20 Works

Data from: Spatial and temporal variation in nest temperatures forecasts sex ratio skews in a crocodilian with environmental sex determination

Samantha L. Bock, Russell H. Lowers, Thomas R. Rainwater, Eric Stolen, John M. Drake, Philip M. Wilkinson, Stephanie Weiss, Back Brenton, Louis Guillette & Benjamin B. Parrott
Species displaying temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) are especially vulnerable to the effects of a rapidly changing global climate due to their profound sensitivity to thermal cues during development. Predicting the consequences of climate change for these species, including skewed offspring sex ratios, depends on understanding how climatic factors interface with features of maternal nesting behavior to shape the developmental environment. Here, we measure thermal profiles in 86 nests at two geographically distinct sites in the...

Identification and characterization of QTLs for fruit quality traits in peach through a multi-family approach

Zena Rawandoozi, Timothy P. Hartmann, Silvia Carpenedo, Ksenija Gasic, Cassia Da Silva Linge, Lichun Cai, Eric Van De Weg & David H. Byrne
Background Fruit quality traits have a significant effect on consumer acceptance and subsequently on peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) consumption. Determining the genetic bases of key fruit quality traits is essential for the industry to improve fruit quality and increase consumption. Pedigree-based analysis across multiple peach pedigrees can identify the genomic basis of complex traits for direct implementation in marker-assisted selection. This strategy provides breeders with better-informed decisions and improves selection efficiency and, subsequently, saves...

Westward range expansion from middle latitudes explains the Mississippi River discontinuity in a forest herb of eastern North America

Carly Prior, Nate Layman, Matthew Koski, Laura Galloway & Jeremiah Busch
It is often expected that temperate plants have expanded their geographic ranges northward from primarily southern refugia. Evidence for this hypothesis is mixed in eastern North American species, and there is increasing support for colonization from middle latitudes. We studied genome-wide patterns of variation in RADseq loci to test hypotheses concerning range expansion in a North American forest herb (Campanula americana). First, spatial patterns of genetic differentiation were determined. Then phylogenetic relationships and divergence times...

Urban specialization reduces habitat connectivity by a highly mobile wading bird

Claire Teitelbaum, Hepinstall-Cymerman Jeffrey, Kidd-Weaver Anjelika, Hernandez Sonia, Altizer Sonia & Hall Richard
Background Mobile animals transport nutrients and propagules across habitats, and are crucial for the functioning of food webs and for ecosystem services. Human activities such as urbanization can alter animal movement behavior, including site fidelity and resource use. Because many urban areas are adjacent to natural sites, mobile animals might connect natural and urban habitats. More generally, understanding animal movement patterns in urban areas can help predict how urban expansion will affect the roles of...

Disentangling interactions among mercury, immunity, and infection in a Neotropical bat community

Daniel Becker, Kelly Speer, Jennifer Korstian, Dmitriy Volokhov, Hannah Droke, Alexis Brown, Catherene Baijnauth, Ticha Padgett-Stewart, Hugh Broders, Raina Plowright, Thomas Rainwater, Brock Fenton, Nancy Simmons & Matthew Chumchal
Contaminants such as mercury are pervasive and can have immunosuppressive effects on wildlife. Impaired immunity could be important for forecasting pathogen spillover risks, as many land-use changes that generate mercury contamination also bring wildlife into close contact with humans and domestic animals. However, the interactions among contaminants, immunity, and infection are difficult to study in natural systems, and empirical tests of possible directional relationships remain rare. We capitalized on extreme mercury variation in a diverse...

Data from: Body shape diversification along the benthic-pelagic axis in marine fishes

Sarah Friedman, Samantha Price, Katherine Corn, Olivier Larouche, Christopher Martinez & Peter Wainwright
Colonization of novel habitats can result in marked phenotypic responses to the new environment that include changes in body shape and opportunities for further morphological diversification. Fishes have repeatedly transitioned along the benthic-pelagic axis, with varying degrees of association with the substrate. Previous work focusing on individual lineages shows that these transitions are accompanied by highly predictable changes in body form. Here, we generalize expectations drawn from this literature to study the effects of habitat...

