45 Works

Data from: Cyclic bouts of extreme bradycardia counteract the highmetabolism of frugivorous bats

M. Teague O'Mara, Martin Wikelski, Christian C. Voigt, Andries Ter Maat, Henry S. Pollock, Gary Burness, Lanna M. Desantis, Dina K. N. Dechmann & Dina KN Dechmann
Active flight requires the ability to efficiently fuel bursts of costly locomotion while maximizing energy conservation during non-flying times. We took a multi-faceted approach to estimate how fruit-eating bats (Uroderma bilobatum) manage a high-energy lifestyle fueled primarily by fig juice. Miniaturized heart rate telemetry shows that they use a novel, cyclic, bradycardic state that reduces daily energetic expenditure by 10% and counteracts heart rates as high as 900 bpm during flight. Uroderma bilobatum support flight...

Data from: Plant-soil feedback and the maintenance of diversity in Mediterranean-climate shrublands

Francois P. Teste, Paul Kardol, Benjamin L. Turner, David A. Wardle, Graham Zemunik, Michael Renton & Etienne Laliberté
Soil biota influence plant performance through plant-soil feedback, but it is unclear whether the strength of such feedback depends on plant traits and whether plant-soil feedback drives local plant diversity. We grew 16 co-occurring plant species with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies from hyperdiverse Australian shrublands and exposed them to soil biota from under their own or other plant species. Plant responses to soil biota varied according to their nutrient-acquisition strategy, including positive feedback for ectomycorrhizal plants...

Data from: Varyingly hungry caterpillars: predictive models and foliar chemistry suggest how to eat a rainforest

Simon T. Segar, Martin Volf, Brus Isua, Mentap Sisol, Conor M. Redmond, Margaret E. Rosati, Bradley Gewa, Kenneth Molem, Chris Dahl, Jeremy D. Holloway, Yves Basset, Scott E. Miller, George D. Weiblen, Juha-Pekka Salminen & Vojtech Novotny
A long-term goal in evolutionary ecology is to explain the incredible diversity of insect herbivores and patterns of plant host use in speciose groups like tropical Lepidoptera. Here we used standardised food-web data, multigene phylogenies of both trophic levels and plant chemistry data to model interactions between Lepidoptera larvae (caterpillars) from two lineages (Geometridae and Pyraloidea) and plants in species-rich lowland rainforest in New Guinea. Model parameters were used to make and test blind predictions...

Data from: Higher predation risk for insect prey at low latitudes and elevations

Tomas Roslin, Bess Hardwick, Vojtech Novotny, William K. Petry, Nigel R. Andrew, Ashley Asmus, Isabel C. Barrio, Yves Basset, Andrea Larissa Boesing, Timothy C. Bonebrake, Erin K. Cameron, Wesley Dáttilo, David A. Donoso, Pavel Drozd, Claudia L. Gray, David S. Hik, Sarah J. Hill, Tapani Hopkins, Shuyin Huang, Bonny Koane, Benita Laird-Hopkins, Liisa Laukkanen, Owen T. Lewis, Sol Milne, Isaiah Mwesige … & Eleanor M. Slade
Biotic interactions underlie ecosystem structure and function, but predicting interaction outcomes is difficult. We tested the hypothesis that biotic interaction strength increases toward the equator, using a global experiment with model caterpillars to measure predation risk. Across an 11,660-kilometer latitudinal gradient spanning six continents, we found increasing predation toward the equator, with a parallel pattern of increasing predation toward lower elevations. Patterns across both latitude and elevation were driven by arthropod predators, with no systematic...

Data from: Effective dispersal of Caribbean reef fish is smaller than current spacing among marine protected areas

Diana M. Beltran, Nikolaos V. Schizas, Richard S. Appeldoorn & Carlos Prada
The oceans are deteriorating at a fast pace. Conservation measures, such as Marine Protected Areas, are being implemented to relieve areas from local stressors and allow populations to restore to natural levels. Successful networks of MPAs operate if the space among MPAs is smaller than the dispersal capacity of the species under protection. We studied connectivity patterns across populations in a series of MPAs in the common yellowhead Jawfish, Opistognathus aurifrons. Using the power of...

