37 Works

Marine ecoregions and subecoregions within Indo-West Australian waters: A statistical approach based on species distributions

Hadiyanto Hadiyanto, Renae Hovey, Christopher Glasby & Jane Prince
Aim: The Marine Ecoregions of the World (MEOW) system delineates the oceans into 232 ecoregions. Here, we aimed to evaluate the suitability of this system to represent species distributions within Indo-West Australian waters, explore alternative ecoregions and new subecoregions, and investigate environmental variables that are correlated with species distributions within those waters. Location: Indo-West Australia Taxa: Vertebrates, invertebrates, marine plants Methods: We downloaded occurrence data for 14,513 marine species from the Ocean Biogeographic Information System....

Complex histories of gene flow and a mitochondrial capture event in a non-sister pair of bird

Ethan Gyllenhaal, Michael Andersen, Jenna McCullough, Xena Mapel, Tri Haryoko, Knud Jønsson & Leo Joseph
Hybridization, introgression, and reciprocal gene flow during speciation, specifically the generation of mitonuclear discordance, are increasingly observed as parts of the speciation process. Genomic approaches provide insight into where, when, and how adaptation operates during and after speciation and can measure historical and modern introgression. Whether adaptive or neutral in origin, hybridization can cause mitonuclear discordance by placing the mitochondrial genome of one species (or population) in the nuclear background of another species. The latter,...

Data from: Rapid divergence of mussel populations despite incomplete barriers to dispersal

Diede L. Maas, Stefan Prost, Ke Bi, Lydia L. Smith, Ellie E. Armstrong, Ludi P. Aji, Abdul H.A. Toha, Rosemary G. Gillespie & Leontine E. Becking
Striking genetic structure among marine populations at small spatial scales is becoming evident with extensive molecular studies. Such observations suggest isolation at small scales may play an important role in forming patterns of genetic diversity within species. Isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-environment, and historical priority effects are umbrella terms for a suite of processes that underlie genetic structure, but their relative importance at different spatial and temporal scales remains elusive. Here, we use marine lakes in Indonesia to...

Data from: Barcoding snakeheads (Teleostei, Channidae) revisited: discovering greater species diversity and resolving perpetuated taxonomic confusions

Cecilia Conte-Grand, Ralf Britz, Neelesh Dahanukar, Rajeev Raghavan, Rohan Pethiyagoda, Hoek Hui Tan, Renny Kurnia Hadiaty, Norsham S. Yaakob, Lukas Rüber & Heok Hui Tan
Snakehead fishes of the family Channidae are predatory freshwater teleosts from Africa and Asia comprising 38 valid species. Snakeheads are important food fishes (aquaculture, live food trade) and have been introduced widely with several species becoming highly invasive. A channid barcode library was recently assembled by Serrao and co-workers to better detect and identify potential and established invasive snakehead species outside their native range. Comparing our own recent phylogenetic results of this taxonomically confusing group...

Interrogating discordance resolves relationships in the rapid radiation of Old World fruit bats (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae)

Nicolas Nesi, Stephen Rossiter, Michael McGowen, Georgia Tsagkogeorga, Burton Lim, Susan Tsang, Violaine Nicolas, Aude Lalis, Silke Riesle Sbarbaro, Sigit Wiantoro, Alan Hitch, Javier Juste, Corinna Pinzari, Frank Bonaccorso, Nancy Simmons, Annette Scanlon & Christopher Todd
The family Pteropodidae (Old World fruit bats) comprises >200 species distributed across the Old World tropics and subtropics. Most pteropodids feed on fruit, suggesting an early origin of frugivory, although several lineages have shifted to nectar-based diets. Pteropodids are of exceptional conservation concern with >50% of species considered threatened, yet the systematics of this group has long been debated, with uncertainty surrounding early splits attributed to an ancient rapid diversification. Resolving the relationships among the...

