25 Works

Data from: Arctic fungal communities associated with roots of Bistorta vivipara do not respond to the same fine-scale edaphic gradients as the above-ground vegetation

Sunil Mundra, Rune Halvorsen, Håvard Kauserud, Eike Müller, Unni Vik & Pernille B. Eidesen
Soil conditions and microclimate are important determinants of the fine-scale distribution of plant species in the Arctic, creating locally heterogeneous vegetation. We hypothesize that root-associated fungal (RAF) communities respond to the same fine-scale environmental gradients as the aboveground vegetation, creating a coherent pattern between aboveground vegetation and RAF. We explored how RAF communities of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) plant Bistorta vivipara and aboveground vegetation structure of arctic plants were affected by biotic and abiotic variables at...

Data from: Late Pleistocene origin of the entire circumarctic range of the arctic-alpine plant Kalmia procumbens

Hajime Ikeda, Pernille Bronken Eidesen, Valentin Yakubov, Vyacheslav Barkalov, Christian Brochmann & Hiroaki Setoguchi
The circumarctic ranges of arctic-alpine plants are thought to have been established in the late Pliocene/early Pleistocene, when the modern arctic tundra was formed in response to climate cooling. Previous findings of range-wide genetic structure in arctic-alpine plants have been thought to support this hypothesis, but few studies have explicitly addressed the temporal framework of the genetic structure. Here, we estimated the demographic history of the genetic structure in the circumarctic Kalmia procumbens using sequences...

Experimentally increased snow depth affects High Arctic microarthropods inconsistently over two consecutive winters

Eveline Krab, Erik Lundin, Stephen Coulson, Ellen Dorrepaal & Elisabeth Cooper
Climate change induced alterations to winter conditions may affect decomposer organisms controlling the vast carbon stores in northern soils. Soil microarthropods are abundant decomposers in Arctic ecosystems affecting soil carbon release through their activities. We studied whether increased snow depth affected microarthropods, and if effects were consistent over two consecutive winters. We sampled Collembola and soil mites from a snow accumulation experiment at Svalbard in early summer and used soil microclimatic data to explore to...

Context dependent fitness costs of reproduction despite stable body mass costs in an Arctic herbivore

Gabriel Pigeon, Steve Albon, Leif Egil Loe, Richard Bischof, Christophe Bonenfant, Mads Farchhammer, Justine Irvine, Erik Ropstad, Vebjorn Veiberg & Audun Stein
1. The cost of reproduction on demographic rates is often assumed to operate through changing body condition. Several studies have found that reproduction depresses body mass more if the current conditions are severe, such as high population densities or adverse weather, than under benign environmental conditions. However, few studies have investigated the association between the fitness and body mass costs of reproduction. 2. Using 25 years of individual-based capture-recapture data from Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus...

Variation and correlation in the timing of breeding of North Atlantic seabirds across multiple scales

Katharine Keogan, Francis Daunt, Sarah Wanless, Richard Phillips, David Alvarez, Tycho Anker-Nilssen, Robert Barrett, Claus Bech, Peter Becker, Per-Arvid Berglund, Sandra Bouwhuis, Zofia Burr, Olivier Chastel, Signe Christensen-Dalsgaard, Sébastien Descamps, Tony Diamond, Kyle Elliott, Kjell Einar Erikstad, Mike Harris, Jonas Hentati-Sundberg, Martin Heubeck, Magdalene Langset, Svein Lorentsen, Heather Major, Mark Mallory … & Stephen Kress
Timing of breeding, an important driver of fitness in many populations, is widely studied in the context of global change, yet despite considerable efforts to identify environmental drivers of seabird nesting phenology, for most populations we lack evidence of strong drivers. Here we adopt an alternative approach, examining the degree to which different populations positively covary in their annual phenology to infer whether phenological responses to environmental drivers are likely to be (i) shared across...

Data from: Little impact of over-winter parasitism on a free-ranging ungulate in the high Arctic

Anja Morven Carlsson, Steve D. Albon, Stephen J. Coulson, Erik Ropstad, Audun Stien, Ken Wilson, Leif Egil Loe, Vebjørn Veiberg, Robert Justin Irvine & Kenneth Wilson
1.Macroparasites have a central place in wildlife ecology because they have the potential to regulate host populations through effects on reproduction and/or survival. However, there remains a paucity of studies that have demonstrated the regulatory role of these parasites in free-ranging animals. 2.Previous work on Svalbard reindeer demonstrated that the experimental removal of the parasitic gastrointestinal nematode Ostertagia gruehneri transmitted in summer, improved reindeer fecundity, and that the species was capable of mediating a density-dependent...

