36 Works

Data from: Variation in host plant usage and diet breadth predict sibling preference and performance in the neotropical tortoise beetle Chelymorpha alternans (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae)

Colin R. Morrison, Clement Aubert & Donald M. Windsor
Specialized interactions between insects and the plants that they consume are one of the most ubiquitous and consequential ecological associations on the plant. Decades of investigation suggest that a narrow diet favors an individual phytophagous insect’s performance relative to a dietary generalist. However, this body of research has tended to approach questions of diet breadth and host usage from the perspective of temperate plant – insect associations. Relationships between diet breadth, host usage and variation...

Data from: Inter-chromosomal coupling between vision and pigmentation genes during genomic divergence

Kosmas Hench, Marta Vargas, Marc P. Höppner, W. Owen McMillan & Oscar Puebla
Recombination between loci underlying mate choice and ecological traits is a major evolutionary force acting against speciation with gene flow. The evolution of linkage disequilibrium between such loci is therefore a fundamental step in the origin of species. Here, we show that this process can take place in the absence of physical linkage in hamlets—a group of closely related reef fishes from the wider Caribbean that differ essentially in colour pattern and are reproductively isolated...

Data from: A phylogenomic resolution of the sea urchin tree of life

Nicolás Mongiardino Koch, Simon E. Coppard, Harilaos A. Lessios, Derek E.G. Briggs, Rich Mooi & Greg W. Rouse
Background: Echinoidea is a clade of marine animals including sea urchins, heart urchins, sand dollars and sea biscuits. Found in benthic habitats across all latitudes, echinoids are key components of marine communities such as coral reefs and kelp forests. A little over 1,000 species inhabit the oceans today, a diversity that traces its roots back at least to the Permian. Although much effort has been devoted to elucidating the echinoid tree of life using a...

Data from: Male-male aggression is unlikely to stabilize a poison frog polymorphism

Yusan Yang, Matthew B. Dugas, Houston J. Sudekum, Sean N. Murphy & Corinne L. Richards-Zawacki
Phenotypic polymorphism is common in animals, and the maintenance of multiple phenotypes in a population requires forces that act against homogenizing drift and selection. Male-male competition can contribute to the stability of a polymorphism when males compete primarily with males of the same phenotype. In and around a contact zone between red and blue lineages of the poison frog Oophaga pumilio, we used simulated territorial intrusions to test the non-exclusive predictions that males would direct...

Data from: Biotic and abiotic plant-soil feedback depends on nitrogen-acquisition strategy and shifts during long-term ecosystem development

Guochen Kenny Png, Hans Lambers, Paul Kardol, Benjamin L. Turner, David A. Wardle & Etienne Laliberté
1. Feedback between plants and soil is an important driver of plant community structure, but it remains unclear whether plant-soil feedback (PSF): (i) reflects changes in biotic or abiotic properties, (ii) depends on environmental context in terms of soil nutrient availability, and (iii) varies among plant functional groups. Because soil nutrient availability strongly affects plant distribution and performance, soil chemical properties and plant nutrient-acquisition strategies might serve as important drivers of PSF. 2. We used...

Data from: Reproductive traits as predictors of assembly chronosequence patterns in epiphyllous bryophyte metacommunities

Adriel M. Sierra, José Julio Toledo, Noris Salazar Allen & Charles E. Zartman
1) Understanding the mechanisms underlying species assembly is a central focus of plant ecology and is crucial to revealing how plant communities are structured. However, the temporal limitations of most terrestrial plant communities preclude collection of species assembly data in a tractable time-frame. 2) The aim of this study is to investigate the importance of dispersal potential, as estimated by inter-specific variation in sexual and asexual expression, as a predictor of patch chronosequence assembly for...

Data from: Global signal of top-down control of terrestrial plant communities by herbivores

Shihong Jia, Xugao Wang, Zuoqiang Yuan, Fei Lin, Ji Ye, Zhanqing Hao & Matthew Scott Luskin
The theory of “top-down” ecological regulation predicts that herbivory suppresses plant abundance, biomass, and survival but increases diversity through the disproportionate consumption of dominant species, which inhibits competitive exclusion. To date, these outcomes have been clear in aquatic ecosystems but not on land. We explicate this discrepancy using a meta-analysis of experimental results from 123 native animal exclusions in natural terrestrial ecosystems (623 pairwise comparisons). Consistent with top-down predictions, we found that herbivores significantly reduced...