Data from: Plio-Pleistocene phylogeography of the Southeast Asian Blue Panchax killifish, Aplocheilus panchax

Samantha V. Beck, Gary R. Carvalho, Axel Barlow, Lukas Rüber, Heok Hui Tan, Estu Nugroho, Daisy Wowor, Siti Azizah Mohd Nor, Fabian Herder, Zainal A. Muchlisin & Mark De Bruyn
The complex climatic and geological history of Southeast Asia has shaped this region’s high biodiversity. In particular, sea level fluctuations associated with repeated glacial cycles during the Pleistocene both facilitated, and limited, connectivity between populations. In this study, we used data from two mitochondrial and three anonymous nuclear markers to determine whether a fresh/brackish water killifish, Aplocheilus panchax, Hamilton, 1822, could be used to further understand how climatic oscillations and associated sea level fluctuations have...

Data from: Convergent evolution of body color between sympatric freshwater fishes via different visual sensory evolution

Javier Montenegro, Koji Mochida, Kumi Matsui, Daniel F. Mokodongan, Bayu K. A. Sumarto, Sjamsu A. Lawelle, Andy B. Nofrianto, Renny K. Hadiaty, Kawilarang W. A. Masengi, Lengxob Yong, Nobuyuki Inomata, Takahiro Irie, Yasuyuki Hashiguchi, Yohey Terai, Jun Kitano & Kazunori Yamahira
Although there are many examples of color evolution potentially driven by sensory drive, only few studies have examined whether distinct species inhabiting the same environments evolve similar body colors via shared sensory mechanisms. In this study, we tested whether two sympatric freshwater fish taxa, halfbeaks of the genus Nomorhamphus and ricefishes of the genus Oryzias in Sulawesi Island, converge in both body color and visual sensitivity. After reconstructing the phylogeny separately for Nomorhamphus and Oryzias...

Data from: Mitochondrial haplotypes indicate parapatric-like phylogeographic structure in blue-spotted maskray (Neotrygon kuhlii) from the Coral Triangle region

Irma S. Arlyza, Kang-Ning Shen, Jean-Dominique Durand & Philippe Borsa
Phylogeographic structure was investigated in the blue-spotted maskray, Neotrygon kuhlii, focusing on the Coral Triangle region. We used as genetic marker a 519-bp fragment of the cytochrome c-oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, sequenced in a total of 147 individuals from 26 sampling locations. The parsimony network of COI haplotypes was split into seven distinct clades within the Coral Triangle region. Different clades had exclusive but contiguous geographic distributions, indicating parapatric-like phylogeographic structure. Strong genetic differences...

Delimiting cryptic species within the brown-banded bamboo shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum in the Indo-Australian region with mitochondrial DNA and genome-wide SNP approaches

Fahmi Fahmi, Christine Dudgeon, Ian Tibbetts, Mike Bennett & Chris Dudgeon
Background Delimiting cryptic species in elasmobranchs is a major challenge in modern taxonomy due the lack of available phenotypic features. Employing stand-alone genetics in splitting a cryptic species may prove problematic for further studies and for implementing conservation management. In this study, we examined mitochondrial DNA and genome-wide nuclear single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the brown-banded bambooshark, Chiloscyllium punctatum to evaluate potential cryptic species and the species-population boundary in the group. Results Both mtDNA and...

Data from: Wild Goffin’s cockatoos flexibly manufacture and use tool sets

Mark O'Hara, Berenika Mioduszewska, Roger Mundry, , Tri Haryoko, Rini Rachmatika, Dewi Malia Prawiradilaga, Ludwig Huber & Alice Marie Isabel Auersperg
The use of different tools to achieve a single goal is considered unique to human and primate technology. To unravel the origins of such complex behaviors, it is crucial to investigate tool use that does not occur species wide. These cases can be assumed to have emerged innovatively and be applied flexibly, thus emphasizing creativity and intelligence. However, it is intrinsically challenging to record tool innovations in natural settings that do not occur species-wide. Here...

Sexual dimorphism in an adaptive radiation: Does intersexual niche differentiation result in ecological character displacement?

Benjamin D. Wasiljew, Jobst Pfaender, Benjamin Wipfler, Mariam Gabelaia, Ilham Vermandra Utama, Letha Louisiana Wantania & Fabian Herder
Evolutionary radiations are one plausible explanation for the rich biodiversity on Earth. Adaptive radiations are the most studied form of evolutionary radiations and ecological opportunity has been identified as one factor permitting them. Competition among individuals is supposedly highest in populations of conspecifics. Divergent modes of resource use might minimize trophic overlap, and thus intersexual competition, resulting in ecological character displacement between sexes. However, the role of intersexual differentiation in speciation processes is insufficiently studied....