Data from: Comparative analyses of plastid and AFLP data suggest different colonization history and asymmetric hybridisation between Betula pubescens and B. nana

Pernille Bronken Eidesen, Inger Greve Alsos & Christian Brochmann
Birches (Betula spp.) hybridize readily, confounding genetic signatures of refugial isolation and postglacial migration. We aimed to distinguish hybridization from range-shift processes in the two widespread and cold-adapted species B. nana and B. pubescens, previously shown to share a similarly east–west-structured variation in plastid DNA (pDNA). We sampled the two species throughout their ranges and included reference samples of five other Betula species and putative hybrids. We analysed 901 individual plants using mainly nuclear high-resolution...

Data from: Proactive avoidance behaviour and pace-of-life syndrome in Atlantic salmon

Børge Damsgård, Tor H. Evensen, Øyvind Øverli, Marnix Gorissen, Lars Ebbesson, Sonia Ray & Erik Höglund
Individuals in a fish population differ in key life history traits such as growth rate and body size. This raises the question of whether such traits cluster along a fast-slow growth continuum according to a pace-of-life syndrome (POLS). Fish species like salmonids may develop a bimodal size distribution, providing an opportunity to study the relationships between individual growth and behavioural responsiveness. Here we test whether proactive characteristics (bold behaviour coupled with low post-stress cortisol production)...

Data from: Temporal variation of Bistorta vivipara-associated ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in the High Arctic

Sunil Mundra, Mohammad Bahram, Leho Tedersoo, Håvard Kauserud, Rune Halvorsen, Pernille Eidesen & Pernille Bronken Eidesen
Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi are important for efficient nutrient uptake of several widespread arctic plant species. Knowledge of temporal variation of ECM fungi, and the relationship of these patterns to environmental variables, is essential to understand energy and nutrient cycling in Arctic ecosystems. We sampled roots of Bistorta vivipara ten times over two years; three times during the growing-season (June, July and September) and twice during winter (November and April) of both years. We found 668...

Data from: Large-scale oceanographic fluctuations drive Antarctic petrel survival and reproduction

Sebastien Descamps, Arnaud Tarroux, Svein Håkon Lorentsen, Oliver P. Love, Øystein Varpe & Nigel G. Yoccoz
Polar Regions are experiencing environmental changes at unprecedented rates. These changes can spread throughout entire food webs from lower trophic levels to apex predators. As many top predators forage over large areas, these indirect effects may be associated with large-scale patterns of climate variability. Using global climate indices that are known to impact the Southern Ocean ecosystem (the El Niño Southern Oscillation and Antarctic Oscillation Indices) we assessed their efficacy to predict variation in the...

Data from: Fungi ahoy! Diversity on marine wooden substrata in the high North

Teppo Rämä, Jenni Nordén, Marie L. Davey, Geir H. Mathiassen, Joseph W. Spatafora & Håvard Kauserud
Marine fungi are severely understudied in the polar regions. We used molecularly identified cultures to study fungi inhabiting 50 intertidal and sea-floor logs along the North Norwegian coast. The aim was to explore the taxonomic and ecological diversity and to examine factors shaping the marine wood-inhabiting fungal communities. The 577 pure cultures analyzed clustered into 147 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 97 % ITS sequence similarity. Ascomycota dominated, but OTUs belonging to Basidiomycota, Mucoromycotina...

Data from: Genetic diversity and connectivity within Mytilus spp. in the subarctic and Arctic

Sofie Smedegaard Mathiesen, Jakob Thyrring, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Jørgen Berge, Alexey Sukhotin, Peter Leopold, Michaël Bekaert, Mikael Kristian Sejr & Einar E. Nielsen
Climate changes in the Arctic are predicted to alter distributions of marine species. However, such changes are difficult to quantify because information on present species distribution and the genetic variation within species is lacking or poorly examined. Blue mussels, Mytilus spp. are ecosystem engineers in the coastal zone globally. In order to improve knowledge of distribution and genetic structure of the Mytilus edulis complex in the Arctic, we analyzed 81 SNPs in 534 Mytilus spp....

