814 Works

Data from: Do small swarms have an advantage when house hunting? The effect of swarm size on nest-site selection by Apis mellifera

Timothy M. Schaerf, James C. Makinson, Mary R. Myerscough & Madeleine Beekman
Reproductive swarms of honeybees are faced with the problem of finding a good site to establish a new colony. We examined the potential effects of swarm size on the quality of nest-site choice through a combination of modelling and field experiments. We used an individual-based model to examine the effects of swarm size on decision accuracy under the assumption that the number of bees actively involved in the decision-making process (scouts) is an increasing function...

Data from: Divergent evolutionary processes associated with colonization of offshore islands

Natália Martínková, Ross Barnett, Thomas Cucchi, Rahel Struchen, Marine Pascal, Michel Pascal, Martin C. Fischer, Thomas Higham, Selina Brace, Simon Y. W. Ho, Jean-Pierre Quéré, Paul O'Higgins, Laurent Excoffier, Gerald Heckel, A. Rus Hoelzel, Keith M. Dobney & Jeremy B. Searle
Oceanic islands have been a test ground for evolutionary theory, but here, we focus on the possibilities for evolutionary study created by offshore islands. These can be colonized through various means and by a wide range of species, including those with low dispersal capabilities. We use morphology, modern and ancient sequences of cytochrome b (cytb) and microsatellite genotypes to examine colonization history and evolutionary change associated with occupation of the Orkney archipelago by the common...

Data from: Maternity of emergency queens in the cape honey bee, Apis mellifera capensis

Madeleine Beekman, Ben Oldroyd, Michael Allsopp, Theresa Wossler & Michael Holmes
During reproductive swarming, some workers of the Cape honey bee, Apis mellifera capensis, lay eggs in queen cells, many of which are reared to maturity. However, it is unknown if workers are able to lay in queen cells immediately after queen loss during an episode of emergency queen rearing. In this study we experimentally de-queened colonies and determined the maternity of larvae and pupae that were reared as queens. This allowed us to determine how...

Data from: Directional dispersal has not evolved during the cane toad invasion

Gregory P. Brown, Benjamin L. Phillips & Richard Shine
1. The ability to disperse along a consistent compass heading strongly affects the rate and efficiency of an animal's displacement, and thus is under selection at the expanding edge of a biological invasion. 2. We used radiotelemetry to assess whether the dispersal direction of cane toads (Rhinella marina) changed as a function of time since invasion, by comparing (i) toads at a single site monitored annually for 10 years subsequent to toad arrival; (ii) toads...

Data from: Listening to the environment: hearing differences from an epigenetic effect in solitarious and gregarious locusts

Shira D. Gordon, Joseph C. Jackson, Stephen M. Rogers & James F. C. Windmill
Locusts display a striking form of phenotypic plasticity, developing into either a lone-living solitarious phase or a swarming gregarious phase depending on population density. The two phases differ extensively in appearance, behaviour and physiology. We found that solitarious and gregarious locusts have clear differences in their hearing, both in their tympanal and neuronal responses. We identified significant differences in the shape of the tympana that may be responsible for the variations in hearing between locust...

Data from: Chemical suppression of embryonic cane toads Rhinella marina by larval conspecifics

Gregory S. Clarke, Michael R. Crossland, Cathy Shilton & Richard Shine
1. Mechanisms that evolved to suppress the development of potential competitors may offer novel methods for species-specific control of invasive organisms. The tadpoles of cane toads Rhinella marina compete for limited food resources in small ponds, and older tadpoles eliminate competitors not only by eating newly-laid eggs, but also by releasing a chemical that suppresses development of conspecific eggs. 2. We conducted laboratory trials to assess the magnitude and generality of this suppression effect, and...

Data from: Woodstoich III: integrating tools of nutritional geometry and ecological stoichiometry to advance nutrient budgeting and the prediction of consumer-driven nutrient recycling

Erik Sperfeld, Halvor M. Halvorson, Matthew Malishev, Fiona J. Clissold & Nicole D. Wagner
Within the last two decades, ecological stoichiometry (ES) and nutritional geometry (NG, also known as geometric framework for nutrition) have delivered novel insights into core questions of nutritional ecology. These two nutritionally explicit frameworks differ in the ‘nutrient currency’ used and the focus of their past research; behavioural feeding strategies in NG, mainly investigating terrestrial organisms, and trophic ecology in ES, mainly in aquatic settings. However, both NG and ES have developed in explaining patterns...

