26 Works

Data from: Patterns of niche filling and expansion across the invaded ranges of an Australian lizard

Reid Tingley, Michael B. Thompson, Stephen Hartley & David G. Chapple
Studies of realized niche shifts in alien species typically ignore the potential effects of intraspecific niche variation and different invaded-range environments on niche lability. We incorporate our detailed knowledge of the native-range source populations and global introduction history of the delicate skink Lampropholis delicata to examine intraspecific variation in realized niche expansion and unfilling, and investigate how alternative niche modelling approaches are affected by that variation. We analyzed the realized niche dynamics of L. delicata...

Data from: Oxidant trade-offs in immunity: an experimental test in a lizard

Michael Tobler, Cissy Ballen, Mo Healey, Mark Wilson & Mats Olsson
Immune system functioning and maintenance entails costs which may limit investment into other processes such as reproduction. Yet, the proximate mechanisms and ‘currencies’ mediating the costs of immune responses remain elusive. In vertebrates, up-regulation of the innate immune system is associated with rapid phagocytic production of pro-oxidant molecules (so-called ‘oxidative burst’ responses). Oxidative burst responses are intended to eliminate pathogens but may also constitute an immunopathological risk as they may induce oxidative damage to self...

Data from: Lack of genetic diversity across diverse immune genes in an endangered mammal, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)

Katrina M. Morris, Belinda Wright, Catherine E. Grueber, Carolyn Hogg & Katherine Belov
The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is threatened with extinction due to the spread of devil facial tumour disease. Polymorphisms in immune genes can provide adaptive potential to resist diseases. Previous studies in diversity at immune loci in wild species have almost exclusively focused on genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, these genes only account for a fraction of immune gene diversity. Devils lack diversity at functionally important immunity loci, including MHC and Toll-like...

Data from: The contrasting phylodynamics of human influenza B viruses

Dhanasekaran Vijaykrishna, Edward C. Holmes, Udayan Joseph, Mathieu Fourment, Yvonne C. F. Su, Rebecca Halpin, Raphael T. C. Lee, Yi-Mo Deng, Vithiagaran Gunalan, Xudong Lin, Tim Stockwell, Nadia B. Fedorova, Bin Zhou, Natalie Spirason, Denise K. Kühnert, Veronika Bošková, Tanja Stadler, Anna-Maria Costa, Dominic E. Dwyer, Q. Sue Huang, Lance C. Jennings, William Rawlinson, Sheena G. Sullivan, Aeron C. Hurt, Sebastian Maurer-Stroh … & Raphael TC Lee
A complex interplay of viral, host and ecological factors shape the spatio-temporal incidence and evolution of human influenza viruses. Although considerable attention has been paid to influenza A viruses, a lack of equivalent data means that an integrated evolutionary and epidemiological framework has until now not been available for influenza B viruses, despite their significant disease burden. Through the analysis of over 900 full genomes from an epidemiological collection of more than 26,000 strains from...

Data from: Spatial variation in age structure among populations of a colonial marine snake: the influence of ectothermy

Xavier Bonnet, François Brischoux, David Pinaud, Richard Shine, Catherine Louise Michel, Jean Clobert & Thomas Fauvel
1. Several tetrapod lineages that have evolved to exploit marine environments (e.g. seals, seabirds, sea kraits) continue to rely upon land for reproduction and, thus, form dense colonies on suitable islands. 2. In birds and mammals (endotherms), the offspring cannot survive without their parents. Terrestrial colonies contain all age classes. In reptiles (ectotherms), this constraint is relaxed, because offspring are independent from birth. Hence, each age class has the potential to select sites with characteristics...

Data from: Initiation and spread of escape waves within animal groups

James E. Herbert-Read, Jerome Buhl, Feng Hu, Ashley J. W. Ward & David J. T. Sumpter
The exceptional reactivity of animal collectives to predatory attacks is thought to be owing to rapid, but local, transfer of information between group members. These groups turn together in unison and produce escape waves. However, it is not clear how escape waves are created from local interactions, nor is it understood how these patterns are shaped by natural selection. By startling schools of fish with a simulated attack in an experimental arena, we demonstrate that...

