6 Works

Data from: Surviving in mountain climate refugia: new insights from the genetic diversity and structure of the relict shrub Myrtus nivellei (Myrtaceae) in the Sahara desert

Jérémy Migliore, Alex Baumel, Marianick Juin, Bruno Fady, Anne Roig, Nathalie Duong & Frédéric Médail
The identification of past glacial refugia has become a key topic for conservation under environmental change, since they contribute importantly to shaping current patterns of biodiversity. However, little attention has been paid so far to interglacial refugia despite their key role for the survival of relict species currently occurring in climate refugia. Here, we focus on the genetic consequences of range contraction on the relict populations of the evergreen shrub Myrtus nivellei, endemic in the...

Data from: The more the better – polyandry and genetic similarity are positively linked to reproductive success in a natural population of terrestrial salamanders (Salamandra salamandra)

Barbara A. Caspers, E. Tobias Krause, Ralf Hendrix, Michael Kopp, Oliver Rupp, Katrin Rosentreter & Sebastian Steinfartz
Although classically thought to be rare, female polyandry is wide-spread and may entail significant fitness benefits. If females store sperm over extended periods of time, the consequences of polyandry will depend on the pattern of sperm storage, and some of the potential benefits of polyandry can only be realized if sperm from different males is mixed. Our study aimed to determine patterns and consequences of polyandry in an amphibian species, the fire salamander, under fully...

Data from: Family based guilds in the ant Pachycondyla inversa

Heikki Helanterä, Oliver Aehle, Maurice Roux, Jürgen Heinze & Patrizia D'Ettorre
High relatedness promotes the evolution of sociality because potentially costly cooperative behaviours are directed towards kin. However, societies, such as those of social insects, also benefit from genetic diversity, e.g. through enhanced disease resistance and division of labour. Effects of genetic diversity have been investigated in a few complex eusocial species. Here, we show that genetically based division of labour may also be important in ‘simple societies’, with fewer individuals and limited morphological caste differentiation....

Data from: Effects of diet on resource utilization by a model human gut microbiota containing Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, a symbiont with an extensive glycobiome

Nathan P. McNulty, Wu Meng, Alison R. Erickson, Chongle Pan, Brian K. Erickson, Eric C. Martens, Nicholas A. Pudlo, Brian D. Muegge, Bernard Henrissat, Robert L. Hettich, Jeffrey I. Gordon & Meng Wu
The human gut microbiota is an important metabolic organ. However, little is known about how its individual species interact, establish dominant positions, and respond to changes in environmental factors such as diet. In the current study, gnotobiotic mice colonized with a simplified model microbiota composed of 12 sequenced human gut bacterial species were fed oscillating diets of disparate composition. Rapid, reproducible and reversible changes in community structure were observed. Time series microbial RNA-Seq analyses revealed...

Data from: The evolution of canaliculate rudists in the light of a new canaliculate polyconitid rudist from the Albian of the Central Pacific

Shin-Ichi Sano, Yasuhiro Iba, Peter W. Skelton, Jean-Pierre Masse, Yolanda M. Aguilar & Tomoki Kase
A new polyconitid rudist, Magallanesia canaliculata gen. et sp. nov., of probably late Albian age, is described from the Pulangbato area, central Cebu Island, the Philippines in the western Central Pacific and Takuyo Daini Seamount, now located in the Northwest Pacific. It is similar to Praecaprotina Yabe and Nagao, 1926, a Japanese – Central Pacific endemic genus of late Aptian – early Albian age, but differs in having canals that developed by partitioning of the...

Data from: Fe-S cluster biosynthesis controls uptake of aminoglycosides in a ROS-less death pathway

Benjamin Ezraty, Alexandra Vergnes, Manuel Banzhaf, Yohann Duverger, Allison Huguenot, Ana Rita Brochado, Shu-Yi Su, Leon Espinosa, Laurent Loiseau, Béatrice Py, Athanasios Typas & Frédéric Barras
All bactericidal antibiotics were recently proposed to kill by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, causing destabilization of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters and generating Fenton chemistry. We find that the ROS response is dispensable upon treatment with bactericidal antibiotics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Fe-S clusters are required for killing only by aminoglycosides. In contrast to cells, using the major Fe-S cluster biosynthesis machinery, ISC, cells using the alternative machinery, SUF, cannot efficiently mature respiratory complexes I...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Aix-Marseille University
    6
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • National Museum
    1
  • Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum
    1
  • University of Regensburg
    1
  • Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    1
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    1
  • University of Michigan Medical School
    1
  • Hokkaido University
    1
  • Ecologie des Forêts Méditerranéennes
    1