291 Works

Data from: Restricting access to invasion hubs enables sustained control of an invasive vertebrate

Mike Letnic, Jonathan K. Webb, Tim J. Jessop & Tim Dempster
Biological invasions often occur through expansion of satellite populations that become established at ‘invasion hubs’. Invasion hubs can result from random dispersal events, but frequently arise when invading individuals actively choose habitats using cues that signify high-quality environments where the fitness consequences are positive. Theoretical studies suggest that targeted control at invasion hubs can effectively suppress the populations and impacts of invaders. In arid Australia, small dams that provide water for livestock function as invasion...

Data from: Temperature-related variation in growth rate, size, maturation, and lifespan in a marine herbivorous fish over a latitudinal gradient

Elizabeth D. L. Trip, Kendall D. Clements, David Raubenheimer & J. Howard Choat
1. In ectotherms, growth rate, body size, and maturation rate co-vary with temperature, with the direction and magnitude of variation predicted by the Temperature-Size Rule (TSR). Nutritional quality or availability of food, however, may vary over latitudinal gradients, resulting in ambiguous effects on body size and maturation rate. The Temperature-Constraint Hypothesis (TCH) predicts that marine herbivorous ectotherms are nutritionally compromised at latitudes exceeding 30o. This provides an opportunity to resolve the contrasting demographic responses of...

Data from: Sexual conflict over mating in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis) as indicated by experimental manipulation of genitalia

Christopher R. Friesen, Emily J. Uhrig, Mattie K. Squire, Robert T. Mason & Patricia L. R. Brennan
Sexual conflict over mating can result in sex specific morphologies and behaviors that allow each sex to exert control over the outcome of reproduction. Genital traits, in particular, are often directly involved in conflict interactions. Via genital manipulation, we experimentally investigated whether genital traits in red-sided garter snakes influence copulation duration and formation of a copulatory plug. The hemipenes of male red-sided garter snakes have a large basal spine that inserts into the female cloaca...

Data from: The contrasting phylodynamics of human influenza B viruses

Dhanasekaran Vijaykrishna, Edward C. Holmes, Udayan Joseph, Mathieu Fourment, Yvonne C. F. Su, Rebecca Halpin, Raphael T. C. Lee, Yi-Mo Deng, Vithiagaran Gunalan, Xudong Lin, Tim Stockwell, Nadia B. Fedorova, Bin Zhou, Natalie Spirason, Denise K. Kühnert, Veronika Bošková, Tanja Stadler, Anna-Maria Costa, Dominic E. Dwyer, Q. Sue Huang, Lance C. Jennings, William Rawlinson, Sheena G. Sullivan, Aeron C. Hurt, Sebastian Maurer-Stroh … & Raphael TC Lee
A complex interplay of viral, host and ecological factors shape the spatio-temporal incidence and evolution of human influenza viruses. Although considerable attention has been paid to influenza A viruses, a lack of equivalent data means that an integrated evolutionary and epidemiological framework has until now not been available for influenza B viruses, despite their significant disease burden. Through the analysis of over 900 full genomes from an epidemiological collection of more than 26,000 strains from...

Data from: Spatial variation in age structure among populations of a colonial marine snake: the influence of ectothermy

Xavier Bonnet, François Brischoux, David Pinaud, Richard Shine, Catherine Louise Michel, Jean Clobert & Thomas Fauvel
1. Several tetrapod lineages that have evolved to exploit marine environments (e.g. seals, seabirds, sea kraits) continue to rely upon land for reproduction and, thus, form dense colonies on suitable islands. 2. In birds and mammals (endotherms), the offspring cannot survive without their parents. Terrestrial colonies contain all age classes. In reptiles (ectotherms), this constraint is relaxed, because offspring are independent from birth. Hence, each age class has the potential to select sites with characteristics...