Data from: Historical processes and contemporary ocean currents drive genetic structure in the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the Indo-Australian Archipelago

Udhi E. Hernawan, Kor-Jent Van Dijk, Gary A. Kendrick, Ming Feng, Edward Biffin, Paul S. Lavery & Kathryn McMahon
Understanding spatial patterns of gene flow and genetic structure is essential for the conservation of marine ecosystems. Contemporary ocean currents and historical isolation due to Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations have been predicted to influence the genetic structure in marine populations. In the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA), the world's hotspot of marine biodiversity, seagrasses are a vital component but population genetic information is very limited. Here, we reconstructed the phylogeography of the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the IAA...

Global Diversification Dynamics Since the Jurassic: Low Dispersal and Habitat-Dependent Evolution Explain Hotspots of Diversity and Shell Disparity in River Snails (Viviparidae)

Björn Stelbrink, Romy Richter, Frank Köhler, Frank Riedel, Ellen Strong, Bert Van Bocxlaer, Christian Albrecht, Torsten Hauffe, Timothy Page, David Aldridge, Arthur Bogan, Li-Na Du, Marivene Manuel-Santos, Ristiyanti Marwoto, Alena Shirokaya & Thomas Von Rintelen
The Viviparidae, commonly known as River Snails, is a dominant group of freshwater snails with a nearly worldwide distribution that reaches its highest taxonomic and morphological diversity in Southeast Asia. The rich fossil record is indicative of a probable Middle Jurassic origin on the Laurasian supercontinent where the group started to diversify during the Cretaceous. However, it remains uncertain when and how the biodiversity hotspot in Southeast Asia was formed. Here, we used a comprehensive...

Weda, a new genus with two new species of Euphorbiaceae-Crotonoideae from Halmahera (North Moluccas, Indonesia) and phylogenetic relationships of the Australasian tribe Ricinocarpeae

Peter Van Welzen, Susana Arias Guerrero, Deby Arifiani, Tjut Bangun, Roderick Bouman, Marcel Eurlings, Iska Gushilman, Peter Philipson, Iris Tabak, Esmée Winkel & Kenneth Wurdack
Two unknown Euphorbiaceae were discovered during the environmental impact study for a proposed nickel mine behind Weda Bay on Halmahera in the North Moluccas (Maluku Utara Province) of Indonesia. Morphological comparisons and molecular phylogenetic analyses using four markers (plastid trnL-F and rbcL, and nuclear ribosomal ITS and ETS) indicated they should be recognized as constituting a new, distinct genus of two species, which are described and illustrated here as Weda fragarioides and W. lutea. The...

Data from: Dispersal out of Wallacea spurs diversification of Pteropus flying foxes, the world’s largest bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera)

Susan M. Tsang, Sigit Wiantoro, Maria Josefa Veluz, Norimasa Sugita, Y-Lan Nguyen, Nancy B. Simmons & David J. Lohman
Aim: Islands provide opportunities for isolation and speciation. Many landmasses in the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA) are oceanic islands, and founder-event speciation is expected to be the predominant form of speciation of volant taxa on these islands. We studied the biogeographic history of flying foxes, a group with many endemic species and a predilection for islands, to test this hypothesis and infer the biogeographic origin of the group. Location: Australasia, Indo-Australian Archipelago, Madagascar, Pacific Islands Taxon:...

Paralogs and off-target sequences improve phylogenetic resolution in a densely-sampled study of the breadfruit genus (Artocarpus, Moraceae)

Elliot Gardner, Matthew Johnson, Joan Pereira, Aida Shafreena Ahmad Puad, Deby Arifiani, Sahromi Sahromi, Norman Wickett & Nyree Zerega
We present a 517-gene phylogenetic framework for the breadfruit genus Artocarpus (ca. 70 spp., Moraceae), making use of silica-dried leaves from recent fieldwork and herbarium specimens (some up to 106 years old) to achieve 96% taxon sampling. We explore issues relating to assembly, paralogous loci, partitions, and analysis method to reconstruct a phylogeny that is robust to variation in data and available tools. While codon partitioning did not result in any substantial topological differences, the...

