291 Works

Data from: Vocalisations of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the Bremer Canyon, Western Australia

Rebecca Wellard, Christine Erbe, Leila Fouda & Michelle Blewitt
To date, there has been no dedicated study in Australian waters on the acoustics of killer whales. Hence no information has been published on the sounds produced by killer whales from this region. Here we present the first acoustical analysis of recordings collected off the Western Australian coast. Underwater sounds produced by Australian killer whales were recorded during the months of February and March 2014 and 2015 in the Bremer Canyon in Western Australia. Vocalisations...

Data from: Subordinate plants mitigate drought effects on soil ecosystem processes by stimulating fungi

Pierre Mariotte, Bjorn J. M. Robroek, Vincent E. J. Jassey & Alexandre Buttler
The subordinate insurance hypothesis suggests that highly diverse communities contain greater numbers of subordinate species than less diverse communities. It has previously been reported that subordinate species can improve grassland productivity during drought, but the underlying mechanisms remain undetermined. Using a combination of subordinate species removal and summer drought, we show that soil processes play a critical role in community resistance to drought. Interestingly, subordinate species drive soil microbial community structure and largely mitigate the...

Data from: Landscape-specific thresholds in the relationship between species richness and natural land cover

Jeremy S. Simmonds, Berndt J. Van Rensburg, Ayesha I. T. Tulloch & Martine Maron
1. Thresholds in the relationship between species richness and natural land cover can inform landscape-level vegetation protection and restoration targets. However, landscapes differ considerably in composition and other environmental attributes. If the effect of natural land cover on species richness depends on (i.e. interacts with) these attributes, and this affects the value of thresholds in this relationship, such dependencies must be considered when using thresholds to guide landscape management. 2. We hypothesised that the amount...

Data from: Human macular Müller cells rely more on serine biosynthesis to combat oxidative stress than those from the periphery

Ting Zhang, Ling Zhu, Michele Catherine Madigan, Wei Liu, Weiyong Shen, Svetlana Cherepanoff, Fanfan Zhou, Shaoxue Zeng, Jianhai Du & Mark Cedric Gillies
The human macula is more susceptible than the peripheral retina to developing blinding conditions such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy. A key difference between them may be the nature of their Müller cells. We found primary cultured Müller cells from macula and peripheral retina display significant morphological and transcriptomic differences. Macular Müller cells expressed more Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase (PHGDH, a rate-limiting enzyme in serine synthesis) than peripheral Müller cells. The serine synthesis, glycolytic and mitochondrial...

Data from: Developmental diet irreversibly shapes male post-copulatory traits in the neriid fly (Telostylinus angusticollis)

Erin L. Macartney, Philip R. Nicovich, Russell Bonduriansky & Angela J. Crean
Nutrient availability has been shown to influence investment in many fitness related traits, including male reproductive success. Many studies have demonstrated that a reduction in nutrient availability alters male post-copulatory trait expression, with some studies demonstrating an effect of developmental nutrients and others, an effect of adult nutrients. However, few studies have manipulated both developmental and adult nutrients in the same experiment. Therefore, it is not clear what life-stage has the greatest effect on post-copulatory...

Data from: Two speed invasion: assisted and intrinsic dispersal of common mynas over 150-years of colonization

Kyle M. Ewart, Andrea S. Griffin, Rebecca N. Johnson, Salit Kark, Tali Magory Cohen, Nathan Lo & Richard E. Major
Aim: Despite the common myna’s widespread distribution, and the significant impact it has caused in parts of its non-native range, there have been no comprehensive genomic studies of its invasion of any region. We aimed to characterize the common myna invasion of the Australian continent to understand its population genetic landscape, introduction history, dispersal characteristics, and the interconnectedness between different source populations and invasive fronts. Location: Common mynas from 26 geographical locations spanning the Australian...

Data from: Range-wide genomic data synthesis reveals transatlantic vicariance and secondary contact in Atlantic cod

Robert Fairweather, Ian R. Bradbury, Sarah J. Heylar, Mark De Bruyn, Nina O. Therkildsen, Paul Bentzen, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen & Gary R. Carvalho
Recent advances in genetic and genomic analysis have greatly improved our understanding of spatial population structure in marine species. However, studies addressing phylogeographic patterns at oceanic spatial scales remain rare. In Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), existing range‐wide examinations suggest significant transatlantic divergence, although the fine‐scale contemporary distribution of populations and potential for secondary contact are largely unresolved. Here, we explore transatlantic phylogeography in Atlantic cod using a data‐synthesis approach, integrating multiple genome‐wide single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)...