Data from: Initiation and spread of escape waves within animal groups

James E. Herbert-Read, Jerome Buhl, Feng Hu, Ashley J. W. Ward & David J. T. Sumpter
The exceptional reactivity of animal collectives to predatory attacks is thought to be owing to rapid, but local, transfer of information between group members. These groups turn together in unison and produce escape waves. However, it is not clear how escape waves are created from local interactions, nor is it understood how these patterns are shaped by natural selection. By startling schools of fish with a simulated attack in an experimental arena, we demonstrate that...

Data from: Differences in developmental strategies between long-settled and invasion-front populations of the cane toad in Australia

Simon Ducatez, Michael Crossland & Rick Shine
Phenotypic plasticity can enhance a species’ ability to persist in a new and stressful environment, so that reaction norms are expected to evolve as organisms encounter novel environments. Biological invasions provide a robust system to investigate such changes. We measured the rates of early growth and development in tadpoles of invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) in Australia, from a range of locations and at different larval densities. Populations in long-colonized areas have had the opportunity...

Data from: The nutritional balancing act of a large herbivore: an experiment with captive moose (Alces alces L)

Annika M. Felton, Adam Felton, David Raubenheimer, Stephen J. Simpson, Sophie J. Krizsan, Per-Ola Hedwall & Caroline Stolter
The nutrient balancing hypothesis proposes that, when sufficient food is available, the primary goal of animal diet selection is to obtain a nutritionally balanced diet. This hypothesis can be tested using the Geometric Framework for nutrition (GF). The GF enables researchers to study patterns of nutrient intake (e.g. macronutrients; protein, carbohydrates, fat), interactions between the different nutrients, and how an animal resolves the potential conflict between over-eating one or more nutrients and under-eating others during...

Data from: Unexpected positive and negative effects of continuing inbreeding in one of the world’s most inbred wild animals

Emily L. Weiser, Catherine E. Grueber, Euan S. Kennedy & Ian G. Jamieson
Inbreeding depression, the reduced fitness of offspring of related individuals, is a central theme in evolutionary biology. Inbreeding effects are influenced by the genetic makeup of a population, which is driven by any history of genetic bottlenecks and genetic drift. The Chatham Island black robin represents a case of extreme inbreeding following two severe population bottlenecks. We tested whether inbreeding measured by a 20-year pedigree predicted variation in fitness among individuals, despite the high mean...

Data from: Co-adjustment of yolk antioxidants and androgens in birds

Mathieu Giraudeau & Simon Ducatez
Mothers can shape the developmental trajectory of their offspring through the transmission of resources such as hormones, antioxidants or immunoglobulins. Over the last two decades, an abundant literature on maternal effects in birds has shown that several of these compounds (i.e. androgens, glucocorticoids and antioxidants) often influence the same offspring phenotypic traits (i.e. growth, immunity or oxidative stress levels), making interaction effects between egg components a likely scenario. However, the potential interactive effects of maternally...

Data from: Body size affects the strength of social interactions and spatial organization of a schooling fish (Pseudomugil signifer)

Maksym Romenskyy, James E. Herbert-Read, Ashley J. W. Ward, David J.T. Sumpter & David J. T. Sumpter
While a rich variety of self-propelled particle models propose to explain the collective motion of fish and other animals, rigorous statistical comparison between models and data remains a challenge. Plausible models should be flexible enough to capture changes in the collective behaviour of animal groups at their different developmental stages and group sizes. Here, we analyse the statistical properties of schooling fish (Pseudomugil signifer) through a combination of experiments and simulations. We make novel use...

Data from: Thermal physiology: a new dimension of the pace-of-life syndrome

Celine T. Goulet, Mike B. Thompson, Marcus Michelangeli, Bob B.M. Wong, David G. Chapple & Bob B. M. Wong
1) Current syndrome research focuses primarily on behavior with few incorporating components of physiology. One such syndrome is the Pace-of-Life Syndrome (POLS) which describes covariation between behaviour, metabolism immunity, hormonal response, and life history traits. Despite the strong effect temperature has on behavior, thermal physiology has yet to be considered within this syndrome framework. 2) We proposed the POLS to be extended to include a new dimension, the cold-hot axis. Under this premise, it is...