INFLUENCE OF THE SIZE OF TURMERIC MICROPARTICLES REINFORCING AGENT ON MECHANICAL AND BIODEGRADATION PROPERTIES OF CORNSTARCH-BASED BIOPLASTIC MATERIAL: CURRENT STUDIES, EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS, AND PROPOSAL MATERIAL CRACK PHENOMENA DURING MECHANICAL TESTING

A.B.D. Nandiyanto, F. Triawan, M. Fiandini, I.O. Suryani & G.K. Sunnardianto
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sizes of turmeric microparticles (as a reinforcing agent) on the mechanical and biodegradation properties of cornstarch-based bioplastic material. The following fabrication procedures were performed: (1) diluting cornstarch in water; (2) making homogeneous mixture of cornstarch, glycerol and acetic acid by heating at less than 100ºC, (3) additional turmeric with a specific size (i.e. 250, 125, 100, 74 μm); (4) molding process; and (5) drying...

Data from: The evolution of bat vestibular systems in the face of potential antagonistic selection pressures for flight and echolocation

Kalina T. J. Davies, Paul J. J. Bates, Ibnu Maryanto, James A. Cotton & Stephen J. Rossiter
The vestibular system maintains the body’s sense of balance and, therefore, was probably subject to strong selection during evolutionary transitions in locomotion. Among mammals, bats possess unique traits that place unusual demands on their vestibular systems. First, bats are capable of powered flight, which in birds is associated with enlarged semicircular canals. Second, many bats have enlarged cochleae associated with echolocation, and both cochleae and semicircular canals share a space within the petrosal bone. To...

Data from: Evolutionary and dispersal history of Eurasian wild mice Mus musculus clarified by more extensive geographic sampling of mitochondrial DNA

Hitoshi Suzuki, Mitsuo Nunome, Ghota Kinotshita, K. P. Aplin, Peter Vogel, Alexey P. Kryukov, Mei-Lei Jin, Sang-Hoon Han, Ibnu Maryanto, Kimiyuki Tsuchiya, Hidetoshi Ikeda, T. Shiroishi, Hiromichi Yonekawa & Kazuo Moriwaki
We examined sequence variation of mitochondrial DNA control region and cytochrome b gene of the house mouse (Mus musculus sensu lato) drawn from ca. 200 localities, with 290 new samples drawn primarily from previously unsampled portions of their Eurasian distribution and with the objective of further clarifying evolutionary episodes of this species before and after the onset of human-mediated long-distance dispersals. Phylogenetic analysis of the expanded data detected five equally distinct clades, with geographic ranges...

A new, undescribed species of Melanocharis berrypecker from western New Guinea and the evolutionary history of the family Melanocharitidae

Borja Milá, Jade Bruxaux, Guillermo Friis, Katerina Sam, Hidayat Ashari & Christophe Thébaud
Western New Guinea remains one of the last biologically underexplored regions of the world, and much remains to be learned regarding the diversity and evolutionary history of its fauna and flora. During a recent ornithological expedition to the Kumawa Mountains in West Papua, we encountered an undescribed species of Melanocharis berrypecker (Melanocharitidae) in cloud forest at an elevation of 1200 m asl. Its main characteristics are iridescent blue-black upperparts, satin-white underparts washed lemon yellow, and...

Data from: New insights on water buffalo genomic diversity and post-domestication migration routes from medium density SNP chip data

Licia Colli, Marco Milanesi, Elia Vajana, Daniela Iamartino, Lorenzo Bomba, Francesco Puglisi, Marcello Del Corvo, Ezequiel Luis Nicolazzi, Sahar Saad El-Din Ahmed, Jesus Rommel V. Herrera, Libertado Cruz, Shuju Zhang, Aixin Liang, Gouhua Hua, Ligou Yang, Xingjie Hao, Fuyuan Zuo, Song-Jia Lai, Shuilian Wang, Ruyu Liu, Yundeng Gong, Mahdi Mokhber, Yongjiang Mao, Feng Guan, Augustin Vlaic … & Liguo Yang
The domestic water buffalo is native to the Asian continent but through historical migrations and recent importations, nowadays has a worldwide distribution. The two types of water buffalo, i.e., river and swamp, display distinct morphological and behavioral traits, different karyotypes and also have different purposes and geographical distributions. River buffaloes from Pakistan, Iran, Turkey, Egypt, Romania, Bulgaria, Italy, Mozambique, Brazil and Colombia, and swamp buffaloes from China, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia and Brazil were genotyped with...