Data from: Quantifying and reducing uncertainties in estimated soil CO2 fluxes with hierarchical data-model integration

Kiona Ogle, Edmund Ryan, Fieke A. Dijkstra, Elise Pendall & Feike A. Dijkstra
Non-steady state chambers are often employed to measure soil CO2 fluxes. CO2 concentrations (C) in the headspace are sampled at different times (t), and fluxes (f) are calculated from regressions of C versus t based a limited number of observations. Variability in the data can lead to poor fits and unreliable f estimates; groups with too few observations or poor fits are often discarded, resulting in “missing” f values. We solve these problems by fitting...

Data from: Constructing an invasion machine: the rapid evolution of a dispersal-enhancing phenotype during the cane toad invasion of Australia

Cameron M. Hudson, Matthew R. McCurry, Petra Lundgren, Colin R. McHenry & Rick Shine
Biological invasions can induce rapid evolutionary change. As cane toads (Rhinella marina) have spread across tropical Australia over an 80-year period, their rate of invasion has increased from around 15 to 60 km per annum. Toads at the invasion front disperse much faster and further than conspecifics from range-core areas, and their offspring inherit that rapid dispersal rate. We investigated morphological changes that have accompanied this dramatic acceleration, by conducting three-dimensional morphometric analyses of toads...

Data from: Proto-cooperation: group hunting sailfish improve hunting success by alternating attacks on grouping prey

James E. Herbert-Read, Pawel Romanczuk, Stefan Krause, Daniel Strömbom, Pierre Couillaud, Paolo Domenici, Ralf H.J.M. Kurvers, Stefano Marras, John F. Steffensen, Alexander D.M. Wilson, Jens Krause, Alexander D. M. Wilson & Ralf H. J. M. Kurvers
We present evidence of a novel form of group hunting. Individual sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) alternate attacks with other group members on their schooling prey (Sardinella aurita). While only 24% of attacks result in prey capture, multiple prey are injured in 95% of attacks, resulting in an increase of injured fish in the school with the number of attacks. How quickly prey are captured is positively correlated with the level of injury of the school, suggesting...

Data from: Evolution of a butterfly dispersal syndrome

Delphine Legrand, Nicolas Larranaga, Romain Bertrand, Simon Ducatez, Olivier Calvez, Virginie M. Stevens & Michel Baguette
The existence of dispersal syndromes contrasting disperser from resident phenotypes within populations has been intensively documented across taxa. However, how such suites of phenotypic traits emerge and are maintained is largely unknown, although deciphering the processes shaping the evolution of dispersal phenotypes is a key in ecology and evolution. In this study, we created artificial populations of a butterfly, in which we controlled for individual phenotypes and measured experimentally the roles of selection and genetic...

Data from: Ultraviolet B radiation alters movement and thermal selection of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

Frank Seebacher, Ensiyeh Ghanizadeh Kazerouni & Craig E. Franklin
Temperature and ultraviolet B (UV-B) interact in causing cellular damage and impairing locomotor performance. Here, we test the hypothesis that movement and thermal selection of zebrafish (Danio rerio) change in the presence of UV-B, and in particular, that fish which were chronically exposed to UV-B avoid high and low temperature extremes to maximize activities of antioxidant enzymes. Fish chronically (two to three weeks) exposed to UV-B had increased reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced damage to proteins...

Self-compatible blueberry cultivars require fewer floral visits to maximise fruit production than a partially self-incompatible cultivar

Liam K. Kendall, Vesna Gagic, Lisa Evans, Brian Cutting, Jessica Scalzo, Yolanda Hanusch, Jeremy Jones, Maurizio Rocchetti, Carolyn Sonter, Matthew Keir & Romina Rader
Effective pollination is a complex phenomenon determined by the outcome of the interaction between pollen transfer and a plants’ pollinator dependency, yet most studies investigate pollinator effectiveness without consideration of plant mating system differences. We investigated pollinator effectiveness in three types of blueberry that differed in their degree of pollinator dependency as measured by plant mating system: two self-compatible highbush cultivars and one partially self-incompatible rabbiteye cultivar. We quantified pollinator effectiveness as a function of...

