39 Works

Data from: Survival of the feces: does a nematode lungworm adaptively manipulate the behavior of its cane toad host?

Patrick B. Finnerty, Richard Shine & Gregory P. Brown
Parasites can enhance their fitness by modifying the behavior of their hosts in ways that increase rates of production and transmission of parasite larvae. We used an antihelminthic drug to experimentally alter infections of lungworms (Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala) in cane toads (Rhinella marina). We then compared subsequent behaviors of dewormed toads versus toads that retained infections. Both in the laboratory and in the field, the presence of parasites induced hosts to select higher body temperatures (thereby...

Data from: Impacts of ocean acidification on sea urchin growth across the juvenile to mature adult life-stage transition is mitigated by warming

Symon A. Dworjanyn & Maria Byrne
Understanding how growth trajectories of calcifying invertebrates are affected by changing climate requires acclimation experiments that follow development across life history transitions. In a long-term acclimation study, the effects of increased acidification and temperature on survival and growth of the tropical sea urchin Tripneustes gratilla from the early juvenile (5 mm test diameter- TD) through the developmental transition to the mature adult (60 mm TD) were investigated. Juveniles were reared in a combination of three...

Data from: Nutrient-specific compensation for seasonal cold stress in a free-ranging temperate colobine monkey

Songtao Guo, Rong Hou, Paul A. Garber, David Raubenheimer, Nicoletta Righini, Weihong Ji, Ollie Jay, Shujun He, Fan Wu, Fangfang Li, Baoguo Li, Song-Tao Guo, Shu-Jun He, Fang-Fang Li, Bao-Guo Li & Wei-Hong Ji
1. Homeostatic responses of animals to environmentally-induced changes in nutrient requirements provide a powerful basis for predictive ecological models, and yet such responses are virtually unstudied in the wild. 2. We tested for macronutrient-specific compensatory feeding responses by free-ranging golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) inhabiting high altitude temperate forests where they experience a substantial difference in ambient temperature in cold winters vs. warmer springs. The monkeys had free access to natural foods throughout the year,...

Data from: Unravelling species boundaries in the Aspergillus viridinutans complex (section Fumigati): opportunistic human and animal pathogens capable of interspecific hybridization

Vit Hubka, Vanessa Barrs, Zuzana Dudová, František Sklenář, Alena Kubátová, Tetsuhiro Matsuzawa, Takashi Yaguchi, Yoshikazu Horie, Alena Nováková, Jens C. Frisvad, Jessica Talbot & Miroslav Kolařík
Although Aspergillus fumigatus is the major agent of invasive aspergillosis, an increasing number of infections are caused by its cryptic species, especially A. lentulus and the A. viridinutans species complex (AVSC). Their identification is clinically relevant because of antifungal drug resistance and refractory infections. Species boundaries in the AVSC are unresolved since most species have uniform morphology and produce interspecific hybrids in vitro. Clinical and environmental strains from six continents (n = 110) were characterized...

Data from: Genomic comparisons reveal biogeographic and anthropogenic impacts in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus); a dietary-specialist species distributed across heterogeneous environments

Shannon R. Kjeldsen, Herman W. Raadsma, Kellie A. Leigh, Jennifer R. Tobey, David Phalen, Andrew Krockenberger, William A. Ellis, Emily Hynes, Damien P. Higgins & Kyall R. Zenger
The Australian koala is an iconic marsupial with specific dietary requirements distributed across heterogeneous environments, over a large geographic range. The distribution and genetic structure of koala populations has been heavily influenced by human actions, specifically habitat modification, hunting and translocation of koalas. There is currently limited information on population diversity and gene-flow at a species-wide scale, or with consideration to the potential impacts of local adaptation. Using species-wide sampling across heterogeneous environments, and high-density...

Data from: Petrol exhaust pollution impairs honey bee learning and memory

Ryan J. Leonard, Vanina Vergoz, Nicholas Proschogo, Clare McArthur & Dieter F. Hochuli
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) serve as important infochemicals, mediating several ecological interactions including herbivory and pollination. Atmospheric pollutants including traffic-related air pollution may impair the detection of VOCs used by insects in insect-plant interactions. We investigated the indirect effect of petrol exhaust pollution on olfactory learning and memory (short and long term) in honey bees. Using appetitive olfactory conditioning, we trained bees to learn one of four floral VOC profiles; linalool, dipentene, myrcene and geranium....

