7 Works

Data from: In-kennel behavior predicts length of stay in shelter dogs

Alexandra Protopopova, Lindsay Renee Mehrkam, May Meredith Boggess & Clive David Lawrence Wynne
Previous empirical evaluations of training programs aimed at improving dog adoption rates assume that dogs exhibiting certain behaviors are more adoptable. However, no systematic data are available to indicate that the spontaneous behavior of shelter dogs has an effect on adopter preference. The aim of the present study was to determine whether any behaviors that dogs exhibit spontaneously in the presence of potential adopters were associated with the dogs' length of stay in the shelter....

Data from: Intergenerational trade-off for water may induce a mother-offspring conflict in favour of embryos in a viviparous snake

Andréaz Dupoué, François Brischoux, Frédéric Angelier, Dale F. DeNardo, Christian D. Wright & Olivier Lourdais
Parent-offspring conflicts are likely to occur when resources are limiting either at pre- or postnatal stages due to intergenerational trade-offs over resources. Current theory posits that such conflicts may influence the evolution of parental allocation as well as reproductive modes. While energy allocation to the offspring has received considerable attention, the distribution of water – another potentially limited vital resource to both the mother and offspring – and the resulting outcomes remain grossly understudied. Here,...

Data from: \"Comparative genomic resources for spiny lizards (genus Sceloporus)\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 August 2014-30 September 2014

Rebecca B. Harris & Adam D. Leaché
To advance comparative genomic studies of the spiny fence lizards (genus Sceloprous), we provide the genomic annotations for 35 Sceloporus species.

Data from: Genetic architecture of a hormonal response to gene knockdown in honey bees

Kate E. Ihle, Olav Rueppell, Ying Wang, M. Kim Fondrk, , Gro V. Amdam & Zachary Y. Huang
Variation in endocrine signaling is proposed to underlie the evolution and regulation of social life histories, but the genetic architecture of endocrine signaling is still poorly understood. An excellent example of a hormonally influenced set of social traits is found in the honey bee (Apis mellifera): a dynamic and mutually suppressive relationship between juvenile hormone (JH) and the yolk precursor protein vitellogenin (Vg) regulates behavioral maturation and foraging of workers. Several other traits cosegregate with...

Data from: Influence of introgression and geological processes on phylogenetic relationships of western North American mountain suckers (Pantosteus, Catostomidae)

Peter J. Unmack, Thomas E. Dowling, Nina J. Laitinen, Carol L. Secor, Richard L. Mayden, Dennis K. Shiozawa & Gerald R. Smith
Intense geological activity caused major topographic changes in Western North America over the past 15 million years. Major rivers here are composites of different ancient rivers, resulting in isolation and mixing episodes between river basins over time. This history influenced the diversification of most of the aquatic fauna. The genus Pantosteus is one of several clades centered in this tectonically active region. The eight recognized Pantosteus species are widespread and common across southwestern Canada, western...

Data from: Sexually coercive male chimpanzees sire more offspring

Joseph T. Feldblum, Emily E. Wroblewski, Rebecca S. Rudicell, Beatrice H. Hahn, Thais Paiva, Mine Cetinkaya-Rundel, Anne E. Pusey & Ian C. Gilby
In sexually reproducing animals, male and female reproductive strategies often conflict. In some species, males use aggression to overcome female choice, but debate persists over the extent to which this strategy is successful. Previous studies of male aggression toward females among wild chimpanzees have yielded contradictory results about the relationship between aggression and mating behavior. Critically, however, copulation frequency in primates is not always predictive of reproductive success. We analyzed a 17-year sample of behavioral...

Data from: Climate change will increase savannas at the expense of forests and treeless vegetation in tropical and subtropical Americas

José D. Anadon, Osvaldo E. Sala & Fernando T. Maestre
1. Transition areas between biomes are particularly sensitive to environmental changes. Our understanding of the impacts of ongoing climate change on terrestrial ecosystems has significantly increased during the last years. However, it is largely unknown how climatic change will affect transitions among major vegetation types. 2. We modelled the distribution of three alternative states (forest, savanna and treeless areas) in the tropical and subtropical Americas by means of climate-niche modelling. We studied how such distribution...

Registration Year

  • 2014
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Arizona State University
    7
  • National Evolutionary Synthesis Center
    1
  • City University of New York
    1
  • University of Pennsylvania
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of Newcastle Australia
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    1
  • Wayne State University
    1