Data from: Differences in developmental strategies between long-settled and invasion-front populations of the cane toad in Australia

Simon Ducatez, Michael Crossland & Rick Shine
Phenotypic plasticity can enhance a species’ ability to persist in a new and stressful environment, so that reaction norms are expected to evolve as organisms encounter novel environments. Biological invasions provide a robust system to investigate such changes. We measured the rates of early growth and development in tadpoles of invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) in Australia, from a range of locations and at different larval densities. Populations in long-colonized areas have had the opportunity...

Data from: Unexpected positive and negative effects of continuing inbreeding in one of the world’s most inbred wild animals

Emily L. Weiser, Catherine E. Grueber, Euan S. Kennedy & Ian G. Jamieson
Inbreeding depression, the reduced fitness of offspring of related individuals, is a central theme in evolutionary biology. Inbreeding effects are influenced by the genetic makeup of a population, which is driven by any history of genetic bottlenecks and genetic drift. The Chatham Island black robin represents a case of extreme inbreeding following two severe population bottlenecks. We tested whether inbreeding measured by a 20-year pedigree predicted variation in fitness among individuals, despite the high mean...

Data from: Chemical suppression of embryonic cane toads Rhinella marina by larval conspecifics

Gregory S. Clarke, Michael R. Crossland, Cathy Shilton & Richard Shine
1. Mechanisms that evolved to suppress the development of potential competitors may offer novel methods for species-specific control of invasive organisms. The tadpoles of cane toads Rhinella marina compete for limited food resources in small ponds, and older tadpoles eliminate competitors not only by eating newly-laid eggs, but also by releasing a chemical that suppresses development of conspecific eggs. 2. We conducted laboratory trials to assess the magnitude and generality of this suppression effect, and...

Data from: Naiveté is not forever: responses of a vulnerable native rodent to its long term alien predators

Alexandra J. R. Carthey & Peter B. Banks
Alien predators have wreaked havoc on isolated endemic and island fauna worldwide, a phenomenon generally attributed to prey naiveté, or a failure to display effective antipredator behaviour due to a lack of experience. While the failure to recognise and/or respond to a novel predator has devastating impacts in the short term after predators are introduced, few studies have asked whether medium to long term experience with alien predators enables native species to overcome their naiveté....

Data from: Simulating regimes of chemical disturbance and testing impacts in the ecosystem using a novel programmable dosing system

Mark Anthony Browne, Paul R. Brooks, Robert Clough, Andrew S. Fisher, Mariana Mayer Pinto & Tasman P. Crowe
Pollution is a global issue at the frontier between ecology, environmental science, management, engineering and policy. Legislation requires experiments to determine how much contamination an ecosystem can absorb before there are structural or functional changes. Yet, existing methods cannot realistically simulate regimes of chemical disturbance and determine impacts to assemblages in ecosystems. This is because they lack ecologically relevant species and biotic interactions, are logistically difficult to set-up, and lack environmentally relevant regimes of chemical...

Data from: Prioritizing management actions for invasive populations using cost, efficacy, demography, and expert opinion for 14 plant species worldwide

Natalie Z. Kerr, Peter W. J. Baxter, Roberto Salguero-Gomez, Glenda M. Wardle, Yvonne M. Buckley & Peter W.J. Baxter
Management of invasive populations is typically investigated case-by-case. Comparative approaches have been applied to single aspects of management, such as demography, with cost or efficacy rarely incorporated. We present an analysis of the ranks of management actions for 14 species in five countries that extends beyond the use of demography alone to include multiple metrics for ranking management actions, which integrate cost, efficacy and demography (cost-effectiveness) and managers’ expert opinion of ranks. We use content...

Data from: Geographic and temporal dynamics of a global radiation and diversification in the killer whale

Phillip A. Morin, Kim M. Parsons, Frederick I. Archer, María C. Ávila-Arcos, Lance G. Barrett-Lennard, Luciano Dalla Rosa, Sebastián Duchêne, John W. Durban, Graeme M. Ellis, Steven H. Ferguson, John K. Ford, Michael J. Ford, Cristina Gabrilao, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Kristin Kaschner, Craig O. Matkin, Stephen D. Petersen, Kelly M. Robertson, Ingrid N. Visser, Paul R. Wade, Simon Y. W. Ho & Andrew D. Foote
Global climate change during the Late Pleistocene periodically encroached and then released habitat during the glacial cycles, causing range expansions and contractions in some species. These dynamics have played a major role in geographic radiations, diversification and speciation. We investigate these dynamics in the most widely distributed of marine mammals, the killer whale (Orcinus orca), using a global data set of over 450 samples. This marine top predator inhabits coastal and pelagic ecosystems ranging from...