Data from: Carrion fly-derived DNA metabarcoding is an effective tool for mammal surveys: evidence from a known tropical mammal community

Torrey W. Rodgers, Charles C. Y. Xu, Jacalyn Giacalone, Karen M. Kapheim, Kristin Saltonstall, Marta Vargas, Douglas W. Yu, Panu Somervuo, W. Owen McMillan & Patrick A. Jansen
Metabarcoding of vertebrate DNA derived from carrion flies has been proposed as a promising tool for biodiversity monitoring. To evaluate its efficacy, we conducted metabarcoding surveys of carrion flies on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama, which has a well-known mammal community, and compared our results against diurnal transect counts and camera-trapping. We collected 1084 flies in 29 sampling days, conducted metabarcoding with mammal-specific (16S) and vertebrate-specific (12S) primers, and sequenced amplicons on Illumina MiSeq. For...

Data from: Lianas reduce community-level canopy tree reproduction in a Panamanian forest

María M. García León, Laura Martínez Izquierdo, Felipe Nery Arantes Mello, Jennifer S. Powers & Stefan A. Schnitzer
Lianas are a key component of tropical forests, where they compete intensely with trees, reducing tree recruitment, growth and survival. One of the most important potential outcomes of liana competition is the reduction of tree reproduction; however, no previous study has experimentally determined the effects of lianas on tree reproduction beyond a single tree species. We used a large-scale liana removal experiment to quantify the effect of lianas on community-level canopy and understorey tree and...

Data from: Facultative pupal mating in Heliconius erato: implications for mate choice, female preference, and speciation

Timothy J. Thurman, Emily Brodie, Elizabeth Evans & William Owen McMillan
Mating systems have broad impacts on how sexual selection and mate choice operate within a species, but studies of mating behavior in the laboratory may not reflect how these processes occur in the wild. Here, we examined the mating behavior of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato in the field by releasing larvae and virgin females and observing how they mated. H. erato is considered a pupal-mating species (i.e., males mate with females as they emerge...

Data from: High tolerance of tropical sapling growth and gas exchange to moderate warming

Martijn Slot & Klaus Winter
The effects of global warming on tropical forest growth and carbon storage are uncertain. While observations on canopy trees indicate negative correlations between temperature and growth, some seedling studies suggest the opposite. These contrasting results may reflect ontogenetic differences in temperature responses, or differences between the performance of potted plants under controlled conditions and plants under more variable conditions in the field. To try to bridge the gap between highly-controlled experiments on small seedlings and...

Data from: Toward a geography of omnivory: omnivores increase carnivory when sodium is limiting

Natalie A. Clay, Richard J. Lehrter & Michael Kaspari
1. Toward understanding the geography of omnivory, we tested three hypotheses that predict the proportion of animal tissue consumed: The Sodium Limitation Hypothesis predicts that omnivores increase animal consumption in Na-poor environments because Na bioaccumulates from plants to predators; thus, heterotrophs are Na-rich sources. The Nitrogen Limitation and Habitat Productivity Hypotheses use the same logic to predict more animal consumption in N-poor and productive environments respectively. 2. Omnivory is a common trophic strategy, but what...

Data from: Species-specific flowering cues among general flowering Shorea species at the Pasoh Research Forest, Malaysia

Yu-Yun Chen, Akiko Satake, I-Fang Sun, Yoshiko Kosugi, Makoto Tani, Shinya Numata, Stephen P. Hubbell, Christine Fletcher, Nur Supardi Md.Noor, S. Joseph Wright &
1.In a unique phenomenon restricted to the ever wet forests of Southeast Asia, hundreds of species from dozens of plant families reproduce synchronously at irregular, multi-year intervals. The proximate environmental cues that synchronize these general flowering events have not been evaluated systematically because there have been no long-term, high temporal-resolution, species-level records from the region. 2.We present 13 years of weekly flowering records for five Shorea species as well as daily temperature and rainfall records...

Data from: Soil fertility shapes belowground food webs across a regional climate gradient

Etienne Laliberté, Paul Kardol, Raphael K. Didham, François P. Teste, Benjamin L. Turner & David A. Wardle
Changes in soil fertility during pedogenesis affect the quantity and quality of resources entering the belowground subsystem. Climate governs pedogenesis, yet how climate modulates responses of soil food webs to soil ageing remains unexplored because of the paucity of appropriate model systems. We characterised soil food webs along each of four retrogressive soil chronosequences situated across a strong regional climate gradient to show that belowground communities are predominantly shaped by changes in fertility rather than...