Detoxification-related gene expression accompanies anhydrobiosis in the foliar nematode (Aphelenchoides fragariae)

Zhen Fu, Paula Agudelo & Christina Wells
The foliar nematode (Aphelenchoides fragariae) is a quarantined pest that infects a broad range of herbaceous and woody plants. Previous work has demonstrated its remarkable ability to survive rapid and extreme desiccation, although the specific mechanisms underlying its anhydrobiotic response have not been characterized. We used RNA sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly to compare patterns of gene expression between hydrated and 24-hr desiccated nematodes. Two thousand eighty-three and 953 genes were significantly up- and...

QTL mapping and marker development for tolerance to sulfur phytotoxicity in melon (Cucumis Melo)

Sandra Branham, James Daley, Amnon Levi, Richard Hassell & Patrick Wechter
Elemental sulfur is an effective, inexpensive fungicide for many foliar pathogens, but severe phytotoxicity prohibits its use on many melon varieties. Sulfur phytotoxicity causes chlorosis and necrosis of leaf tissue, leading to plant death in the most sensitive lines, while other varieties have little to no damage. A high-density, genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)-based genetic map of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population segregating for sulfur tolerance was used for a quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping study of...

A multi-species approach to manage effects of land cover and weather on upland game birds

Alexander Schindler, David Haukos, Christian Hagen & Beth Ross
Loss and degradation of grasslands in the Great Plains region has resulted in major declines in abundance of grassland bird species. To ensure future viability of grassland bird populations, it is crucial to evaluate specific effects of environmental factors among species to determine drivers of population decline and develop effective conservation strategies. We used threshold models to quantify effects of land cover and weather changes on lesser and greater prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus and T. cupido,...

Effect of soil carbon amendments in reversing the legacy effect of plant invasion

Vidya Suseela, Ziliang Zhang & Prasanta Bhowmik
1. Invasive plant species are key drivers of global environmental changes leading to the disruption of ecosystems they invade. Many invasive species engage in novel niche construction through plant-soil feedbacks facilitated by the input of secondary compounds, which help their further spread and survival. These compounds can persist in soil even after the removal of the invader thus creating a legacy effect that inhibits the return of native flora and fauna. Thus, formulating active intervention...

Student Affairs Practitioners’ Perceptions of the Career Development of Sorority Members

Kristin M. Walker & Pamela A. Havice

A Document Analysis of Anti-Hazing Policy

Christobal Salinas, Michelle Boettcher & Jennifer Plagman-Galvin

Climate-related geographic variation in performance traits across the invasion front of a widespread nonnative insect

Lily Thompson, Sean Powers, Ashley Appolon, Petra Hafker, Lelia Milner, Dylan Parry, Salvatore Agosta & Kristine Grayson
Aim: Invasive species are an ideal system for testing geographic differences in performance traits and measuring evolutionary responses as a species spreads across divergent climates and habitats. The European gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar dispar L. (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), is a generalist forest defoliator introduced to Medford, Massachusetts, USA in 1869. Currently, the invasion front extends from Minnesota to North Carolina and the ability of gypsy moth populations to adapt to local climate may contribute to its...

Influences of patch-burn grazing on headwater prairie streams and subsequent recovery

Jessica Fulgoni, Matt Whiles, Walter Dodds, Danelle Larson, Karen Jackson & Bartosz Grudzinski
1. Patch-burn grazing (PBG) can promote terrestrial heterogeneity and biodiversity, but can temporarily increase stream nutrients, ecosystem metabolism, and alter macroinvertebrate assemblages. The impacts of grazing on stream channel morphology and post-PBG recovery patterns are unclear. 2. We assessed the influence of grazing in PBG managed grassland streams in Missouri, USA, and subsequent recovery when grazing ceased for two years. We hypothesized that grazing would degrade water quality, stream biotic integrity, and channel morphology, but...