Data from: Long term effects of superoxide and DNA repair on lizard telomeres

Mats Olsson, Christopher R. Friesen, Nicky Rollings, Joanna Sudyka, Willow Lindsay, Camilla M. Whittington & Mark Wilson
Telomeres are the non-coding protein-nucleotide ‘caps’ at chromosome ends that contribute to chromosomal stability by protecting the coding parts of the linear DNA from shortening at cell division, and from erosion by reactive molecules. Recently, there has been some controversy between molecular and cell biologists, on the one hand, and evolutionary ecologists on the other, regarding whether reactive molecules erode telomeres during oxidative stress. Many studies of biochemistry and medicine have verified these relationships in...

Data from: Comparison of methods for molecular species delimitation across a range of speciation scenarios

Arong Luo, Cheng Ling, Simon Y.W. Ho, Chao-Dong Zhu & Simon Y W Ho
Species are fundamental units in biological research and can be defined on the basis of various operational criteria. There has been growing use of molecular approaches for species delimitation. Among the most widely used methods, the generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) and Poisson tree processes (PTP) were designed for the analysis of single-locus data but are often applied to concatenations of multilocus data. In contrast, the Bayesian multispecies coalescent approach in the software BPP explicitly models...

Data from: True recognition of nestlings by hosts selects for mimetic cuckoo chicks

Hee-Jin Noh, Ros Gloag & Naomi E. Langmore
Cuckoos lay their eggs in other birds’ nests, whereafter the young cuckoo hatches, ejects its nestmates, and monopolizes the care of the host parents. Theory predicts that hosts should not evolve to recognize and reject cuckoo chicks because of the risk of mistakenly imprinting on a cuckoo chick in their first brood and thereafter always rejecting their own chicks. However, recent studies have revealed some hosts do reject cuckoo chicks from the nest, indicating that...

Data from: Resting-state gamma-band power alterations in schizophrenia reveal E/I-balance abnormalities across illness-stages

Tineke Grent-'T-Jong, Joachim Gross, Jozien Goense, Michael Wibral, Ruchika Gajwani, Andrew I. Gumley, Stephen M. Lawrie, Matthias Schwannauer, Frauke Schultze-Lutter, Tobias Navarro Schröder, Dagmar Koethe, F. Markus Leweke, Wolf Singer & Peter J. Uhlhaas
We examined alterations in E/I-balance in schizophrenia (ScZ) through measurements of resting-state gamma-band activity in participants meeting clinical high-risk (CHR) criteria (n = 88), 21 first episode (FEP) patients and 34 chronic ScZ-patients. Furthermore, MRS-data were obtained in CHR-participants and matched controls. Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) resting-state activity was examined at source level and MEG-data were correlated with neuropsychological scores and clinical symptoms. CHR-participants were characterized by increased 64–90 Hz power. In contrast, FEP- and ScZ-patients showed...

Data from: Behavioural tactics used by invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) to exploit apiaries in Australia

Renee Silvester, Matthew Greenlees, Richard Shine & Benjamin Oldroyd
Behavioural flexibility plays a key role in facilitating the ability of invasive species to exploit anthropogenically-created resources. In Australia, invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) often gather around commercial beehives (apiaries), whereas native frogs do not. To document how toads use this resource, we spool-tracked cane toads in areas containing beehives and in adjacent natural habitat without beehives, conducted standardized observations of toad feeding behaviour, and ran prey-manipulation trials to compare the responses of cane toads...

Data from: Australian native mammals recognise and respond to alien predators: a meta-analysis

Peter B. Banks, Alexandra J. R. Carthey & Jenna P. Bytheway
Prey naiveté is a failure to recognise novel predators and thought to cause exaggerated impacts of alien predators on native wildlife. Yet there is equivocal evidence in the literature for native prey naiveté towards aliens. To address this, we conducted a meta-analysis of Australian mammal responses to native and alien predators. Australia has the world’s worst record of extinction and declines of native mammals, largely due to two alien predators introduced some 150 years ago:...