Prey-switching does not protect a generalist turtle from bioenergetic consequences when its preferred food is scarce

James Van Dyke, Kristen Petrov, Ricky-John Spencer, Natasha Malkiewicz, Jessica Lewis & Claudia Keitel
Background: Optimal foraging theory explains how animals make foraging decisions based on the availability, nutritional content, and handling times of different food types. Generalists solve this problem by consuming a variety of food types, and switch between them with relative ease. Specialists eat few food types, and may starve if those food types are not available. We integrated stable isotope analyses with previously-published stomach contents and environmental data to investigate how the foraging ecologies of...

Data from: Development and validation of a RAD-Seq target-capture based genotyping assay for routine application in advanced black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) breeding programs

Jarrod L. Guppy, David B. Jones, Shannon R. Kjeldsen, Agnes Le Port, Mehar S. Khatkar, Nicholas M. Wade, Melony J. Sellars, Eike J. Steinig, Herman W. Raadsma, Dean R. Jerry & Kyall R. Zenger
Background The development of genome-wide genotyping resources has provided terrestrial livestock and crop industries with the unique ability to accurately assess genomic relationships between individuals, uncover the genetic architecture of commercial traits, as well as identify superior individuals for selection based on their specific genetic profile. Utilising recent advancements in de-novo genome-wide genotyping technologies, it is now possible to provide aquaculture industries with these same important genotyping resources, even in the absence of existing genome...

Data from: Sex- and tissue-specific differences in telomere length in a reptile

Nicky Rollings, Christopher R. Friesen, Camilla M. Whittington, Rasmus Johansson, Richard Shine & Mats Olsson
The usage of telomere length (TL) in blood as a proxy for the TL of other tissues relies on the assumption that telomere dynamics across all tissues are similar. However, telomere attrition can be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) which may vary with metabolic rate, which itself varies across organs depending upon the life history strategy of an organism. Thus we chose to measure the telomeres of various cell types in juvenile painted dragon...

Data from: Effects of male telomeres on probability of paternity in sand lizards

Angela Pauliny, Emily Miller, Nicky Rollings, Erik Wapstra, Donald Blomqvist, Christopher Friesen, Mats Olsson & Chris R. Friesen
Standardized swim-up trials are used in IVF clinics to select particularly motile spermatozoa in order to increase the probability of a successful fertilization. Such trials demonstrate that sperm with longer telomeres have higher motility and lower levels of DNA damage. Regardless of whether sperm motility, and successful swim-up to fertilization sites, is a direct or correlational effect of telomere length or DNA damage, covariation between telomere length and sperm performance predicts a relationship between telomere...

Data from: Mitochondrial rate variation among lineages of passerine birds

Jacqueline M. T. Nguyen & Simon Y. W. Ho
The order Passeriformes comprises the majority of extant avian species. Analyses of molecular data have provided important insights into the evolution of this diverse order. However, molecular estimates of the evolutionary and demographic timescales of passerine species have been hindered by a lack of reliable calibrations. This has led to a reliance on the application of standard substitution rates to mitochondrial DNA data, particularly rates estimated from analyses of the gene encoding cytochrome b (CYTB)....

Data from: Selection and constraints on offspring size-number trade-offs in sand lizards (Lacerta agilis)

Gabriella Ljungström, Martin Stjernstedt, Erik Wapstra & Mats Olsson
The trade-off between offspring size and number is a central component of life-history theory, postulating that larger investment into offspring size inevitably decreases offspring number. This trade-off is generally discussed in terms of genetic, physiological or morphological constraints; however, as among-individual differences can mask individual trade-offs, the underlying mechanisms may be difficult to reveal. In this study, we use multivariate analyses to investigate whether there is a trade-off between offspring size and number in a...

