11 Works

Data from: Phylogeography of the small Indian civet and origin of introductions to western Indian Ocean islands

Philippe Gaubert, Riddhi Patel, Geraldine Veron, Steve M. Goodman, Maraike Willsch, Raquel Vasconcelos, Andre Lourenço, Marie Sigaud, Fabienne Justy, Bheem Dutt Joshi, Joerns Fickel & Abdreas Wilting
The biogeographic dynamics affecting the Indian subcontinent, East and Southeast Asia during the Plio-Pleistocene has generated complex biodiversity patterns. We assessed the molecular biogeography of the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica) through mitogenome and cytochrome b + control region sequencing of 89 historical and modern samples to (i) establish a time-calibrated phylogeography across the species’ native range and (ii) test introduction scenarios to western Indian Ocean islands. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified three geographic lineages (East...

Data from: Vegetation as self-adaptive coastal protection: reduction of current velocity and morphologic plasticity of a brackish marsh pioneer

Jana Carus, Maike Paul & Boris Schröder
By reducing current velocity, tidal marsh vegetation can diminish storm surges and storm waves. Conversely, currents often exert high mechanical stresses onto the plants and hence affect vegetation structure and plant characteristics. In our study, we aim at analysing this interaction from both angles. On the one hand, we quantify the reduction of current velocity by Bolboschoenus maritimus, and on the other hand, we identify functional traits of B. maritimus’ ramets along environmental gradients. Our...

Data from: Solute and sediment export from Amazon forest and soybean headwater streams

Shelby H. Riskin, Christopher Neill, KathiJo Jankowski, Alex V. Krusche, Richard McHorney, Helmut Elsenbeer, Marcia N. Macedo, Darlisson Costa Nunes & Stephen Porder
Intensive cropland agriculture commonly increases streamwater solute concentrations and export from small watersheds. In recent decades, the lowland tropics have become the world's largest and most important region of cropland expansion. Although the effects of intensive cropland agriculture on streamwater chemistry and watershed export have been widely studied in temperate regions, their effects in tropical regions are poorly understood. We sampled seven headwater streams draining watersheds in forest (n=3) or soybeans (n=4) to examine the...

Data from: Tropical ancient DNA reveals relationships of the extinct Bahamian giant tortoise Chelonoidis alburyorum

Christian Kehlmaier, Axel Barlow, Alexander K. Hastings, Melita Vamberger, Johanna L. A. Paijmans, David W. Steadman, Nancy A. Albury, Richard Franz, Michael Hofreiter & Uwe Fritz
Ancient DNA of extinct species from the Pleistocene and Holocene has provided valuable evolutionary insights. However, these are largely restricted to mammals and high latitudes because DNA preservation in warm climates is typically poor. In the tropics and subtropics, non-avian reptiles constitute a significant part of the fauna and little is known about the genetics of the many extinct reptiles from tropical islands. We have reconstructed the near-complete mitochondrial genome of an extinct giant tortoise...

Data from: Kin recognition in a clonal fish, Poecilia formosa

Amber M. Makowicz, Ralph Tiedemann, Rachel N. Steele & Ingo Schlupp
Relatedness strongly influences social behaviors in a wide variety of species. For most species, the highest typical degree of relatedness is between full siblings with 50% shared genes. However, this is poorly understood in species with unusually high relatedness between individuals: clonal organisms. Although there has been some investigation into clonal invertebrates and yeast, nothing is known about kin selection in clonal vertebrates. We show that a clonal fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa), can...

Data from: The effect of reintroductions on the genetic variability in Eurasian lynx populations: the cases of Bohemian-Bavarian and Vosges-Palatinian populations

James K. Bull, Marco Heurich, Alexander P. Saveljev, Krzysztof Schmidt, Jörns Fickel & Daniel W. Förster
Over the past ~40 years, several attempts were made to reintroduce Eurasian lynx to suitable habitat within their former distribution range in Western Europe. In general, limited numbers of individuals have been released to establish new populations. To evaluate the effects of reintroductions on the genetic status of lynx populations we used 12 microsatellite loci to study lynx populations in the Bohemian–Bavarian and Vosges–Palatinian forests. Compared with autochthonous lynx populations, these two reintroduced populations displayed...