Data from: Synchronous diversification of Sulawesi's iconic artiodactyls driven by recent geological events

Laurent A. F. Frantz, Anna Rudzinski, Abang Mansyursyah Surya Nugraha, Allowen Evin, James Burton, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Anna Linderholm, Ross Barnett, Rodrigo Vega, Evan K. Irving-Pease, James Haile, Richard Allen, Kristin Leus, Jill Shephard, Mia Hillyer, Sarah Gillemot, Jeroen Van Den Hurk, Sharron Ogle, Cristina Atofanei, Mark G. Thomas, Friederike Johansson, Abdul Haris Mustari, John Williams, Kusdiantoro Mohamad, Chandramaya Siska Damayanti … & Greger Larson
The high degree of endemism on Sulawesi has previously been suggested to have vicariant origins, dating back 40 Myr ago. Recent studies, however, suggest that much of Sulawesi’s fauna assembled over the last 15 Myr. Here, we test the hypothesis that more recent uplift of previously submerged portions of land on Sulawesi promoted diversification, and that much of its faunal assemblage is much younger than the island itself. To do so, we combined palaeogeographical reconstructions...

Data from: Glutamate receptor delta2 serum antibodies in paediatric opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome

Georgina Berridge, David A Menassa, Teresa Moloney, Patrick J Waters, Imogen Welding, Selina Thomsen, Sameer Zuberi, Roman Fischer, A. Radu Aricescu, Michael Pike, Russell C Dale, Benedikt Kessler, Angela Vincent, Ming Lim, Sarosh R Irani & Bethan Lang
Objective: To identify neuronal surface antibodies in opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome (OMAS) usingcontemporary antigen discovery methodology. Methods: OMAS patient serum IgG immunohistochemistry using age-equivalent rat cerebellar tissue was followed by immunoprecipitation, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Data are available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD009578). This generated a list of potential neuronal surface cerebellar autoantigens. Live cell-based assays (CBA) were used to confirm membrane-surface antigens and adsorb antigen-specific IgGs. The serological results were compared to the clinical...

Data from: Phylodynamic model adequacy using posterior predictive simulations

Sebastian Duchene, Remco Bouckaert, David A Duchene, Tanja Stadler & Alexei J Drummond
Rapidly evolving pathogens, such as viruses and bacteria, accumulate genetic change at a similar timescale over which their epidemiological processes occur, such that it is possible to make inferences about their infectious spread using phylogenetic time-trees. For this purpose it is necessary to choose a phylodynamic model. However, the resulting inferences are contingent on whether the model adequately describes key features of the data. Model adequacy methods allow formal rejection of a model if it...

Data from: Crop rotational diversity enhances belowground communities and functions in an agroecosystem

L. K. Tiemann, A. S. Grandy, E. E. Atkinson, E. Marin-Spiotta & M. D. McDaniel
Biodiversity loss, an important consequence of agricultural intensification, can lead to reductions in agroecosystem functions and services. Increasing crop diversity through rotation may alleviate these negative consequences by restoring positive aboveground–belowground interactions. Positive impacts of aboveground biodiversity on belowground communities and processes have primarily been observed in natural systems. Here, we test for the effects of increased diversity in an agroecosystem, where plant diversity is increased over time through crop rotation. As crop diversity increased...

Data from: The thermal dependency of locomotor performance evolves rapidly within an invasive species

Georgia K. Kosmala, Gregory P. Brown, Keith A. Christian, Cameron M. Hudson & Richard Shine
Biological invasions can stimulate rapid shifts in organismal performance, via both plasticity and adaptation. We can distinguish between these two proximate mechanisms by rearing offspring from populations under identical conditions, and measuring their locomotor abilities in standardized trials. We collected adult cane toads (Rhinella marina) from invasive populations that inhabit regions of Australia with different climatic conditions. We bred those toads, and raised their offspring under common-garden conditions before testing their locomotor performance. At high...

Data from: Pupillometry reveals perceptual differences that are tightly linked to autistic traits in typical adults

Marco Turi, David Charles Burr & Paola Binda
The pupil is primarily regulated by prevailing light levels, but is also modulated by perceptual and attentional factors. We measured pupil-size in typical adult humans viewing a bistable-rotating cylinder, constructed so the luminance of the front surface changes with perceived direction of rotation. In some participants, pupil diameter oscillated in phase with the ambiguous perception, more dilated when the black surface was in front. Importantly, the magnitude of oscillation predicts autistic traits of participants, assessed...

Data from: Invasion history alters the behavioural consequences of immune system activation in cane toads.

Gregory P. Brown, Damian Holden, Richard Shine & Ben L. Phillips
1. Acute activation of the immune system often initiates a suite of behavioural changes. These ‘sickness behaviours’—involving lethargy and decreased activity—may be particularly costly on invasion fronts, where evolutionary pressures on dispersal favour individuals that move large distances. 2. We used a combination of field and laboratory studies to compare sickness behaviours of cane toads from populations differing in invasion history. To do this we stimulated immune system activation by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic...

