12 Works

Data from: Functional niche partitioning in Therizinosauria provides new insights into the evolution of theropod herbivory

Stephan Lautenschlager
Dietary specialization is generally considered to be a crucial factor in driving morphological evolution across extant and extinct vertebrates. The ability to adapt to a specific diet and to exploit ecological niches is thereby influenced by functional morphology and biomechanical properties. Differences in functional behaviour and efficiency can therefore allow dietary diversification and the coexistence of similarly adapted taxa. Therizinosauria, a group of secondarily herbivorous theropod dinosaurs, is characterized by a suite of morphological traits...

Data from: NOS: a software suite to compute node overlap and segregation in ecological networks

Giovanni Strona, Thomas Joseph Matthews, Susanne Kortsch & Joseph A. Veech
Investigating the structure of ecological networks can help unravel the mechanisms promoting and maintaining biodiversity. Recently, Strona and Veech (10.1111/2041-210X.12395) introduced a new metric (Ɲ ̅, pronounced ‘nos’), that allows assessment of structural patterns in networks ranging from complete node segregation to perfect nestedness, and that also provides a visual and quantitative assessment of the degree of network modularity. The Ɲ ̅ metric permits testing of a wide range of hypotheses regarding the tendency for...

Data from: Founder effects determine the genetic structure of the water flea Daphnia in Ethiopian reservoirs

Tsegazeabe Hadush Haileselasie, Joachim Mergeay, Joost Vanoverbeke, Luisa Orsini & Luc De Meester
Founder effects introduce stochasticity in the genetic structure of species at the regional scale. To the extent that founder effects are important, they will result in a reduced signature of space, time, and environmental variation in landscape genetic data. We studied the metapopulation genetic structure of recently founded populations of the microcrustacean Daphnia sinensis in 10 Ethiopian water reservoirs. We used three different approaches to estimate the number of effective founders and applied them to...

Data from: Thermal tolerance in the keystone species Daphnia magna –a candidate gene and an outlier analysis approach

Mieke Jansen, Aurora N. Geerts, Alfredo Rago, Katina I. Spanier, Carla Denis, Luc De Meester & Luisa Orsini
Changes in temperature have occurred throughout Earth’s history. However, current warming trends exacerbated by human activities impose severe and rapid loss of biodiversity. Although understanding the mechanisms orchestrating organismal response to climate change is important, remarkably few studies document their role in nature. This is because only few systems enable the combined analysis of genetic and plastic responses to environmental change over long time-spans. Here, we characterize genetic and plastic responses to temperature increase in...

Data from: Development of visual cortical function in infant macaques: a BOLD fMRI study

Tom Van Grootel, Alan Meeson, Matthias H.J. Munk, Zoe Kourtzi, J. Anthony Movshon, Nikos K. Logothetis, Lynne Kiorpes & Tom J. Van Grootel
Functional brain development is not well understood. In the visual system, neurophysiological studies in nonhuman primates show quite mature neuronal properties near birth although visual function is itself quite immature and continues to develop over many months or years after birth. Our goal was to assess the relative development of two main visual processing streams, dorsal and ventral, using BOLD fMRI in an attempt to understand the global mechanisms that support the maturation of visual...

Data from: Harnessing stratigraphic bias at the section scale: conodont diversity in the Homerian (Silurian) of the Midland Platform, England

Emilia Jarochowska, David C. Ray, Philipp Röstel, Graham Worton & Axel Munnecke
Fossil abundance and diversity in geological successions are subject to bias arising from shifting depositional and diagenetic environments, resulting in variable rates of fossil accumulation and preservation. In simulations, this bias can be constrained based on sequence-stratigraphic architecture. Nonetheless, a practical quantitative method of incorporating the contribution of sequence-stratigraphic architecture in community palaeoecology and diversity analyses derived from individual successions is missing. As a model of faunal turnover affected by the stratigraphic bias, we use...

