7 Works

Data from: A new subfamily classification of the Leguminosae based on a taxonomically comprehensive phylogeny

, Anne Bruneau, Nasim Azani, Marielle Babineau, Edeline Gagnon, Carole Sinou, Royce Steeves, Erin Zimmerman, C. Donovan Bailey, Lynsey Kovar, Madhugiri Nageswara-Rao, Hannah Banks, RuthP. Clark, Manuel De La Estrella, Peter Gasson, GeoffreyC. Kite, BenteB. Klitgaard, GwilymP. Lewis, Danilo Neves, Gerhard Prenner, María De Lourdes Rico-Arce, ArianeR. Barbosa, Maria Cristina López-Roberts, Luciano Paganucci De Queiroz, PétalaG. Ribeiro … & Tingshuang Yi
The classification of the legume family proposed here addresses the long-known non-monophyly of the traditionally recognised subfamily Caesalpinioideae, by recognising six robustly supported monophyletic subfamilies. This new classification uses as its framework the most comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of legumes to date, based on plastid matK gene sequences, and including near-complete sampling of genera (698 of the currently recognised 765 genera) and ca. 20% (3696) of known species. The matK gene region has been the most...

Data from: Intracontinental plant invader shows matching genetic and chemical profiles and might benefit from high defence variation within populations

Lisa Johanna Tewes, Florian Michling, Marcus A. Koch & Caroline Müller
1. Whereas many studies have revealed mechanisms driving plant invasions between continents, research on intracontinental range-expanders is scarce. Therefore, we studied genetic, chemical and ecological traits of a range-expanding Brassicaceae, assuming that high genetic diversity should maintain chemical variation, which potentially benefits the invasion success. Moreover, we expected that within-individual defence diversity plays an essential role in biotic interactions. 2. We compared Bunias orientalis plants from 16 populations of native, invasive or exotic non-invasive origin....

Data from: Monophyletic origin and evolution of the largest crucifer genomes

Terezie Mandáková, Petra Hloušková, Dmitry A. German & Martin A. Lysak
Clade E, or the Hesperis-clade is one of the major Brassicaceae (Crucifereae) clades comprising some 48 genera and 351 species classified into seven tribes and is predominantly distributed across arid and montane regions of Asia. Several taxa have socio-economic significance, being important ornamental but also weedy and invasive species. From the comparative genomic perspective, the clade is noteworthy as it harbors species with the largest crucifer genomes but low numbers of chromosomes (n = 5...

Data from: Molecular resources from transcriptomes in the Brassicaceae family

Lua Lopez, Eva M. Wolf, J. Chris Pires, Patrick P. Edger & Marcus A. Koch
The rapidly falling costs and the increasing availability of large DNA sequence data sets facilitate the fast and affordable mining of large molecular markers data sets for comprehensive evolutionary studies. The Brassicaceae (mustards) are an important species-rich family in the plant kingdom with taxa distributed worldwide and a complex evolutionary history. We performed Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) mining using de novo assembled transcriptomes from 19 species across the Brassicaceae in order to study SSR evolution...

Data from: How weather instead of urbanity measures affects song trait variability in three European passerine bird species

Julia E. Schäfer, Marcel M. Janocha, Sebastian Klaus & Dieter Thomas Tietze
Previous studies detected an influence of urban characteristics on song traits in passerine birds, that is, song adjustments to ambient noise in urban areas. Several studies already described the effect of weather conditions on the behavior of birds, but not the effect on song traits. We investigate, if song trait variability changes along a continuous urbanity gradient in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. We examined, for the first time on a larger scale, the influence of...

Data from: Sex differentiation in grayling (Salmonidae) goes through an all-male stage and is delayed in genetic males who instead grow faster

Diane Maitre, Oliver M. Selmoni, Anshu Uppal, Lucas Marques Da Cunha, Laetitia G. E. Wilkins, Julien Roux, Kenyon B. Mobley, Isabelle Castro, Susanne Knörr, Marc Robinson-Rechavi & Claus Wedekind
Fish populations can be threatened by distorted sex ratios that arise during sex differentiation. Here we describe sex differentiation in a wild grayling (Thymallus thymallus) population that suffers from distorted sex ratios. We verified that sex determination is linked to the sex determining locus (sdY) of salmonids. This allowed us to study sex-specific gene expression and gonadal development. Sex-specific gene expression could be observed during embryogenesis and was strong around hatching. About half of the...

Data from: Are the radiations of temperate lineages in tropical alpine ecosystems pre-adapted?

Nicolai M. Nürk, Florian Michling & Hans Peter Linder
Aim: Tropical mountains around the world harbour an extraordinarily rich pool of plant species and are hotspots of biodiversity. Climatically, they can be zoned into montane climates at mid-altitudes and tropical alpine climates above the tree line. Around half of the tropical alpine species belong to plant lineages with a temperate ancestry, although these regions are often geographically distant. We test the hypothesis that these temperate lineages are pre-adapted to the tropical alpine climate. Location:...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Heidelberg University
    7
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1
  • University of the Western Cape
    1
  • New Mexico State University
    1
  • Kyushu University
    1
  • Federal University of São Carlos
    1
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    1
  • Universidade do Estado da Bahia
    1