Data from: Within-individual plasticity explains age-related decrease in stress response in a short-lived bird

Ádám Z. Lendvai, Mathieu Giraudeau, Veronika Bókony, Frédéric Angelier & Olivier Chastel
A crucial problem for every organism is how to allocate energy between competing life-history components. The optimal allocation decision is often state-dependent and mediated by hormones. Here, we investigated how age, a major state variable affects individuals' hormonal response to a standardized stressor: a trait that may reflect allocation between self-maintenance and reproduction. We caught free-living house sparrows and measured their hormonal (corticosterone) response to capture stress in consecutive years. Using a long-term ringing dataset,...

Data from: UV-B radiation interacts with temperature to determine animal performance

Ensiyeh Ghanizadeh Kazerouni, Craig E. Franklin & Frank Seebacher
The interaction between UV-B and temperature can modify the effects of climate variability on animal function because UV-B and increasing temperatures may increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and thereby impair animal performance. However, antioxidant enzyme activities are also increased at higher temperatures, which could counteract negative effects of increased ROS. Conversely, UV-B exposure at lower temperature can exacerbate the effects of ROS because of lower antioxidant enzyme activities. Phenotypes can be plastic to compensate...

Data from: Dissemination, divergence and establishment of H7N9 influenza viruses in China

Tommy Tsan-Yuk Lam, Boping Zhou, Jia Wang, Yujuan Chai, Yongyi Shen, Xinchun Chen, Chi Ma, Wenshan Hong, Yin Chen, Yanjun Zhang, Lian Duan, Peiwen Chen, Junfei Jiang, Yu Zhang, Lifeng Li, Leo Lit Man Poon, Richard J. Webby, David K. Smith, Gabriel M. Leung, Joseph S. M. Peiris, Edward C. Holmes, Yi Guan & Huachen Zhu
Since 2013 the occurrence of human infections by a novel avian H7N9 influenza virus in China has demonstrated the continuing threat posed by zoonotic pathogens. Although the first outbreak wave that was centred on eastern China was seemingly averted, human infections recurred in October 2013. It is unclear how the H7N9 virus re-emerged and how it will develop further; potentially it may become a long-term threat to public health. Here we show that H7N9 viruses...

Data from: Assessing spatio-temporal priorities for species’ recovery in broad-scale dynamic landscapes

Truly Santika, Clive A. McAlpine, Daniel Lunney, Kerrie A. Wilson & Jonathan R. Rhodes
1. As threats to biodiversity from environmental change increase, assessing priorities for mitigation action becomes increasingly important. However, there have been few attempts to schedule actions across broad spatial extents that explicitly account for dynamic ecological processes and threats. 2. We combined a dynamic occupancy model with a decision analysis framework to spatially allocate multiple recovery actions to maximize species’ probability of occupancy under threats posed by climate and land-use change. We used the koala...

Data from: Functional implications of omnivory for dietary nutrient balance

Luigi Remonti, Alessandro Balestrieri, David Raubenheimer & Nicola Saino
Captive experiments have shown that many species regulate their macronutrient (i.e. protein, lipid and carbohydrate) intake by selecting complementary food types, but the relationships between foraging strategies in the wild and nutrient regulation remain poorly understood. Using the pine marten as a model species, we collated available data from the literature to investigate effects of seasonal and geographic variation in diet on dietary macronutrient balance. Our analysis showed that despite a high variety of foods...

Data from: Ecological immunization: In situ training of free-ranging predatory lizards reduces their vulnerability to invasive toxic prey

Georgia Ward-Fear, David J. Pearson, Gregory P. Brown, Balanggarra Rangers & Richard Shine
In Australia, large native predators are fatally poisoned when they ingest invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina). As a result, the spread of cane toads has caused catastrophic population declines in these predators. Immediately prior to the arrival of toads at a floodplain in the Kimberley region, we induced conditioned taste aversion in free-ranging varanid lizards (Varanus panoptes), by offering them small cane toads. By the end of the 18-month study, only one of 31 untrained...