Data from: Phantom alternatives influence food preferences in the eastern honey bee Apis cerana

Ken Tan, Shihao Dong, Xiwen Liu, Weiweng Chen, Yuchong Wang, Benjamin P. Oldroyd & Tanya Latty
1. Most models of animal choice behaviour assume that desirable but unavailable options, such as a high quality, but inhabited nest site, do not influence an individual’s preferences for the remaining options. However, experiments suggest that in mammals such ‘phantom’ alternatives can alter, and even reverse, an individual’s preferences for other items in a choice set. 2. Here we investigate the effect of phantom alternatives on feeder preferences in the eastern honey bee, Apis cerana....

Data from: Prioritizing management actions for invasive populations using cost, efficacy, demography, and expert opinion for 14 plant species worldwide

Natalie Z. Kerr, Peter W. J. Baxter, Roberto Salguero-Gomez, Glenda M. Wardle, Yvonne M. Buckley & Peter W.J. Baxter
Management of invasive populations is typically investigated case-by-case. Comparative approaches have been applied to single aspects of management, such as demography, with cost or efficacy rarely incorporated. We present an analysis of the ranks of management actions for 14 species in five countries that extends beyond the use of demography alone to include multiple metrics for ranking management actions, which integrate cost, efficacy and demography (cost-effectiveness) and managers’ expert opinion of ranks. We use content...

Data from: Simulating regimes of chemical disturbance and testing impacts in the ecosystem using a novel programmable dosing system

Mark Anthony Browne, Paul R. Brooks, Robert Clough, Andrew S. Fisher, Mariana Mayer Pinto & Tasman P. Crowe
Pollution is a global issue at the frontier between ecology, environmental science, management, engineering and policy. Legislation requires experiments to determine how much contamination an ecosystem can absorb before there are structural or functional changes. Yet, existing methods cannot realistically simulate regimes of chemical disturbance and determine impacts to assemblages in ecosystems. This is because they lack ecologically relevant species and biotic interactions, are logistically difficult to set-up, and lack environmentally relevant regimes of chemical...

Data from: Crimson spotted rainbowfish (Melanotaenia duboulayi) change their spatial position according to nutritional requirement

Matthew J. Hansen, Timothy M. Schaerf, Jens Krause & Ashley J. W. Ward
Decision making in moving animal groups has been shown to be disproportionately influenced by individuals at the front of groups. Therefore, an explanation of state-dependent positioning of individuals within animal groups may provide a mechanism for group movement decisions. Nutritional state is dynamic and can differ between members of the same group. It is also known to drive animal movement decisions. Therefore, we assayed 6 groups of 8 rainbowfish foraging in a flow tank. Half...

Data from: Ancient mitochondrial DNA provides high-resolution time scale of the peopling of the Americas

Bastien Llamas, Lars Fehren-Schmitz, Guido Valverde, Julien Soubrier, Swapan Mallick, Nadin Rohland, Susanne Nordenfelt, Cristina Valdiosera, Stephen M. Richards, Adam Rohrlach, Maria Inés Barreto Romero, Isabel Flores Espinoza, Elsa Tomasto Cagigao, Lucía Watson Jiménez, Krzysztof Makowski, Ilán Santiago Leboreiro Reyna, Josefina Mansilla Lory, Julio Alejandro Ballivián Torrez, Mario A. Rivera, Richard L. Burger, Maria Constanza Ceruti, Johan Reinhard, R. Spencer Wells, Gustavo Politis, Calogero M. Santoro … & Wolfgang Haak
The exact timing, route, and process of the initial peopling of the Americas remains uncertain despite much research. Archaeological evidence indicates the presence of humans as far as southern Chile by 14.6 thousand years ago (ka), shortly after the Pleistocene ice sheets blocking access from eastern Beringia began to retreat. Genetic estimates of the timing and route of entry have been constrained by the lack of suitable calibration points and low genetic diversity of Native...

