3 Works

Data from: Mycelia-derived C contributes more to nitrogen cycling than root-derived C in ectomycorrhizal alpine forests

Ziliang Zhang, Richard P. Phillips, Wenqiang Zhao, Yuanshuang Yuan, Qing Liu & Huajun Yin
1. Plant roots and their associated microbial symbionts impact carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in ecosystems, but estimates of the relative contributions of root- versus microbe-derived dynamic inputs are highly uncertain. Roots release C into soil via exudation and turnover (i.e., root-derived C), but also by allocating C to mycorrhizal fungal mycelia, which exude C and undergo turnover (i.e., mycelia-derived C). Given that the relative contributions of root- and mycelia-derived C inputs are unknown, a...

Data from: Legume abundance along successional and rainfall gradients in neotropical forests

Maga Gei, Danaë M. A. Rozendaal, Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, Janet I. Sprent, Mira D. Garner, T. Mitchell Aide, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Pedro H.S. Brancalion, George A. L. Cabral, Ricardo Gomes César, Robin L. Chazdon, Rebecca J. Cole, Gabriel Dalla Colletta, Ben De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan Manuel Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mário Marcos Do Espírito Santo, G. Wilson Fernandes, Yule Roberta Ferreira Nunes … & Jennifer S. Powers
The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen (N)-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of forest-inventory plots from a network of 42 Neotropical forest chronosequences. During the first three decades of natural forest regeneration, legume basal area...

Data from: Biomechanical factors influencing successful self-righting in the pleurodire turtle, Emydura subglobosa

Alexander M Rubin, Richard W Blob & Christopher J Mayerl
Self-righting performance is a key ability for most terrestrial animals, and has been used as a metric of fitness, exhaustion, and thermal limits in a variety of taxa. However, there is little understanding of the underlying mechanisms that drive variation in self-righting performance. To evaluate the mechanical factors that contribute to success versus failure when animals attempt to self-right, we compared force production and kinematic behavior in the rigid-bodied, pleurodire turtle Emydura subglobosa between successful...

Registration Year

  • 2018
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Clemson University
    3
  • Federal University of Southern Bahia
    1
  • Colby College
    1
  • Columbia University
    1
  • College of the Atlantic
    1
  • Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
    1
  • University of Alberta
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • Aarhus University
    1