Data from: The behavioural response of migrating humpback whales to a full seismic air gun array

Rebecca A. Dunlop, Michael J. Noad, Robert D. McCauley, Eric Kniest, Robert Slade, David Paton & Douglas H. Cato
Despite concerns on the effects of noise from seismic survey air guns on marine organisms, there remains uncertainty in the biological significance of any response. This study quantifies and interprets the response of migrating humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) to a 3130 cui (51.3l) commercial air gun array. We compare the behavioural responses to active trials (array operational; n = 34 whale groups), with responses to control trials (source vessel towing the array while silent; n...

Data from: Elevated CO2 and water addition enhance nitrogen turnover in grassland plants with implications for temporal stability

Feike A. Dijkstra, Yolima Carrillo, Dana M. Blumenthal, Kevin E. Mueller, Daniel R. LeCain, Jack A. Morgan, Tamara J. Zelikova, David G. Williams, Ronald F. Follett, Elise Pendall & Dan R. LeCain
Temporal variation in soil nitrogen (N) availability affects growth of grassland communities that differ in their use and reuse of N. In a seven-year-long climate change experiment in a semiarid grassland, the temporal stability of plant biomass production varied with plant N turnover (reliance on externally acquired N relative to internally recycled N). Species with high N turnover were less stable in time compared to species with low N turnover. In contrast, N turnover at...

Data from: Transgenerational effects and acclimation affect dispersal in guppies

Amélie Le Roy & Frank Seebacher
1. Evolutionary theory predicts that intergenerational environmental fluctuations lead to transgenerational effects where offspring phenotypes are matched to conditions experienced by previous generations. However, in fluctuating environments, transgenerational effects can be detrimental by causing mismatches between ancestral and offspring environments. Acclimation in offspring could alleviate these negative effects.2. We determined whether the interaction between transgenerational effects and acclimation affects locomotor performance and dispersal in guppies (Poecilia reticulata). In a fully factorial experiment, we tested the...

Data from: Experimental heatwaves negatively impact sperm quality in the zebra finch

Laura L. Hurley, Callum S. McDiarmid, Christopher R. Friesen, Simon C. Griffith & Melissah Rowe
For sexually reproducing species, functionally competent sperm are critical to reproduction. While high atmospheric temperatures are known to influence the timing of breeding, incubation and reproductive success in birds, the effect of temperature on sperm quality remains largely unexplored. Here, we experimentally investigated the impact of ecologically relevant extreme temperatures on cloacal temperature and sperm morphology and motility in zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata. We periodically sampled males exposed to 30°C or 40°C temperatures daily for...

Data from: Selection at the Esterase-2 locus of Drosophila buzzatii? Perturbation-reperturbation experiments

J. Stuart F. Barker & Peter C. Thomson
Apparent selection affecting starch gel electrophoretic alleles at the Esterase-2 locus of Drosophila buzzatii has been detected in laboratory and natural populations. Perturbation-reperturbation of allele frequencies in replicated laboratory populations attempts to test direct selective effects at the locus versus effects of linked loci. Sequential gel electrophoresis has identified more alleles within starch classes, and three of these alleles (within the a, b and c starch alleles) were used in cage population experiments. Allele a/1.00/1.00/1.00...

Data from: Towards a synthesis of frameworks in nutritional ecology: interacting effects of protein, carbohydrate, and phosphorus on field cricket fitness

Sarah J. Harrison, David Raubenheimer, Stephen J. Simpson, Jean-Guy J. Godin & Susan M. Bertram
Phosphorus has been identified as an important determinant of nutrition-related biological variation. The macronutrients protein (P) and carbohydrates (C), both alone and interactively, are known to affect animal performance. No study, however, has investigated the importance of phosphorus relative to dietary protein or carbohydrates, or the interactive effects of phosphorus with these macronutrients, on fitness-related traits in animals. We used a nutritional geometry framework to address this question in adult field crickets (Gryllus veletis). Our...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    7
  • 2020
    51
  • 2019
    33
  • 2018
    39
  • 2017
    45
  • 2016
    44
  • 2015
    26
  • 2014
    18
  • 2013
    17
  • 2012
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    278
  • Text
    13

Affiliations

  • University of Sydney
    291
  • University of Queensland
    20
  • Macquarie University
    15
  • University of Wollongong
    12
  • University of Melbourne
    12
  • Monash University
    12
  • UNSW Sydney
    12
  • Australian National University
    10
  • University of Otago
    8
  • Southern Cross University
    6