarely been tested, especially for large mammals. Therefore, we aimed to test the relationship between dispersal and...

Correlates of substitution rate variation in a robust Procellariiform seabird phylogeny

Andrea Estandia, Terry Chesser, Helen James, Max Levy, Joan Ferrer-Obiol, Vincent Bretagnolle, Jacob González-Solís & Andreanna Welch
Molecular substitution rates vary among branches and can lead to inaccurate reconstructions of evolutionary relationships and obscure the true phylogeny of affected clades. Body mass is often assumed to have a major influence on substitution rate, though other factors such as population size, life history traits, and flight demands are also thought to have an influence. Birds of the order Procellariiformes—which encompasses petrels, storm-petrels and albatrosses—show a striking 900-fold difference in body mass between the...

DataCite to Dublin Core Mapping v4.4.

On the occasion of the release of v4.4 of the DataCite Metadata Schema its Metadata Working Group has updated the mapping to Dublin Core. This replaces the mapping in the Appendix of the DataCite-MetadataKernel v2.1. The mapping can be used to convert records described following version 4.4 of the DataCite Metadata Schema into records that comply with the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative Schema.

Public Geological Materials Repository Directory

Michaela R. Johnson
Overview This directory was developed to provide discovery information for anyone looking for publicly accessible repositories that house geological materials in the U.S. and Canada. In addition, this resource is intended to be a tool to facilitate a community of practice. The need for the directory was identified during planning for and follow-up from a drill core repository webinar series in Spring 2020 for public repository curators and staff in the U.S. and Canada hosted...

Invasion and Global Change Meta-analysis Data

Bianca E. Lopez, Jenica M. Allen, Jeffrey S. Dukes, Jonathan Lenoir, Montserat Vila, Dana M. Blumenthal, Evelyn M. Beaury, Emily J. Fusco, Toni Lyn Morelli, Cascade J. B. Sorte & Bethany A. Bradley
We conducted a global meta-analysis to investigate invasions, abiotic global environmental changes, and their combined effects on native species, communities, and ecosystems.We searched the Web of Science Core Collection for articles and reviews that were available in English through September 30, 2020. Search terms were chosen to identify papers reporting impacts of invasions with one of six abiotic global environmental changes (GECs: warming, nitrogen deposition, O2 depletion, drought, CO2 addition, and altered pH). We assessed...

Global resorption efficiencies of trace elements in leaves of terrestrial plants

Hao Chen, Sasha Reed, Xiao-Tao Lü, Kongcao Xiao, Kelin Wang & Dejun Li
1. Leaf nutrient resorption is a critical nutrient conservation strategy. Previous studies focus mainly on resorption patterns of macronutrients, but resorption patterns of trace elements remain poorly understood. 2. A meta-analysis was conducted to explore the general patterns of the leaf resorption of eight trace elements [i.e., copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn), boron (B), manganese (Mn), sodium (Na), aluminum (Al), and iron (Fe)], and a macronutrient [i.e., sulfur (S)] using data collected from 53...

Combined influence of intrinsic and environmental factors in shaping productivity in a small pelagic gull, the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla

Aly McKnight, David Irons, Cynthia Loftin, Shawn McKinney & Brian Olsen
While we have a good understanding in many systems of the effects of single variable changes on organisms, we understand far less about how variables act in concert to affect living systems, where interactions among variables can lead to unanticipated results. We used mixed-effect models to evaluate the effects of multiple variables that we expected to play a role in the early reproductive stages of a North Pacific seabird, the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla, during...

Loss of branches due to winter storms could favor deciduousness in oaks

Richard Karban & Ian Pearse
Premise of the study. Ecologists have an incomplete understanding of the factors that select for deciduous, evergreen, and marcescent leaf habits. Evergreens have more opportunities for photosynthesis but may experience costs when abiotic conditions are unfavorable such as during ice and windstorms. Methods. We documented branch loss for species of oaks (Quercus spp) in a common garden in California during an unusual windstorm. Key Results. Branches of marcescent trees were more likely to break during...

Eagles enter rotor-swept zones of wind turbines at rates that vary by turbine

Christopher McClure, Brian Rolek, Melissa Braham, Tricia Miller, Adam Duerr, Jennifer McCabe, Leah Dunn & Todd Katzner
There is increasing pressure on wind energy facilities to manage or mitigate for wildlife collisions. However, little information exists regarding spatial and temporal variation in collision rates, meaning that mitigation is most often a blanket prescription. To address this knowledge gap, we evaluated variation among turbines and months in an aspect of collision risk—probability of entry by an eagle into a rotor swept zone (hereafter, ‘probability of entry’). We examined 10,222 eagle flight paths identified...