Data from: Olfactory and visual plant cues as drivers of selective herbivory

Rebecca S. Stutz, Benjamin M. Croak, Nicholas Proschogo, Peter B. Banks & Clare McArthur
Food quality is an important consideration in the foraging strategy of all animals, including herbivores. Those that can detect and assess the nutritional value of plants from afar, using senses such as smell and sight, can forage more efficiently than those that must assess food quality by taste alone. Selective foraging not only affects herbivore fitness but can influence the structure and composition of plant communities, yet little is known about how olfactory and visual...

Data from: Female genital cosmetic surgery: a cross-sectional survey exploring knowledge, attitude and practice of general practitioners

Magdalena Simonis, Ramesh Manocha & Jason J. Ong
Objective To explore general practitioner's (GP) knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding female genital cosmetic surgery (FGCS) in Australia. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Australia. Sample GPs who attended a women's health seminar and GPs who subscribed to a non-governmental, national health professional organisation database that provides education to primary care professionals. Method A national online survey of GPs was conducted for the 10-week period, starting 1 week prior and 2 months after a Women's Health seminar...

Data from: Corticosterone: a costly mediator of signal honesty in sand lizards

Willow R. Lindsay, Erik Wapstra, Bengt Silverin & Mats Olsson
The mechanisms underlying honest signal expression remain elusive and may involve the integration of social and physiological costs. Corticosterone is a socially modulated metabolic hormone that mediates energy investment and behavior and may therefore function to deter dishonest signal expression. We examined the relationship between corticosterone and green badge coloration in male sand lizards (Lacerta agilis), hypothesizing that physiological and behavioral costs resulting from elevated baseline glucocorticoids function in maintenance of honest signal expression. We...

Data from: A multi-decade dataset of monthly beach profile surveys and inshore wave forcing at Narrabeen, Australia

Ian L. Turner, Mitchell D. Harley, Andrew D. Short, Joshua A. Simmons, Melissa A. Bracs, Matthew S. Phillips & Kristen D. Splinter
Long-term observational datasets that record and quantify variability, changes and trends in beach morphology at sandy coastlines together with the accompanying wave climate are rare. A monthly beach profile survey program commenced in April 1976 at Narrabeen located on Sydney’s Northern Beaches in southeast Australia is one of just a handful of sites worldwide where on-going and uninterrupted beach monitoring now spans multiple decades. With the Narrabeen survey program reaching its 40-year milestone in April...

Data from: Naiveté is not forever: responses of a vulnerable native rodent to its long term alien predators

Alexandra J. R. Carthey & Peter B. Banks
Alien predators have wreaked havoc on isolated endemic and island fauna worldwide, a phenomenon generally attributed to prey naiveté, or a failure to display effective antipredator behaviour due to a lack of experience. While the failure to recognise and/or respond to a novel predator has devastating impacts in the short term after predators are introduced, few studies have asked whether medium to long term experience with alien predators enables native species to overcome their naiveté....

Data from: Evaluating the impact of genomic data and priors on Bayesian estimates of the angiosperm evolutionary timescale

Charles S. P. Foster, Hervé Sauquet, Marlien Van Der Merwe, Hannah McPherson, Maurizio Rossetto & Simon Y. W. Ho
The evolutionary timescale of angiosperms has long been a key question in biology. Molecular estimates of this timescale have shown considerable variation, being influenced by differences in taxon sampling, gene sampling, fossil calibrations, evolutionary models, and choices of priors. Here, we analyze a data set comprising 76 protein-coding genes from the chloroplast genomes of 195 taxa spanning 86 families, including novel genome sequences for 11 taxa, to evaluate the impact of models, priors, and gene...

Data from: Parental exposure modulates the effects of UV-B on offspring in guppies

Ensiyeh Ghanizadeh Kazerouni, Craig E. Franklin & Frank Seebacher
1.The environment experienced by parents can alter offspring phenotypes. Such developmental plasticity is beneficial when it optimises offspring responses to their prevailing environment. Plasticity may be detrimental, however, if there is a mismatch between parental and offspring environments, although reversible acclimation within individuals could counteract a developmental mismatch. 2.UV-B radiation damages cells directly and by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. There are indications that the developmental environment can influence ROS defences, which could enhance...