Calanus InDel genotypes from: No evidence for hybridization between Calanus finmarchicus and C. glacialis in a subarctic area of sympatry

Marvin Choquet, Gauthier Burckard, Stig Skreslet, Galice Hoarau & Janne E. Søreide
In the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean, four species of the copepod genus Calanus dominate the zooplankton biomass. Because of their morphological resemblance, knowledge of their respective distribution range has long been biased by misidentification, until the recent use of molecular tools uncovered numerous areas of sympatry. As hybridization between Calanus finmarchicus and C. glacialis has been claimed in the East-Canadian Arctic based on microsatellites, we investigated further the potential for interbreeding in newly...

Community composition of arctic root-associated fungi mirrors host plant phylogeny

S S Botnen, E Thoen, P B Eidesen, A K Krabberød & H Kauserud
The number of plant species regarded as non-mycorrhizal increases at higher latitudes, and several plant species in the High-Arctic Archipelago Svalbard have been reported as non-mycorrhizal. We used the rRNA ITS2 and 18S gene markers to survey which fungi, as well as other micro-eukaryotes, were associated with roots of 31 arctic plant species not usually regarded as mycorrhizal in Svalbard. We assessed to what degree the root-associated fungi showed any host preference and whether the...

Data from: Experimental icing affects growth, mortality, and flowering in a high Arctic dwarf shrub

Jos M. Milner, Øystein Varpe, René Van Der Wal & Brage Bremset Hansen
Effects of climate change are predicted to be greatest at high latitudes, with more pronounced warming in winter than summer. Extreme mid-winter warm spells and heavy rain-on-snow events are already increasing in frequency in the Arctic, with implications for snow-pack and ground-ice formation. These may in turn affect key components of Arctic ecosystems. However, the fitness consequences of extreme winter weather events for tundra plants are not well understood, especially in the high Arctic. We...

Data from: Adaptation potential of the copepod Eurytemora affinis to a future warmer Baltic Sea

Konrad Karlsson & Monika Winder
To predict effects of global change on zooplankton populations, it is important to understand how present species adapt to temperature and how they respond to stressors interacting with temperature. Here we ask if the calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis from the Baltic Sea can adapt to future climate warming. Populations were sampled at sites with different temperatures. Full sibling families were reared in the lab and used in two common garden experiments (1) populations crossed over...

Herbivores reduce seedling recruitment in alpine plant communities

Øystein H. Opedal, Kristin Nystuen, Dagmar Hagen, Håkon Holien, Mia Sørensen, Simone Lang, Sigrid Lindmo, G. RIchard Strimbeck & Bente Graae
Through changes in climate and other environmental factors, alpine tundra ecosystems are subject to increased cover of erect shrubs, reduced predictability of rodent dynamics, and changes in wild and domesticated herbivore densities. To predict the dynamics of these ecosystems, we need to understand how these simultaneous changes affect alpine vegetation. In the long term, vegetation dynamics may depend critically on seedling recruitment. To study drivers of alpine plant seedling recruitment, we set up a field...

Data from: Sequence clustering threshold has little effect on the recovery of microbial community structure

Synnøve Smebye Botnen, Marie Louise Davey, Rune Halvorsen & Håvard Kauserud
Analysis of microbial community structure by multivariate ordination methods, using data obtained by high throughput sequencing of amplified markers (i.e., DNA metabarcoding), often requires clustering of DNA sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Parameters for the clustering procedure tend not to be justified but are set by tradition rather than being based on explicit knowledge. In this study, we explore the extent to which ordination results are affected by variation in parameter settings for the...

Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) concentrations in the marine Arctic environment collected between 26-Aug-2019 to 28-Aug-2019

Jack Garnett, Crispin Halsall, Anna Vader, Hanna Joerss, Ralf Ebinghaus, Amber Leeson & Peter Wynn
Samples of snow, sea ice, seawater (0.5 m and 5 m depths) and meltponds were collected from two ice-covered stations located in the Barents Sea (81 N), during the "Nansen Legacy Q3" summer cruise of the Norwegian research vessel Kronprins Haakon on 26-28 August 2019. Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) concentrations, salinity and stable oxygen isotopes were measured in all samples to determine sources and environmental fate of PFAS during late summer. NERC ENVISION Doctoral Training Centre...