Data from: Life in the unthinking depths: energetic constraints on encephalization in marine fishes

Teresa L. Iglesias, Alex Dornburg, Matthew C. Brandley, Michael E. Alfaro & Dan L. Warren
Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the limitation of brain size in vertebrates. Here we test three hypotheses of brain size evolution using marine teleost fishes: the direct metabolic constraints hypothesis, the expensive tissue hypothesis, and the temperature-dependent hypothesis. Our analyses indicate that there is a robust positive correlation between encephalization and basal metabolic rate that spans the full range of depths occupied by teleosts from the epipelagic (< 200m), mesopelagic (200-1000m), and bathypelagic...

Data from: A genetic perspective on rapid evolution in cane toads (Rhinella marina)

Lee Ann Rollins, Mark F. Richardson & Richard Shine
The process of biological invasion exposes a species to novel pressures, in terms of both the environments it encounters and the evolutionary consequences of range expansion. Several invaders have been shown to exhibit rapid evolutionary changes in response to those pressures, thus providing robust opportunities to clarify the processes at work during rapid phenotypic transitions. The accelerating pace of invasion of cane toads (Rhinella marina) in tropical Australia during its 80-year history has been well...

Data from: Kinetic estimation of GFR improves prediction of dialysis and recovery after kidney transplantation

Timothy J. Pianta, Zoltan H. Endre, John W. Pickering, Nicholas A. Buckley & Philip W. Peake
Background: The early prediction of delayed graft function (DGF) would facilitate patient management after kidney transplantation. Methods: In a single-centre retrospective analysis, we investigated kinetic estimated GFR under non-steady-state conditions, KeGFR, in prediction of DGF. KeGFRsCr was calculated at 4h, 8h and 12h in 56 recipients of deceased donor kidneys from initial serum creatinine (sCr) concentrations, estimated creatinine production rate, volume of distribution, and the difference between consecutive sCr values. The utility of KeGFRsCr for...

Data from: Vocalisations of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the Bremer Canyon, Western Australia

Rebecca Wellard, Christine Erbe, Leila Fouda & Michelle Blewitt
To date, there has been no dedicated study in Australian waters on the acoustics of killer whales. Hence no information has been published on the sounds produced by killer whales from this region. Here we present the first acoustical analysis of recordings collected off the Western Australian coast. Underwater sounds produced by Australian killer whales were recorded during the months of February and March 2014 and 2015 in the Bremer Canyon in Western Australia. Vocalisations...

Data from: Subordinate plants mitigate drought effects on soil ecosystem processes by stimulating fungi

Pierre Mariotte, Bjorn J. M. Robroek, Vincent E. J. Jassey & Alexandre Buttler
The subordinate insurance hypothesis suggests that highly diverse communities contain greater numbers of subordinate species than less diverse communities. It has previously been reported that subordinate species can improve grassland productivity during drought, but the underlying mechanisms remain undetermined. Using a combination of subordinate species removal and summer drought, we show that soil processes play a critical role in community resistance to drought. Interestingly, subordinate species drive soil microbial community structure and largely mitigate the...

Data from: NetView P: a network visualization tool to unravel complex population structure using genome-wide SNPs

Eike J. Steinig, Markus Neuditschko, Mehar S. Khatkar, Herman W. Raadsma & Kyall R. Zenger
Network-based approaches are emerging as valuable tools for the analysis of complex genetic structure in both wild and captive populations. NetView P combines data quality control with the construction of population networks based on mutual k-nearest-neighbours thresholds applied to genome-wide SNPs. The program is cross-platform compatible, open-source and efficiently operates on data ranging from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of SNPs through multiprocessing in Python. We used the pipeline for the analysis of pedigree data...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    26

Affiliations

  • University of Sydney
    26
  • University of Queensland
    3
  • University of Melbourne
    3
  • Monash University
    3
  • University of Otago
    2
  • Macquarie University
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Curtin University
    2
  • UNSW Sydney
    2
  • Uppsala University
    2