Data from: Greater root phosphatase activity in nitrogen-fixing rhizobial but not actinorhizal plants with declining phosphorus availability

Guochen Kenny Png, Benjamin L. Turner, Felipe E. Albornoz, Patrick E. Hayes, Hans Lambers & Etienne Laliberté
1. The abundance of nitrogen (N)-fixing plants in ecosystems where phosphorus (P) limits plant productivity poses a paradox because N fixation entails a high P cost. One explanation for this paradox is that the N-fixing strategy allows greater root phosphatase activity to enhance P acquisition from organic sources, but evidence to support this contention is limited. 2. We measured root phosphomonoesterase (PME) activity of 10 N-fixing species, including rhizobial legumes and actinorhizal Allocasuarina species, and...

Data from: No evidence for maintenance of a sympatric Heliconius species barrier by chromosomal inversions

John W. Davey, Sarah L. Barker, Pasi M. Rastas, Ana Pinharanda, Simon H. Martin, Richard Durbin, W. Owen McMillan, Richard M. Merrill & Chris D. Jiggins
Mechanisms that suppress recombination are known to help maintain species barriers by preventing the breakup of coadapted gene combinations. The sympatric butterfly species Heliconius melpomene and Heliconius cydno are separated by many strong barriers, but the species still hybridize infrequently in the wild, and around 40% of the genome is influenced by introgression. We tested the hypothesis that genetic barriers between the species are maintained by inversions or other mechanisms that reduce between-species recombination rate....

Data from: Cascading effects of predator activity on tick-borne disease risk

Tim R. Hofmeester, Patrick A. Jansen, Hendrikus J. Wijnen, Elena C. Coipan, Manoj Fonville, Herbert H.T. Prins, Hein Sprong, Sip E. Van Wieren, Herbert H. T. Prins & Sipke E. Van Wieren
Predators and competitors of vertebrates can in theory reduce the density of infected nymphs (DIN)—an often-used measure of tick-borne disease risk—by lowering the density of reservoir-competent hosts and/or the tick burden on reservoir-competent hosts. We investigated this possible indirect effect of predators by comparing data from 20 forest plots across the Netherlands that varied in predator abundance. In each plot, we measured the density of questing Ixodes ricinus nymphs (DON), DIN for three pathogens, rodent...

Data from: Population structure and connectivity of the mountainous star coral, Orbicella faveolata, throughout the wider Caribbean region

John P. Rippe, Mikhail V. Matz, Elizabeth A. Green, Mónica Medina, Nida Z. Khawaja, Thanapat Pongwarin, Jorge H. Pinzón C., Karl D. Castillo & Sarah W. Davies
As coral reefs continue to decline worldwide, it becomes ever more necessary to understand the connectivity between coral populations to develop efficient management strategies facilitating survival and adaptation of coral reefs in the future. Orbicella faveolata is one of the most important reef-building corals in the Caribbean and has recently experienced severe population reductions. Here, we utilize a panel of nine microsatellite loci to evaluate the genetic structure of O. faveolata and to infer connectivity...

Data from: Host-specific effects of soil microbial filtrates prevail over those of arbuscular mycorrhizae in a fragmented landscape

Camila Pizano, Scott A. Mangan, James H. Graham & Kaoru Kitajima
Plant-soil interactions have been shown to determine plant community composition in a wide range of environments. However, how plants distinctly interact with beneficial and detrimental organisms across mosaic landscapes containing fragmented habitats is still poorly understood. We experimentally tested feedback responses between plants and soil microbial communities from adjacent habitats across a disturbance gradient within a human-modified tropical montane landscape. In a greenhouse experiment, two components of soil microbial communities were amplified; arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi...

Data from: The Automated Root Exudate System (ARES): a method to apply solutes at regular intervals to soils in the field

Luis Lopez-Sangil, Charles T. George, Eduardo Medina-Barcenas, Ali J. Birkett, Catherine Baxendale, Laetitia M. Bréchet, Eduard Estradera-Gumbau, Emma J. Sayer & Charles George
1) Root exudation is a key component of nutrient and carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems. Exudation rates vary widely by plant species and environmental conditions but our understanding of how root exudates affect soil functioning is incomplete, in part because there are few viable methods to manipulate root exudates in situ. To address this, we devised the Automated Root Exudate System (ARES), which simulates increased root exudation by applying small amounts of labile solutes at...

Data from: Photosynthetic acclimation to warming in tropical forest tree seedlings

Martijn Slot & Klaus Winter
Tropical forests have a mitigating effect on man-made climate change by acting as a carbon sink. For that effect to continue, tropical trees will have to acclimate to rising temperatures, but it is currently unknown whether they have this capacity. We grew seedlings of three tropical tree species over a range of temperature regimes (TGrowth = 25, 30, 35 °C) and measured the temperature response of photosynthetic CO2 uptake. All species showed signs of acclimation:...