Data from: Plio-Pleistocene phylogeography of the Southeast Asian Blue Panchax killifish, Aplocheilus panchax

Samantha V. Beck, Gary R. Carvalho, Axel Barlow, Lukas Rüber, Heok Hui Tan, Estu Nugroho, Daisy Wowor, Siti Azizah Mohd Nor, Fabian Herder, Zainal A. Muchlisin & Mark De Bruyn
The complex climatic and geological history of Southeast Asia has shaped this region’s high biodiversity. In particular, sea level fluctuations associated with repeated glacial cycles during the Pleistocene both facilitated, and limited, connectivity between populations. In this study, we used data from two mitochondrial and three anonymous nuclear markers to determine whether a fresh/brackish water killifish, Aplocheilus panchax, Hamilton, 1822, could be used to further understand how climatic oscillations and associated sea level fluctuations have...

Data from: Pedigree analysis reveals a generational decline in reproductive success of captive Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii): implications for captive management of threatened species

Katherine A. Farquharson, Carolyn J. Hogg & Catherine E. Grueber
Captive breeding programs are an increasingly popular tool to augment the conservation of threatened wild populations. Many programs keep detailed pedigrees, which are used to prescribe breeding targets to meet demographic and genetic goals. Annual breeding targets are based on previous productivity, but do not account for changes in reproductive success that may occur over generations in captivity and which may impair the ability of a program to meet its goals. We utilise a large...

Data from: Obesity-induced decreases in muscle performance are not reversed by weight loss

F. Seebacher, J. Tallis, K. McShea & R. S. James
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Obesity can affect muscle phenotypes, and may thereby constrain movement and energy expenditure. Weight loss is a common and intuitive intervention for obesity, but it is not known whether the effects of obesity on muscle function are reversible by weight loss. Here we tested whether obesity-induced changes in muscle metabolic and contractile phenotypes are reversible by weight loss. SUBJECTS/METHODS: We used zebrafish (Danio rerio) in a factorial design to compare energy metabolism, locomotor capacity,...

Data from: Atoll-scale patterns in coral reef community structure: Human signatures on Ulithi Atoll, Micronesia

Nicole L. Crane, Peter Nelson, Avigdor Abelson, Kristin Precoda, , Giacomo Bernardi & Michelle Paddack
The dynamic relationship between reefs and the people who utilize them at a subsistence level is poorly understood. This paper characterizes atoll-scale patterns in shallow coral reef habitat and fish community structure, and correlates these with environmental characteristics and anthropogenic factors, critical to conservation efforts for the reefs and the people who depend on them. Hierarchical clustering analyses by site for benthic composition and fish community resulted in the same 3 major clusters: cluster 1–oceanic...

Data from: Selective sweeps of mitochondrial DNA can drive the evolution of uniparental inheritance

Joshua R. Christie & Madeleine Beekman
While the uniparental (or maternal) inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is widespread, the reasons for its evolution remain unclear. Two main hypotheses have been proposed: selection against individuals containing different mtDNAs (heteroplasmy) and selection against “selfish” mtDNA mutations. Recently, uniparental inheritance was shown to promote adaptive evolution in mtDNA, potentially providing a third hypothesis for its evolution. Here we explore this hypothesis theoretically and ask if the accumulation of beneficial mutations provides a sufficient fitness...

Data from: Macronutrient signature of dietary generalism in an ecologically diverse primate in the wild

Zhen-Wei Cui, Zhen-Long Wang, Qi Shao, David Raubenheimer & Ji-Qi Lu
A question of considerable importance is why some animals are able to succeed on a wide range of diets while others are more tightly constrained. Theory predicts that generalists should show a flexible response for macronutrient acquisition in the face of ecologically-driven constraint on the nutritional balance of available foods, which in the modelling framework of nutritional geometry has been quantitatively characterized as an “equal distance” regulatory model. This prediction, which has empirical support from...