Pollen color morphs take different paths to fitness

Matthew Koski, Andrea Berardi & Laura Galloway
Color phenotypes are often involved in communication and are thus under selection by species interactions. However, selection may also act on color through correlated traits or alternative functions of biochemical pigments. Such forms of selection are instrumental in maintaining petal color diversity in plants. Pollen color also varies markedly, but the maintenance of this variation is little understood. In Campanula americana, pollen ranges from white to dark purple, with darker morphs garnering more pollinator visits...

Empirical evidence of different egg morphs that match host eggs in the brush cuckoo (Cacomantis variolosus)

Virginia Abernathy & Wei Liang
One of the most efficient defences against obligate brood parasitism in birds is egg ejection, where a host recognises and removes the parasitic egg from the nest. This defence often selects for egg mimicry in parasitic species to reduce the likelihood of egg ejection. If a parasite uses multiple host species with distinctive egg types, this could lead to the evolution of egg gentes (host-specific egg types) in the parasite. There is observational evidence that...

The complex history of genome duplication and hybridization in North American gray treefrogs

William W. Booker, H. Carl Gerhardt, Alan R. Lemmon, Margaret Ptacek, Alyssa T. B. Hassinger, Johannes Schul & Emily M. Lemmon
Polyploid speciation has played an important role in evolutionary history across the tree of life, yet there remain large gaps in our understanding of how polyploid species form and persist. While systematic studies have been conducted in numerous polyploid complexes, recent advances in sequencing technology have demonstrated that conclusions from data-limited studies may be spurious and misleading. The North American gray treefrog complex, consisting of the diploid Hyla chrysoscelis and the tetraploid Hyla versicolor, has...

Data from: Differential impacts of nitrogen addition on rhizosphere and bulk-soil carbon sequestration in an alpine shrubland

Xiaomin Zhu, Ziliang Zhang, Dongyan Liu, Yongping Kou, Qian Zheng, Mei Liu, Juan Xiao, Qing Liu & Huajun Yin
1. Due to complex root-soil interactions, the responses of carbon (C) dynamics in the rhizosphere to elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may be different from those in bulk soil. However, the potentially different response of C dynamics in the rhizosphere and bulk soils and their contributions to soil C sequestration under N deposition is still not elucidated. 2. We conducted an N addition experiment in an alpine shrubland dominated by Sibiraea angustata located on the eastern...

The promise and the perils of resurveying to understand global change impacts

Katharine Stuble, Sharon Bewick, Mark Fisher, Matthew Forister, Susan Harrison, Arthur Shapiro, Andrew Latimer & Laurel Fox
Historical datasets can be useful tools to aid in understanding the impacts of global change on natural ecosystems. Resampling of historically sampled sites (“snapshot resampling”) has often been used to detect long-term shifts in ecological populations and communities, because it allows researchers to avoid long-term monitoring costs and investigate a large number of potential trends. But recent simulation-based research has called the reliability of resampling into question, and its utility has not been comprehensively evaluated....

Data associated with \"Floral pigmentation has responded rapidly to global change in ozone and temperature\"

Matthew Koski, Drew MacQueen & Tia-Lynn Ashman
Across kingdoms, organisms ameliorate UV stress by increasing UV-absorbing pigmentation. Rapid ozone degradation during the 20th century resulted in elevated UV incidence, yet pigmentation responses to this aspect of global change have yet to be demonstrated. In flowering plants, UV exposure favors larger areas of UV-absorbing pigmentation on petals, which protects pollen from UV-damage. Pigmentation also affects floral thermoregulation, suggesting climate warming may additionally impact pigmentation. We used 1238 herbarium specimens collected from 1941 to...

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  • Clemson University
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