Data from: Distance-dependent seedling mortality and long-term spacing dynamics in a neotropical forest community

Stephen J. Murphy, Thorsten Wiegand & Liza S. Comita
Negative distance dependence (NDisD), or reduced recruitment near adult conspecifics, is thought to explain the astounding diversity of tropical forests. While many studies show greater mortality at near vs. far distances from adults, these studies do not seek to track changes in the peak seedling curve over time, thus limiting our ability to link NDisD to coexistence. Using census data collected over 12 years from central Panama in conjunction with spatial mark-connection functions, we show...

Data from: Leaf trait variations associated with habitat affinity of tropical karst tree species

Nalaka Geekiyanage, Uromi Goodale, Kunfang Cao, Kaoru Kitajima & Uromi Manage Goodale
1. Karst hills, i.e., jagged topography created by dissolution of limestone and other soluble rocks, are distributed extensively in tropical forest regions, including southern parts of China. They are characterized by a sharp mosaic of water and nutrient availability, from exposed hilltops with poor soil development to valleys with occasional flooding, to which trees show species specific distributions. Here we report the relationship of leaf functional traits to habitat preference of tropical karst trees. 2....

Data from: Anchored hybrid enrichment provides new insights into the phylogeny and evolution of longhorned beetles (Cerambycidae)

Stephanie Haddad, Seunggwan Shin, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Petr Svacha, Brian Farrell, Adam Ślipiński, Donald Windsor & Duane D. McKenna
Cerambycidae is a species-rich family of mostly wood-feeding (xylophagous) beetles containing nearly 35 000 known species. The higher-level phylogeny of Cerambycidae has never been robustly reconstructed using molecular phylogenetic data or a comprehensive sample of higher taxa, and its internal relationships and evolutionary history remain the subjects of ongoing debate. We reconstructed the higher-level phylogeny of Cerambycidae using phylogenomic data from 522 single copy nuclear genes, generated via anchored hybrid enrichment. Our taxon sample (31...

Data from: Heterospecific eavesdropping in ant-following birds of the Neotropics is a learned behaviour

Henry S. Pollock, Ari E. Martinez, J.P. Kelley, Janeene M. Touchton, Corey E. Tarwater & J. Patrick Kelley
Animals eavesdrop on other species to obtain information about their environments. Heterospecific eavesdropping can yield tangible fitness benefits by providing valuable information about food resources and predator presence. The ability to eavesdrop may therefore be under strong selection, although extensive research on alarm-calling in avian mixed-species flocks has found only limited evidence that close association with another species could select for innate signal recognition. Nevertheless, very little is known about the evolution of eavesdropping behaviour...

Data from: Plant water potential improves prediction of empirical stomatal models

William R. L. Anderegg, Stephen Pacala, John S. Sperry, Brendan Choat, Daniel J. Chmura, Thomas Kolb, Frederick Meinzer, Pilar Pita, Víctor Resco De Dios & Brett T. Wolfe
Climate change is expected to lead to increases in drought frequency and severity, with deleterious effects on many ecosystems. Stomatal responses to changing environmental conditions form the backbone of all ecosystem models, but are based on empirical relationships and are not well-tested during drought conditions. Here, we use a dataset of 34 woody plant species spanning global forest biomes to examine the effect of leaf water potential on stomatal conductance and test the predictive accuracy...

Data from: The importance of standardization for biodiversity comparisons: a case study using Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) and metabarcoding to measure cryptic diversity on Mo'orea coral reefs, French Polynesia

Emma Ransome, Jonathan B. Geller, Molly Timmers, Matthieu Leray, Angka Mahardini, Andrianus Sembiring, Allen G. Collins & Christopher P. Meyer
The advancement of metabarcoding techniques, declining costs of high-throughput sequencing and development of systematic sampling devices, such as autonomous reef monitoring structures (ARMS), have provided the means to gather a vast amount of diversity data from cryptic marine communities. However, such increased capability could also lead to analytical challenges if the methods used to examine these communities across local and global scales are not standardized. Here we compare and assess the underlying biases of four...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    45

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    45

Affiliations

  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    45
  • Kyoto University
    3
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    3
  • Lancaster University
    3
  • The Open University
    3
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    2
  • National Museum
    2
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • The Ohio State University
    2
  • University of Montreal
    2