Data from: Filter-dispersal assembly of lowland Neotropical rainforests across the Andes

Jordan B. Bemmels, S. Joseph Wright, Nancy C. Garwood, Simon A. Queenborough, Renato Valencia & Christopher W. Dick
Numerous Neotropical rainforest species are distributed in both Amazonia and Central America, reflecting a rich history of biotic interchange between regions. However, some plant lineages are endemic to one region, due in part to the dispersal barrier posed by the northern Andean cordilleras and adjacent savannas. To investigate the role of biogeographic filtering across the northern Andes in regional community assembly, we examined environmental tolerances, functional traits, and biogeographic distributions of >1000 woody plant species...

Data from: Anuran predators overcome visual illusion: dazzle coloration does not protect moving prey

Sara Zlotnik, Geena M. Darnell & Ximena E. Bernal
Predators everywhere impose strong selection pressures on the morphology and behavior of their prey, but the resulting antipredator adaptations vary greatly among species. Studies of adaptive coloration in prey species have generally focused on cryptic or aposematic prey, with little consideration of color patterns in palatable mobile prey. Complex color patterns have been proposed to decrease the ability of visual predators to capture moving prey (motion dazzle effect). Most support for this hypothesis, however, comes...

Data from: 100-year time-series reveal little morphological change following impoundment and predator invasion in two Neotropical characids

Ilke Geladi, Luis Fernando De León, Mark Torchin, Andrew Hendry, Rigoberto Gonzalez & Diana Sharpe
Human activities are dramatically altering ecosystems worldwide, often resulting in shifts in selection regimes. In response, natural populations sometimes undergo rapid phenotypic changes, which if adaptive, can increase their probability of persistence. However, in many instances, populations fail to undergo any phenotypic change, which might indicate a variety of possibilities, including maladaptation. In freshwater ecosystems, the impoundment of rivers and the introduction of exotic species are among the leading threats to native fishes. We examined...

Data from: Decomposition of coarse woody debris in a long-term litter manipulation experiment: a focus on nutrient availability

Evan M. Gora, Emma J. Sayer, Benjamin L. Turner & Edmund V. J. Tanner
1.The majority of aboveground carbon in tropical forests is stored in wood, which is returned to the atmosphere during decomposition of coarse woody debris. However, the factors controlling wood decomposition have not been experimentally manipulated over time scales comparable to the length of this process. 2.We hypothesized that wood decomposition is limited by nutrient availability and tested this hypothesis in a long-term litter addition and removal experiment in a lowland tropical forest in Panama. Specifically,...

Data from: Assessing canalisation of intraspecific variation on a macroevolutionary scale: the case of crinoid arms through the Phanerozoic

Catalina Pimiento, Kit Lam Tang, Samuel Zamora, Christian Klug & Marcelo Ricardo Sánchez-Villagra
Pictures of Crinoid Specimens 1Pictures of species with names that start with the letters A-Ccrinoids_1.zipPictures of Crinoid Specimens 2Pictures of species with names that start with the letters D-Ocrinoids_2.zipPictures of Crinoid Specimens 3Pictures of species with names that start with the letter Pcrinoids_3.zipPictures of Crinoid Specimens 4Pictures of species with names that start with the letters S-Zcrinoids_4.zip

Data from: Influences of fire–vegetation feedbacks and post-fire recovery rates on forest landscape vulnerability to altered fire regimes

Alan J. Tepley, Enrique Thomann, Thomas T. Veblen, George L.W. Perry, Andrés Holz, Juan Paritsis, Thomas Kitzberger, Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira & George L. W. Perry
1. In the context of on-going climatic warming, forest landscapes face increasing risk of conversion to non-forest vegetation through alteration of their fire regimes and their post-fire recovery dynamics. However, this pressure could be amplified or dampened, depending on how fire-driven changes to vegetation feed back to alter the extent or behavior of subsequent fires. 2. Here we develop a mathematical model to formalize understanding of how fire–vegetation feedbacks and the time to forest recovery...

