6 Works

Data from: Sequence co-evolution gives 3D contacts and structures of protein complexes

Thomas A. Hopf, Charlotta P. I. Schärfe, João P. G. L. M. Rodrigues, Anna G. Green, Chris Sander, Alexandre M. J. J. Bonvin, Debora S. Marks & Oliver Kohlbacher
Protein-protein interactions are fundamental to many biological processes. Experimental screens have identified tens of thousands of interactions and structural biology has provided detailed functional insight for select 3D protein complexes. An alternative rich source of information about protein interactions is the evolutionary sequence record. Building on earlier work, we show that analysis of correlated evolutionary sequence changes across proteins identifies residues that are close in space with sufficient accuracy to determine the three-dimensional structure of...

Data from: Human-facilitated metapopulation dynamics in an emerging pest species, Cimex lectularius

Toby Fountain, Gavin Horsburgh, Ludovic Duvaux, Klaus Reinhardt & Roger K. Butlin
The number and demographic history of colonists can have dramatic consequences for the way in which genetic diversity is distributed and maintained in a metapopulation. The bed bug (Cimex lectularius) is a re-emerging pest species whose close association with humans has led to frequent local extinction and colonisation, i.e. to metapopulation dynamics. Pest control limits the lifespan of sub-populations, causing frequent local extinctions, and human-facilitated dispersal allows the colonisation of empty patches. Founder events often...

Data from: Outbreeding effects in an inbreeding insect, Cimex lectularius

Toby Fountain, Roger K. Butlin, Klaus Reinhardt & Oliver Otti
In some species, populations with few founding individuals can be resilient to extreme inbreeding. Inbreeding seems to be the norm in the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, a flightless insect that, nevertheless, can reach large deme sizes and persist successfully. However, bed bugs can also be dispersed passively by humans, exposing inbred populations to gene flow from genetically distant populations. The introduction of genetic variation through this outbreeding could lead to increased fitness (heterosis) or...

Data from: A meta-analysis of the strength and nature of cytoplasmic genetic effects

Ralph Dobler, Björn Rogell, Françoise Budar & Damian K. Dowling
Genetic variation in cytoplasmic genomes (i.e. the mitochondrial genome in animals, and the combined mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes in plants) was traditionally assumed to accumulate under a neutral equilibrium model. This view has, however, come under increasing challenge from studies that have experimentally linked cytoplasmic genetic effects to the expression of life history phenotypes. Such results suggest that genetic variance located within the cytoplasm might be of evolutionary importance and potentially involved in shaping population...

Data from: Small-scale patterns in snowmelt timing affect gene flow and the distribution of genetic diversity in the alpine dwarf shrub Salix herbacea

Andrés J. Cortés, Stephan Waeber, Christian Lexer, Janosch Sedlacek, Julia A. Wheeler, Mark Van Kleunen, Oliver Bossdorf, Günter Hoch, Christian Rixen, Sonja Wipf & Sophie Karrenberg
Current threats to biodiversity, such as climate change, are thought to alter the within-species genetic diversity among microhabitats in highly heterogeneous alpine environments. Assessing the spatial organization and dynamics of genetic diversity within species can help to predict the responses of organisms to environmental change. In this study, we evaluated whether small-scale heterogeneity in snowmelt timing restricts gene flow between microhabitats in the common long-lived dwarf shrub Salix herbacea L. We surveyed 273 genets across...

Data from: The outcome of shared pollination services is affected by the density and spatial pattern of an attractive neighbour

Merav Seifan, Eva-Maria Hoch, Sven Hanoteaux & Katja Tielbörger
Interactions among neighbouring plants are often mediated by foraging choices of pollinators. For example, the presence of a conspicuous species may increase the number of pollinators attracted to its vicinity, indirectly increasing visitation rates also to neighbouring plants. Because pollinator choices are frequently density dependent, the presence of a conspicuous species at high densities may also increase competition for pollination services. Additionally, models predict that plant density will interact with spatial distribution in manipulating the...

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  • University of Tübingen
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