4 Works

Data from: Broodstock history strongly influences natural spawning success in hatchery steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Michael J. Ford, Andrew R. Murdoch, Michael J. Hughes, Todd R. Seamons, Eric LaHood, Eric S. LaHood & Michael S. Hughes
We used genetic parentage analysis of 6200 potential parents and 5497 juvenile offspring to evaluate the relative reproductive success of hatchery and natural steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss) when spawning in the wild between 2008 and 2011 in the Wenatchee River, Washington. Hatchery fish originating from two prior generation hatchery parents had <20% of the reproductive success of natural origin spawners. In contrast, hatchery females originating from a cross between two natural origin parents of the prior...

Data from: Forty years of seagrass population stability and resilience in an urbanizing estuary

Andrew Olaf Shelton, Tessa B. Francis, Blake E. Feist, Gregory D. Williams, Adam Lindquist, Phillip S. Levin & Philip S. Levin
Coasts and estuaries contain among the most productive and ecologically important habitats in the world and face intense pressure from current and projected human activities, including coastal development. Seagrasses are a key habitat feature in many estuaries perceived to be in widespread decline owing to human actions. We use spatio-temporal models and a 41-year time series from 100s of km of shoreline which includes over 160 000 observations from Puget Sound, Washington, USA, to examine...

Data from: Landscape genetics of the nonnative red fox of California

Benjamin N. Sacks, Jennifer L. Brazeal, Jefferey C. Lewis & Jeffrey C. Lewis
Invasive mammalian carnivores contribute disproportionately to declines in global biodiversity. In California, nonnative red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) have significantly impacted endangered ground-nesting birds and native canids. These foxes derive primarily from captive-reared animals associated with the fur-farming industry. Over the past five decades, the cumulative area occupied by nonnative red fox increased to cover much of central and southern California. We used a landscape-genetic approach involving mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences and 13 microsatellites of 402...

Data from: Forest cover mediates genetic connectivity of northwestern cougars

Matthew J. Warren, David O. Wallin, Richard A. Beausoleil & Kenneth I. Warheit
Population structure, connectivity, and dispersal success of individuals can be challenging to demonstrate for solitary carnivores with low population densities. Though the cougar (Puma concolor) is widely distributed throughout North America and is capable of dispersing long distances, populations can be geographically structured and genetic isolation has been documented in some small populations. We described genetic structure and explored the relationship between landscape resistance and genetic variation in cougars in Washington and southern British Columbia...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
    4
  • Northwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
    1
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    1
  • University of California, Davis
    1
  • Western Washington University
    1