Forecasting NDVI in the Galapagos

Noah Charney, Guillaume Bastille-Rousseau, Charles Yackulic, Stephen Blake & James Gibbs
Forecasting ecosystem response to climate change is critical for guiding policy-making but challenging due to: complicated relationships between microclimates and regional climates; species’ responses that are driven by extremes rather than averages; the multifaceted nature of species’ interactions; and the lack of historical analogs to future climates. Given these challenges, even model systems such as the Galapagos Islands, a world-famous biodiversity hotspot and World Heritage Site, lack clear forecasts for future environmental change. Here, we...

Geographic variation in dispersal of western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) populations

Alberto Macías-Duarte & Courtney J. Conway
Dispersal is one of the key elements of species’ metapopulation dynamics and, hence, influences global conservation status. Furthermore, determining the geographic variation in magnitude and direction of dispersal throughout a species’ distribution may expand our understanding of the causes of population declines in species of conservation concern. For instance, western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) populations have declined at the northern and eastern edge of their breeding distribution during the 20th century. In the same...

Data from: Intraspecific variation in incubation behaviors along a latitudinal gradient is driven by nest microclimate and selection on neonate quality

Carl Lundblad & Courtney Conway
The strategies by which animals allocate reproductive effort across their lifetimes vary, and the causes of variation in those strategies are actively debated. In birds, most research has focused heavily on variation in clutch size and fecundity, but incubation behavior and other functionally related traits have received less attention. Variation in incubation period duration is notable because time-dependent sources of clutch mortality should impose strong directional selection to minimize the incubation period. However, life-history theory...

Growth model used in Guzy et al. Increased growth rates of stream salamanders following forest harvesting

Jacquelyn Guzy, Brian Halstead, Kelly Halloran, Jessica Homyack & John D. Willson
Timber harvesting can influence headwater streams by altering stream productivity, with cascading effects on the food web and predators within, including stream salamanders. Although studies have examined shifts in occupancy or abundance following timber harvest, few examine sublethal effects such as changes in growth and demography. To examine the effect of upland harvesting on growth of the stream-associated Ouachita dusky salamander (Desmognathus brimleyorum), we used capture-mark-recapture over three years at three headwater streams embedded in...

Data from: Drivers of site fidelity in ungulates

Thomas Morrison, Jerod Merkel, J. Grant Hopcraft, Ellen Aikens, Jeffrey Beck, Randall Boone, Alyson Courtemanch, Samantha Dwinnell, Sue Fairbanks, Brad Griffith, Arthur Middleton, Kevin Monteith, Brendan Oates, Louise Riotte-Lambert, Hall Sawyer, Kurt Smith, Jared Stabach, Kaitlyn Taylor & Matthew Kauffman
While the tendency to return to previously visited locations – termed ‘site fidelity’ – is common in animals, the cause of this behaviour is not well understood. One hypothesis is that site fidelity is shaped by an animal’s environment, such that animals living in landscapes with predictable resources have stronger site fidelity. Site fidelity may also be conditional on the success of animals’ recent visits to that location, and it may become stronger with age...

Temperature‐associated decreases in demographic rates of Afrotropical bird species over 30 years

Montague H. C. Neate‐Clegg, Thomas R. Stanley, Çağan H. Şekercioğlu & William D. Newmark
Tropical mountains harbor globally significant levels of biodiversity and endemism. Climate change threatens many tropical montane species, yet little research has assessed the effects of climate change on the demographic rates of tropical species, particularly in the Afrotropics. Here, we report on the demographic rates of 21 Afrotropical bird species over 30 years in montane forests in Tanzania. We used mark-recapture analyses to model rates of population growth, recruitment, and apparent survival as functions of...

Data for: Long-term surveys support declines in early-season forest plants used by bumble bees

John Mola, Leif Richardson, Greg Spyreas, David Zaya & Ian Pearse
Populations of bumble bees and other pollinators have declined over the past several decades due to numerous threats, including habitat loss and degradation. However, we can rarely investigate the role of resource loss due to a lack of detailed long-term records of forage plants and habitats. We use 22-year repeated surveys of more than 262 sites located in grassland, forest, and wetland habitats across Illinois, USA to explore how the abundance and richness of bumble...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    76

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    71
  • Text
    4
  • Service
    1

Affiliations

  • United States Geological Survey
    76
  • Colorado State University
    6
  • Columbia University
    4
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    4
  • Utah State University
    3
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    3
  • Oregon State University
    3
  • University of Wyoming
    3
  • University of Maine
    3
  • University of California, Berkeley
    3