Data from: The earliest bird-line archosaurs and the assembly of the dinosaur body plan

Sterling J. Nesbitt, Richard J. Butler, Martin D. Ezcurra, Paul M. Barrett, Michelle R. Stocker, Kenneth D. Angielczyk, Roger M. H. Smith, Christian A. Sidor, Grzegorz Niedźwiedzki, Andrey G. Sennikov & Alan J. Charig
The relationship between dinosaurs and other reptiles is well established, but the sequence of acquisition of dinosaurian features has been obscured by the scarcity of fossils with transitional morphologies. The closest extinct relatives of dinosaurs either have highly derived morphologies or are known from poorly preserved or incomplete material. Here we describe one of the stratigraphically lowest and phylogenetically earliest members of the avian stem lineage (Avemetatarsalia), Teleocrater rhadinus gen. et sp. nov., from the...

Data from: Dynamics of cilia length in left–right development

Petra Pintado, Pedro Sampaio, Bárbara Tavares, Thomas D. Montenegro-Johnson, David J. Smith & Susana S. Lopes
Reduction in the length of motile cilia in the zebrafish left–right organizer (LRO), also known as Kupffer's vesicle, has a large impact on left–right development. Here we demonstrate through genetic overexpression in zebrafish embryos and mathematical modelling that the impact of increased motile cilia length in embryonic LRO fluid flow is milder than that of short cilia. Through Arl13b overexpression, which increases cilia length without impacting cilia beat frequency, we show that the increase in...

Data from: Comparative analysis of vestibular ecomorphology in birds

Roger B. J. Benson, Ethan Starmer-Jones, Roger A. Close & Stig A. Walsh
The bony labyrinth of vertebrates houses the semicircular canals. These sense rotational accelerations of the head and play an essential role in gaze stabilisation during locomotion. The sizes and shapes of the semicircular canals have hypothesised relationships to agility and locomotory modes in many groups, including birds, and a burgeoning palaeontological literature seeks to make ecological interpretations from the morphology of the labyrinth in extinct species. Rigorous tests of form–function relationships for the vestibular system...

Data from: An early chondrichthyan and the evolutionary assembly of a shark body plan

Michael I. Coates, John A. Finarelli, Ivan J. Sansom, Plamen S. Andreev, Katharine E. Criswell, Kristen Tietjen, Mark L. Rivers & Patrick J. La Riviere
Although relationships among the major groups of living gnathostomes are well established, the relatedness of early jawed vertebrates to modern clades is intensely debated. Here, we provide a new description of Gladbachus, a Middle Devonian (Givetian ~385-million-year-old) stem chondrichthyan from Germany, and one of the very few early chondrichthyans in which substantial portions of the endoskeleton are preserved. Tomographic and histological techniques reveal new details of the gill skeleton, hyoid arch and jaws, neurocranium, cartilage,...

Data from: Haemoglobin-mediated response to hyper-thermal stress in the keystone species Daphnia magna

Maria Cuenca Cambronero, Bettina Zeis & Luisa Orsini
Anthropogenic global warming has become a major geological and environmental force driving drastic changes in natural ecosystems. Due to the high thermal conductivity of water and the effects of temperature on metabolic processes, freshwater ecosystems are among the most impacted by these changes. The ability to tolerate changes in temperature may determine species long-term survival and fitness. Therefore, it is critical to identify coping mechanisms to thermal and hyper-thermal stress in aquatic organisms. A central...

Denitrification and greenhouse gas emissions in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems [LTLS]

S. Ullah & F. Sgouridis
Data comprise monthly field measurements of in-situ denitrification rates in different land use types of the Ribble Wyre and Conwy catchments. The data include greenhouse gas emissions (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide), denitrification data (nitrogen and nitrous oxide) and soil properties data (nitrate, dissolved nitrogen, ammonia, bulk density, carbon to nitrogen ratio, dissolved organic carbon, moisture content, organic matter content, pH, temperature and water filled pore space). The research was funded by the UK Natural...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Birmingham
    12
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • University of Bristol
    2
  • KU Leuven
    2
  • National Museum
    1
  • University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
    1
  • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1
  • University of Münster
    1
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    1