Data from: Habitat collapse due to overgrazing threatens turtle conservation in marine protected areas

Marjolijn J. A. Christianen, Peter M. J. Herman, Tjeerd J. Bouma, Leon P. M. Lamers, Marieke M. Van Katwijk, Tjisse Van Der Heide, Peter J. Mumby, Brian R. Silliman, Sarah L. Engelhard, Madelon Van De Kerk, Wawan Kiswara & Johan Van De Koppel
Marine protected areas (MPAs) are key tools for combatting the global overexploitation of endangered species. The prevailing paradigm is that MPAs are beneficial in helping to restore ecosystems to more ‘natural’ conditions. However, MPAs may have unintended negative effects when increasing densities of protected species exert destructive effects on their habitat. Here, we report on severe seagrass degradation in a decade-old MPA where hyper-abundant green turtles adopted a previously undescribed below-ground foraging strategy. By digging...

Data from: Genome-wide SNP data unveils the globalization of domesticated pigs

Bin Yang, Leilei Cui, Miguel Perez-Enciso, Aleksei Traspov, Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans, Natalia Zinovieva, Lawrence B. Schook, Alan Archibald, Kesinee Gatphayak, Christophe Knorr, Alex Triantafyllidis, Panoraia Alexandri, Gono Semiadi, Olivier Hanotte, Deodália Dias, Peter Dovč, Pekka Uimari, Laura Iacolina, Massimo Scandura, Martien A. M. Groenen, Lusheng Huang & Hendrik-Jan Megens
Background: Pigs were domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia early during the agricultural revolution, and have since been transported and traded across the globe. Here, we present a worldwide survey on 60K genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for 2093 pigs, including 1839 domestic pigs representing 122 local and commercial breeds, 215 wild boars, and 39 out-group suids, from Asia, Europe, America, Oceania and Africa. The aim of this study was to infer global...

Data from: Revisiting the ichthyodiversity of Java and Bali through DNA barcodes: taxonomic coverage, identification accuracy, cryptic diversity and identification of exotic species

Hadi Dahruddin, Aditya Hutama, Frédéric Busson, Sopian Sauri, Robert Hanner, Philippe Keith, Renny Hadiaty & Nicolas Hubert
Among the 899 species of freshwater fishes reported from Sundaland biodiversity hotspot, nearly 50% are endemics. The functional integrity of aquatic ecosystems is currently jeopardized by human activities, and landscape conversion led to the decline of fish populations in several part of Sundaland, particularly in Java. The inventory of the Javanese ichthyofauna has been discontinuous, and the taxonomic knowledge is scattered in the literature. This study provides a DNA barcode reference library for the inland...

Data from: Genetic diversification and dispersal of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Hana Chaïr, Renan E. Traore, Marie France Duval, Ronan Rivallan, Archana Mukherjee, Lawrence M. Aboagye, Willem J. Van Rensburg, Voahangy Andrianavalona, Miguel A.A. Pinheiro De Carvalho, Francisco Saborio, Made Sri Prana, Birte Komolong, Floriane Lawac & Vincent Lebot
Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) is widely distributed in tropical and sub-tropical areas. However, its origin, diversification and dispersal remain unclear. While taro genetic diversity has been documented at the country and regional levels in Asia and the Pacific, few reports are available from Americas and Africa where it has been introduced through human migrations. We used eleven microsatellite markers to investigate the diversity and diversification of taro accessions from nineteen countries in Asia, the...

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Affiliations

  • Indonesian Institute of Sciences
    37
  • University of California, Berkeley
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  • Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig
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  • National Museum of Natural History
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