Data from: Edaphic factors, successional status, and functional traits drive habitat associations of trees in naturally regenerating tropical dry forests

Leland K. Werden, Justin M. Becknell & Jennifer S. Powers
1. Many studies have examined individual environmental drivers of tropical tree species distributions, but edaphic and successional gradients have not been considered simultaneously. Furthermore, determining how functional traits influence species distributions along these gradients may help to elucidate mechanisms behind community assembly. 2. To assess the influence of environmental filtering on tropical dry forest (TDF) tree species distributions we used forest inventory data from sites with large edaphic and successional gradients in NW Costa Rica....

Data from: Litter removal in a tropical rain forest reduces fine root biomass and production but litter addition has few effects

Chadtip Rodtassana, Edmund V.J. Tanner & E. V. J. Tanner
Many old-growth lowland tropical rain forests are potentially nutrient limited, and it has long been thought that many such forests maintain growth by recycling nutrients from decomposing litter. We investigated this by continuously removing (for ten years) freshly fallen litter from five (45 m x 45 m) plots, adding it to five other plots, there were five controls. From monthly measures over one year we show that litter removal caused lower: fine root (≤2 mm...

Data from: Adaptive changes in sexual signaling in response to urbanization

Wouter Halfwerk, Michiel Blaas, Lars Kramer, Nadia Hijner, Paula A. Trillo, Ximena E. Bernal, Rachel A. Page, Sandra Goutte, Michael J. Ryan & Jacintha Ellers
Urbanization can cause species to adjust their sexual displays, as the effectiveness of mating signals is impacted by environmental conditions. Despite many examples showing that mating signals in urban conditions differ from those in rural conditions, we do not know whether these differences provide a combined reproductive and survival benefit to the urban phenotype. Here we show that male túngara frogs have increased the conspicuousness of their calls, which is under strong sexual and natural...

Data from: How do lianas and vines influence competitive differences and niche differences among tree species? Concepts and a case study in a tropical forest

Helene C. Muller-Landau & Marco D. Visser
1. Lianas and other climbing plants are structural parasites of trees, generally reducing host tree survival, growth, and reproduction, yet their influences on the outcome of competition among tree species have remained largely unexplored. 2. We propose that there are three distinct components to liana-tree interactions: prevalence, defined as the proportion of infested trees; load, defined as the mean liana cover on infested trees; and tolerance, defined as the effect of a given level of...

Data from: Molecular signatures of host specificity linked to habitat specialization in Exaiptasia sea anemones.

Emily S. Bellis, Reid B. Edlund, Hazel K. Berrios, Harilaos A. Lessios, Dee R. Denver & Reid. B. Edlund
Rising ocean temperatures associated with global climate change induce breakdown of the symbiosis between coelenterates and photosynthetic microalgae of the genus Symbiodinium. Association with more thermotolerant partners could contribute to resilience, but the genetic mechanisms controlling specificity of hosts for particular Symbiodinium types are poorly known. Here we characterize wild populations of a sea anemone laboratory model system for anthozoan symbiosis, from contrasting environments in Caribbean Panama. Patterns of anemone abundance and symbiont diversity were...

Data from: Soil nutrients and dispersal limitation shape compositional variation in secondary tropical forests across multiple scales

Michiel Van Breugel, Dylan Craven, Hao Ran Lai, Mario Bailon, Benjamin L. Turner, Jefferson S. Hall & Mario Baillon
1. Soil resource partitioning and dispersal limitation have been shown to shape the tree community structure of mature tropical forests, but are poorly studied in the context of forest succession. We examined the relative contributions of both ecological processes to the variation in the species composition of young tropical secondary forests at different spatial scales, and if the relative importance of these two ecological processes changed during succession. At the species level, we examined if...