Data from: Low host specificity among arctic root-assosiated fungi

Synnøve Botnen, Unni Vik, Tor Carlsen, Pernille B. Eidesen, Marie L. Davey & Håvard Kauserud
In High Arctic ecosystems, plant growth and reproduction are limited by low soil moisture and nutrient availability, low soil and air temperatures, and a short growing season. Mycorrhizal associations facilitate plant nutrient acquisition and water uptake and may therefore be particularly ecologically important in nutrition-poor and dry environments, such as parts of the Arctic. Similarly, endophytic root associates are thought to play a protective role, increasing plants' stress tolerance, and likely have an important ecosystem...

Data from: Ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi respond differently to long-term experimentally increased snow depth in the High Arctic

Sunil Mundra, Rune Halvorsen, Håvard Kauserud, Mohammad Bahram, Leho Tedersoo, Bo Elberling, Elisabeth J. Cooper & Pernille Bronken Eidesen
Changing climate is expected to alter precipitation patterns in the Arctic, with consequences for subsurface temperature and moisture conditions, community structure, and nutrient mobilization through microbial belowground processes. Here, we address the effect of increased snow depth on the variation in species richness and community structure of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and saprotrophic fungi. Soil samples were collected weekly from mid-July to mid-September in both control and deep snow plots. Richness of ECM fungi was lower, while...

Data from: Biological introduction threats from shipping in a warming Arctic

Chris Ware, Jørgen Berge, Anders Jelmert, Steffen M. Olsen, Loïc Pellissier, Mary Wisz, Darren Kriticos, Georgy Semenov, Slawomir Kwasniewski & Inger G. Alsos
Several decades of research on invasive marine species have yielded a broad understanding of the nature of species invasion mechanisms and associated threats globally. However, this is not true of the Arctic, a region where ongoing climatic changes may promote species invasion. Here, we evaluated risks associated with non-indigenous propagule loads discharged with ships' ballast water to the high-Arctic archipelago, Svalbard, as a case study for the wider Arctic. We sampled and identified transferred propagules...

Data from: Genetics redraws pelagic biogeography of Calanus

Marvin Choquet, Maja Hatlebakk, Anusha K.S. Dhanasiri, Ksenia Kosobokova, Irina Smolina, Janne E. Søreide, Camilla Svensen, Webjørn Melle, Sławomir Kwaśniewski, Ketil Eiane, Malin Daase, Vigdis Tverberg, Stig Skreslet, Ann Bucklin & Galice Hoarau
Planktonic copepods of the genus Calanus play a central role in North Atlantic/Arctic marine food webs. Here, using molecular markers, we redrew the distributional ranges of Calanus species inhabiting the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans and revealed much wider and more broadly overlapping distributions than previously described. The Arctic shelf species, C. glacialis, dominated the zooplankton assemblage of many Norwegian fjords, where only C. finmarchicus has been reported previously. In these fjords, high occurrences of...

Data from: Does warming by open-top chambers induce change in the root-associated fungal community of the arctic dwarf shrub Cassiope tetragona (Ericaceae)?

Kelsey Erin Lorberau, Synnøve Smebye Botnen, Sunil Mundra, Anders Bjørnsgaard Aas, Jelte Rozema, Pernille Bronken Eidesen & Håvard Kauserud
Climate change may alter mycorrhizal communities, which impact ecosystem characteristics such as carbon sequestration processes. These impacts occur at a greater magnitude in Arctic ecosystems, where the climate is warming faster than in lower latitudes. Cassiope tetragona (L.) D. Don is an Arctic plant species in the Ericaceae family with a circumpolar range. C. tetragona has been reported to form ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM) as well as ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbioses. In this study, the fungal taxa...

Root associated fungi in Arctic Glacier Forlands raw sequences

Pernille Bronken Eidesen, Synnøve S. Botnen, Sunil Mundra & Håvard Kauserud
Climate change causes Arctic glaciers to retreat faster, exposing new areas for colonization. Several pioneer plants likely to colonize recent deglaciated, nutrient-poor areas depend on fungal partners for successful establishment. Little is known about general patterns or characteristics of facilitating fungal pioneers and how they vary with regional climate in the Arctic. The High Arctic Archipelago Svalbard represents an excellent study system to address these questions, as glaciers cover ∼60% of the land surface and...

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