Data from: Shrub encroachment is linked to extirpation of an apex predator

Christopher E. Gordon, David J. Eldridge, William J. Ripple, Mathew S. Crowther, Ben D. Moore & Mike Letnic
The abundance of shrubs has increased throughout Earth's arid lands. This ‘shrub encroachment’ has been linked to livestock grazing, fire-suppression and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations facilitating shrub recruitment. Apex predators initiate trophic cascades which can influence the abundance of many species across multiple trophic levels within ecosystems. Extirpation of apex predators is linked inextricably to pastoralism, but has not been considered as a factor contributing to shrub encroachment. Here, we ask if trophic cascades triggered...

Data from: Enhanced decomposition and nitrogen mineralisation sustain rapid growth of Eucalyptus regnans after wildfire

Feike A. Dijkstra, Meaghan Jenkins, Vivien De Remy De Courcelles, Claudia Keitel, Margaret M. Barbour, Zachary E. Kayler & Mark A. Adams
Eucalyptus regnans grows rapidly from seed after wildfires, out-competing other species, thereby forming pure stands of mature forests that rank amongst the world's most carbon dense. By global standards, these forests grow on infertile soils. It is unclear how E. regnans is able to obtain large amounts nitrogen (N) from these infertile soils to support its rapid growth after fire. We measured carbon (C) and N stored in plant biomass and photosynthetic rates of E....

Data from: Complementary food resources of carnivory and frugivory affect local abundance of an omnivorous carnivore

Scott E. Nielsen, Terrence A. Larsen, Gordon B. Stenhouse & Sean C. P. Coogan
A major unresolved question for omnivorous carnivores, like most species of bears, is to what degree are populations influenced by bottom–up (food supply) or top–down (human-caused mortality) processes. Most previous work on bear populations has focused on factors that limit survival (top–down) assuming little effect of food resource supply. When food resources are considered, most often they consider only the availability/supply of a single resource, particularly marine-subsidized or terrestrial sources of protein (carnivory) or alternately...

Data from: Immune-challenged fish up-regulate their metabolic scope to support locomotion

Camille Bonneaud, Robbie S. Wilson & Frank Seebacher
Energy-based trade-offs occur when investment in one fitness-related trait diverts energy away from other traits. The extent to which such trade-offs are shaped by limits on the rate of conversion of energy ingested in food (e.g. carbohydrates) into chemical energy (ATP) by oxidative metabolism rather than by the amount of food ingested in the first place is, however, unclear. Here we tested whether the ATP required for mounting an immune response will lead to a...

Data from: Adult dietary protein has age- and context-dependent effects on male post-copulatory performance

Erin L. Macartney, Angela J. Crean & R. Bonduriansky
The highly-conserved effect of dietary protein restriction on life-span and ageing is observed in both sexes and across a vast range of taxa. This extension of life-span is frequently accompanied by a reduction in female fecundity and it has been hypothesised that individuals may reallocate resources away from reproduction and into somatic maintenance. However, effects of dietary protein restriction on male reproduction are less consistent, suggesting that these effects may depend on other environmental parameters....

Data from: Mesopredator management: effects of red fox control on the abundance, diet and use of space by feral cats

Robyn Molsher, Alan E. Newsome, Thomas M. Newsome & Christopher R. Dickman
Apex predators are subject to lethal control in many parts of the world to minimize their impacts on human industries and livelihoods. Diverse communities of smaller predators - mesopredators - often remain after apex predator removal. Despite concern that these mesopredators may be 'released' in the absence of the apex predator and exert negative effects on each other and on co-occurring prey, these interactions have been little studied. Here, we investigate the potential effects of...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    448
  • 2021
    82
  • 2020
    51
  • 2019
    33
  • 2018
    39
  • 2017
    45
  • 2016
    44
  • 2015
    26
  • 2014
    18
  • 2013
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    406
  • Text
    220
  • Collection
    120
  • Report
    23
  • Image
    20
  • Other
    10
  • Audiovisual
    5
  • Conference Paper
    2
  • Dissertation
    2
  • Journal Article
    2
  • Book Chapter
    1
  • Book
    1
  • Output Management Plan
    1
  • Preprint
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Sydney
    428
  • The University of Sydney
    386
  • UNSW Sydney
    129
  • Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College
    78
  • Sichuan University
    68
  • Fudan University
    64
  • University of Newcastle Australia
    61
  • Chinese PLA General Hospital
    60
  • Zhejiang University
    58
  • Capital Medical University
    54