Data from: Litter carbon and nutrient chemistry control the magnitude of soil priming effect

Lin Chao, Yanyan Liu, Grégoire Freschet, Weidong Zhang, Xin Yu, Wenhui Zheng, Xin Guan, Qingpeng Yang, Longchi Chen, Feike Dijkstra, Silong Wang & Feike A. Dijkstra
1. Plant litter inputs can promote the decomposition of soil organic matter (OM) through the priming effect (PE). However, whereas leaf litter chemistry has long been identified as the primary driver of litter decomposition within biomes worldwide, little is known about how litter chemical traits influence the occurrence and strength of the PE. 2. Here, we studied the effects of 15 co-occurring C3 leaf litters of contrasting chemistry on C4 soil respiration by analyzing changes...

Data from: Inbreeding tolerance as a pre-adapted trait for invasion success in the invasive ant Brachyponera chinensis

Pierre-André Eyer, Kenji Matsuura, Edward Vargo, Kazuya Kobayashi, Toshihisa Yashiro, Wataru Suehiro, Chihiro Himuro, Tomoyuki Yokoi, Benoit Guénard, Robert R. Dunn, Kazuki Tsuji, Pierre‐André Eyer & Edward L. Vargo
Identifying traits that facilitate species introductions and successful invasions of ecosystems represents a key issue in ecology. Following their establishment into new environments, many non-native species exhibit phenotypic plasticity with post-introduction changes in behavior, morphology or life history traits that allow them to overcome the presumed loss of genetic diversity resulting in inbreeding and reduced adaptive potential. Here we present a unique strategy in the invasive ant Brachyponera chinensis (Emery), in which inbreeding tolerance is...

Data from: Cultural flies: conformist social learning in fruit flies predicts long-lasting mate-choice traditions

Etienne Danchin, Sabine Nöbel, Arnaud Pocheville, Anne-Cecile Dagaeff, Léa Demay, Mathilde Alphand, Sarah Ranty-Roby, Lara Van Renssen, Magdalena Monier, Eva Gazagne, Mélanie Allain & Guillaume Isabel
Despite theoretical justification for the evolution of animal culture, there is still scant empirical evidence for it beyond mammals and birds, and we still know little about the process of cultural inheritance. Here, we propose a mechanism-driven definition of animal culture and test it in the fruit fly. We found that fruit flies have five cognitive capacities that enable them to transmit mating preferences culturally across generations, potentially fostering persistent traditions (the main marker of...

Data from: Nutrition in extreme food specialists: an illustration using termites

Laure-Anne Poissonnier, Sara Arganda, Stephen J. Simpson, Audrey Dussutour & Jerome Buhl
1. Recent nutritional ecology theories predict that an organism feeding on a single, highly predictable food should lack the typical active regulation of nutrient balance observed in all other organisms studied so far. It could instead limit itself to controlling the amount of food eaten alone. Such an animal would however be strongly affected by nutrient imbalances. 2. Termites are an ideal model animal to test those predictions. 3. We investigated how the nutritional content...

Data from: Clinical correlation between erectile function and ejaculatory function in the Czech male population

Watcharaphol Alexandre Kamnerdsiri, Jesús Eugenio Rodríguez Martinez, Christopher Fox & Petr Weiss
Introduction The objective of this study is to determine whether there is any relationship between erectile function (EF) and ejaculatory function (EJF), with the aim of improving care protocols in the clinical practice. Materials and methods A total of 1004 Czech males between 15 and 84 years (42.77 ± 17.556 years) completed a sexual behavior questionnaire. A correlational, between-subjects design was used, where a 5-item abbreviated form of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5)...

Data from: Effects of aging on timing of hibernation and reproduction

Claudia Bieber, Christopher Turbill & Thomas Ruf
Small hibernators are long-lived for their size because seasonal dormancy greatly reduces predation risk. Thus, within a year, hibernators switch between states of contrasting mortality risk (active season versus hibernation), making them interesting species for testing the predictions of life-history theory. Accordingly, we hypothesized that, with advancing age and hence diminishing reproductive potential, hibernators should increasingly accept the higher predation risk associated with activity to increase the likelihood of current reproductive success. For edible dormice...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    39

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    39

Affiliations

  • University of Sydney
    39
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • University of Wollongong
    2
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • University of Glasgow
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • University of California, Berkeley
    2
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • Texas A&M University
    2