Data from: Subfamily-dependent alternative reproductive strategies in worker honey bees

Boris Yagound, Michael Duncan, Nadine C. Chapman & Benjamin P. Oldroyd
Functional worker sterility is the defining feature of insect societies. Yet, workers are sometimes found reproducing in their own or foreign colonies. The proximate mechanisms underlying these alternative reproductive phenotypes are key to understanding how reproductive altruism and selfishness are balanced in eusocial insects. In this study we show that in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies the social environment of a worker, i.e. the presence and relatedness of the queens in a worker’s natal colony...

Data from: Comparison of methods for molecular species delimitation across a range of speciation scenarios

Arong Luo, Cheng Ling, Simon Y.W. Ho, Chao-Dong Zhu & Simon Y W Ho
Species are fundamental units in biological research and can be defined on the basis of various operational criteria. There has been growing use of molecular approaches for species delimitation. Among the most widely used methods, the generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) and Poisson tree processes (PTP) were designed for the analysis of single-locus data but are often applied to concatenations of multilocus data. In contrast, the Bayesian multispecies coalescent approach in the software BPP explicitly models...

Data from: The relationship of body condition, superoxide dismutase, and superoxide with sperm performance

Christopher R. Friesen, Simon P. De Graaf & Mats Olsson
Sperm competition theory predicts a negative correlation between somatic investment in traits that aid in pre- and postcopulatory sexual selection. Sperm performance is critical for postcopulatory success but are susceptible to damage by free radicals such as superoxide radicals generated during mitochondrial respiration (mtSOx). Males can ameliorate damage to spermatozoa by investing in the production of antioxidants, like superoxide dismutase (SOD), which may act as a mechanistic link for pre and postcopulatory trade-offs. Some male...

Data from: Does habitat specialization shape the evolutionary potential of wild bird populations?

Ivain Martinossi-Allibert, Joanne Clavel, Simon Ducatez, I. Le Viol & Celine Teplitsky
Because specialist species evolved in more temporally and spatially homogeneous environments than generalist species, they are supposed to experience less fluctuating selection. For this reason, we expect specialists to show lower overall genetic variation as compared to generalists. We also expect populations from specialist species to be smaller and more fragmented, with lower neutral genetic diversity. We tested these hypotheses by investigating patterns of genetic diversity along a habitat specialization gradient in wild birds, based...

Data from: Direct and trans-generational effects of male and female gut microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster

Juliano Morimoto, Stephen J. Simpson & Fleur Ponton
There is increasing evidence of the far-reaching effects of gut bacteria on physiological and behavioural traits, yet the fitness-related consequences of changes in the gut bacteria composition of sexually interacting individuals remain unknown. To address this question, we manipulated the gut microbiota of fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, by monoinfecting flies with either Acetobacter pomorum (AP) or Lactobacillus plantarum (LP). Re-inoculated individuals were paired in all treatment combinations. LP-infected males had longer mating duration and induced...

Data from: Facultative oviparity in a viviparous skink (Saiphos equalis)

Melanie K. Laird, Michael B. Thompson & Camilla M. Whittington
Facultative changes in parity mode (oviparity to viviparity, and vice versa) are rare in vertebrates, yet offer fascinating opportunities to investigate the role of reproductive lability in parity mode evolution. Here we report apparent facultative oviparity by a viviparous female of the bimodally reproductive skink Saiphos equalis- the first report of different parity modes within a vertebrate clutch. Eggs oviposited facultatively possess shell characteristics of both viviparous and oviparous S. equalis, demonstrating that egg coverings...

Data from: Resource availability and sexual size dimorphism: differential effects of prey abundance on the growth rates of tropical snakes

Gregory P. Brown, Thomas R.L. Madsen, Richard Shine, Thomas R. L. Madsen & Rick Shine
1. Broad phylogenetic patterns in sexual size dimorphism (SSD) are shaped by sex differences in net selection pressures (e.g., sexual selection, fecundity selection, survival selection), but environmental and ecological factors can also affect the expression of SSD. 2. Discussions of proximate ecological influences on SSD have focused on niche divergence; for example, increase in a prey type used by only one sex can elevate growth rates of that sex but not the other. Food limitation...

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