Data from: Recent extinctions disturb path to equilibrium diversity in Caribbean bats

Luis Valente, Rampal Etienne & Liliana Dávalos
Islands are ideal systems to reconstruct changes in biodiversity and reveal the influence of humans on natural communities. While theory predicts biodiversity on islands tends towards equilibrium, the recent extinction of large proportions of island biotas complicates testing this model. The well-preserved subfossil record of Caribbean bats provides a rare opportunity to model diversity dynamics in an insular community. Here we reconstruct the diversity trajectory in noctilionoid bats of the Greater Antilles by applying a...

Data from: Homogenous population genetic structure of the non-native raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in Europe as a result of rapid population expansion

Frank Drygala, Николай Кораблев, Hermann Ansorge, Joerns Fickel, Marja Isomursu, Morten Elmeros, Rafal Kowalczyk, Laima Baltrunaite, Linas Balciauskas, Urmas Saarma, Christoph Schulze, Peter Borkenhagen, Alain C. Frantz & Rafał Kowalczyk
The extent of gene flow during the range expansion of non-native species influences the amount of genetic diversity retained in expanding populations. Here, we analyse the population genetic structure of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in north-eastern and central Europe. This invasive species is of management concern because it is highly susceptible to fox rabies and an important secondary host of the virus. We hypothesized that the large number of introduced animals and the species’...

Data from: Individual variation in energy-saving heterothermy affects survival and reproductive success

Melanie Dammhahn, Manuelle Landry-Cuerrier, Denis Réale, Dany Garant & Murray M. Humphries
Given fundamental energetic trade-offs among growth, maintenance and reproduction, individual differences in energy saving should have consequences for survival and reproductive success. Many endotherms use periodic heterothermy to reduce energy and water requirements and individual variation in heterothermy should have fitness consequences. However, attempts to disentangle individual- and population-level variation in heterothermy are scarce. Here, we quantified patterns of heterothermy of 55 free-ranging eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus), food-hoarding hibernators. Over five hibernation periods, we obtained...

Data from: Do cities represent sources, sinks or isolated islands for urban wild boar population structure?

Milena Stillfried, Joerns Fickel, Konstantin Börner, Ulrich Wittstatt, Mike Heddergott, Sylvia Ortmann, Stephanie Kramer-Schadt & Alain C. Frantz
Urban sprawl has resulted in the permanent presence of large mammal species in urban areas, leading to human–wildlife conflicts. Wild boar Sus scrofa are establishing a permanent presence in many cities in Europe, with the largest German urban population occurring in Berlin. Despite their relatively long-term presence, there is little knowledge of colonization processes, dispersal patterns or connectivity of Berlin's populations, hampering the development of effective management plans. We used 13 microsatellite loci to genotype...

Data from: Ancient DNA reveals differences in behaviour and sociality between brown bears and extinct cave bears

Gloria Gonzalez-Fortes, Aurora Grandal-D'Anglade, Ben Kolbe, Daniel Fernandes, Ioana N. Meleg, Ana Garcia-Vazquez, Ana C. Pinto-Llona, Silviu Constantin, Trino J. De Torres, Jose E. Ortiz, Christine Frischauf, Gernot Rabeder, Michael Hofreiter, Axel Barlow & Gloria G. Fortes
Ancient DNA studies have revolutionized the study of extinct species and populations, providing insights on phylogeny, phylogeography, admixture and demographic history. However, inferences on behaviour and sociality have been far less frequent. Here, we investigate the complete mitochondrial genomes of extinct Late Pleistocene cave bears and middle Holocene brown bears that each inhabited multiple geographically proximate caves in northern Spain. In cave bears, we find that, although most caves were occupied simultaneously, each cave almost...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    11

Affiliations

  • University of Potsdam
    11
  • Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research
    4
  • National Museum
    1
  • Antiquities, Monuments and Museum Corporation
    1
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    1
  • Technische Universität Braunschweig
    1
  • University of Groningen
    1
  • Aarhus University
    1
  • Polish Academy of Sciences
    1
  • McGill University
    1