Data from: Evolutionary relationships, cospeciation, and host switching in avian malaria parasites

Robert E. Ricklefs, Sylvia M. Fallon & Eldredge Bermingham
We used phylogenetic analyses of cytochrome b sequences of malaria parasites and their avian hosts to assess the coevolutionary relationships between host and parasite lineages. Many lineages of avian malaria parasites have broad host distributions, which tend to obscure cospeciation events. The hosts of a single parasite or of closely related parasites were nonetheless most frequently recovered from members of the same host taxonomic family, more so than expected by chance. However, global assessments of...

Data from: The insect-focused classification of fruit syndromes in tropical rainforests: an inter-continental comparison

Chris Dahl, Richard Ctvrtecka, Sofia Gripenberg, Owen T. Lewis, Simon T. Segar, Petr Klimes, Katerina Sam, Dominic Rinan, Jonah Filip, Roll Lilip, Pitoon Kongnoo, Montarika Panmeng, Sutipun Putnaul, Manat Reungaew, Marleny Rivera, Hector Barrios, Stuart J. Davies, Sarayudh Bunyavejchewin, Joseph S. Wright, George D. Weiblen, Vojtech Novotny & Yves Basset.
We propose a new classification of rainforest plants into eight fruit syndromes, based on fruit morphology and other traits relevant to fruit-feeding insects. This classification is compared with other systems based on plant morphology or traits relevant to vertebrate fruit dispersers. Our syndromes are based on fruits sampled from 1,192 plant species at three Forest Global Earth Observatory plots: Barro Colorado Island (Panama), Khao Chong (Thailand) and Wanang (Papua New Guinea). The three plots differed...

Data from: Differential introgression of a female competitive trait in a hybrid zone between sex-role reversed species

Sara E. Lipshutz, Joana I. Meier, Matthew J. Miller, Graham Derryberry, Ole Seehausen & Elizabeth Perrault Derryberry
Mating behavior between recently diverged species in secondary contact can impede or promote reproductive isolation. Traditionally, researchers focus on the importance of female mate choice and male-male competition in maintaining or eroding species barriers. Although female-female competition is widespread, little is known about its role in the speciation process. Here, we investigate a case of interspecific female competition and its influence on patterns of phenotypic and genetic introgression between species. We examine a hybrid zone...

Tree species abundance through time in tropical forest census plots, Panama

Richard Condit, Rolando Pérez, Salomón Aguilar, Suzanne Lao, Foster Robin & Stephen Hubbell
All trees at least 1 cm diameter at breast height were censused in three sites in Panama. The Barro Colorado plot is 50 hectares in area and was fully censused on eight occasions between 1982 and 2015. The Sherman plot is 5.96 hectares and was fully censuses four times between 1996 and 2009. The Cocoli plot is 4 hectares and was censused three times between 1994 and 1999. The three accompanying tables give the population...

Data from: Interspecific variation in conspecific negative density dependence can make species less likely to coexist

Simon Maccracken Stump & Liza S. Comita
Conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD) is thought to promote plant species diversity. Theoretical studies showing the importance of CNDD often assumed that all species are equally susceptible to CNDD; however, recent empirical studies have shown species can differ greatly in their susceptibility to CNDD. Using a theoretical model, we show that interspecific variation in CNDD can dramatically alter its impact on diversity. First, if the most common species are the least regulated by CNDD, then...

Data from: Host associated bacterial community succession during amphibian development

Tiffany L. Prest, Abigail K. Kimball, Jordan G. Kueneman & Valerie J. Mckenzie
Amphibians undergo significant developmental changes during their life cycle, as they typically move from a primarily aquatic environment to a more terrestrial one. Amphibian skin is a mucosal tissue that assembles communities of symbiotic microbiota. However, it is currently not well understood as to where amphibians acquire their skin symbionts, and whether the sources of microbial symbionts change throughout development. In this study, we utilized data collected from four wild boreal toad populations (Anaxyrus boreas);...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    36

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    36

Affiliations

  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    36
  • University of Minnesota
    4
  • Princeton University
    3
  • Yale University
    3
  • Colby College
    2
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • Oregon State University
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • New Guinea Binatang Research Center
    2
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    2