292 Works

GENDER WAGE AND EQUALITY AND INVESTMENTS IN CARE: MODELING EQUITY AND PRODUCTION

Elissa Braunstein & Daniele Taviani

Effects of enhanced productivity of resources shared by predators in a food-web module: Comparing results of a field experiment to predictions of mathematical models of intra-guild predation

David Wise & Monica Farfan
This dataset contains data from a field experiment described in the publication “Wise, D. H. & Farfan, M.A. (2021) Effects of enhanced productivity of resources shared by predators in a food-web module: Comparing results of a field experiment to predictions of mathematical models of intra-guild predation. Ecology and Evolution, 00: 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.8375”. The field experiment compared the response to increased input of nutrients and energy (artificial detritus) to an empirical model of intra-guild predation (IGP)...

Elephant agricultural use metrics in Mara-Serengeti ecosystem

Nathan Hahn
Agricultural use metrics were calculated for 66 elephants as part of a study to characterize crop use tactics in the Mara-Serengeti ecosystem in Kenya and Tanzania. Metrics were calculated to capture mean agricultural use, maximum use from a moving average, and the difference between mean and max use. These metrics were used to classify agricultural use tactics for each elephant using Gaussian mixture models. Tables are provided with metrics and tactic classifications for the lifetime...

Landscape genomics of the streamside salamander: Implications for species management in the face of environmental change

Marc Beer, Rachael Kane, Steven Micheletti, Christopher Kozakiewicz & Andrew Storfer
Understanding spatial patterns of genetic differentiation and local adaptation is critical in a period of rapid environmental change. Climate change and anthropogenic development have led to population declines and shifting geographic distributions in numerous species. The streamside salamander, Ambystoma barbouri, is an endemic amphibian with a small geographic range that predominantly inhabits small, ephemeral streams. As A. barbouri is listed as near-threatened by the IUCN, we describe range-wide patterns of genetic differentiation and adaptation to...

Dataset associated with Long-Term Effects of Fuel Reduction Treatments on Surface Fuel Loading in the Blue Mountains of Oregon

Kat Morici
Dataset contains a 2015 partial re-measurement of the Blue Mountains Fire and Fire Surrogate study. 8 plots were measured from each of the 16 units, selected randomly from all plots in each unit. Species are recorded using USDA plant codes, "UNKN" is unknown species. For fine fuels, 3 Brown's transects were collected per plot. The length varied based on fuel size class. The "hr1/hr10/hr100" columns include the count of fuel particles within each size class...

Directional selection shifts trait distributions of planted species in dryland restoration

Kathleen Balazs, Seth Munson, Caroline A. Havrilla & Brad Butterfield
1. The match between species trait values and local abiotic filters can restrict community membership. An often-implicit assumption of this relationship is that abiotic filters select for a single locally optimal strategy, though difficulty in isolating effects of the abiotic environment from those of dispersal limitation and biotic interactions has resulted in few empirical tests of this assumption. Similar constraints have made it difficult to assess whether the type and intensity of abiotic filters shift...

Data from \"Quantification of major particulate matter species from a single filter type using infrared spectroscopy – Application to a large-scale monitoring network\"

Ann Dillner, Bruno Debus, Andrew T. Weakley, Satoshi Takahama, Kathryn George, Bret Schichtel, Scott Copeland & Anthony Wexler
This data set contains FT-IR data obtained from spectra of PTFE filters routinely in IMPROVE network during the time period 2015-2017, as well as the corresponding routine IMPROVE data for all ( ~160) IMPROVE sites except Korea. The data include PM2.5 aerosol concentrations measurements for organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), total carbon (TC), sulfate, nitrate, silicon, aluminum, calcium, titanium, iron, mass and light absorption. The data are in ug/m3. Some samples are excluded based...

Data from: Intransitive competition is common across five major taxonomic groups and is driven by productivity, competitive rank and functional traits.

Santiago Soliveres, Anika Lehmann, Steffen Boch, Florian Altermatt, Francesco Carrara, Thomas W. Crowther, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Anne Kempel, Daniel S. Maynard, Matthias C. Rillig, Brajesh K. Singh, Pankaj Trivedi & Eric Allan
1. Competition can be fully hierarchical or intransitive, and this degree of hierarchy is driven by multiple factors, including environmental conditions, the functional traits of the species involved or the topology of competition networks. Studies simultaneously analyzing these drivers of competition hierarchy are rare. Additionally, organisms compete either directly or via interference competition for resources or space, within a local neighbourhood or across the habitat. Therefore, the drivers of competition could change accordingly and depend...

Data from: Blood mercury levels of zebra finches are heritable: implications for the evolution of mercury resistance

Kenton A. Buck, Claire W. Varian-Ramos, Daniel A. Cristol & John P. Swaddle
Mercury is a ubiquitous metal contaminant that negatively impacts reproduction of wildlife and has many other sub-lethal effects. Songbirds are sensitive bioindicators of mercury toxicity and may suffer population declines as a result of mercury pollution. Current predictions of mercury accumulation and biomagnification often overlook possible genetic variation in mercury uptake and elimination within species and the potential for evolution in affected populations. We conducted a study of dietary mercury exposure in a model songbird...

Data from: Partial support for the central–marginal hypothesis within a population: reduced genetic diversity but not increased differentiation at the range edge of an island endemic bird

Kathryn M. Langin, T. Scott Sillett, W. Chris Funk, Scott A. Morrison & Cameron K. Ghalambor
Large-scale population comparisons have contributed to our understanding of the evolution of geographic range limits and species boundaries, as well as the conservation value of populations at range margins. The central–marginal hypothesis (CMH) predicts a decline in genetic diversity and an increase in genetic differentiation toward the periphery of species’ ranges due to spatial variation in genetic drift and gene flow. Empirical studies on a diverse array of taxa have demonstrated support for the CMH....

Data from: Interactions among herbivory, climate, topography, and plant age shape riparian willow dynamics in northern Yellowstone National Park, USA

Kristin N. Marshall, David J. Cooper & N. Thompson Hobbs
Understanding how the environmental context modifies the strength of trophic interactions within food webs forms a central challenge in community ecology. Here, we demonstrate the necessity of considering the influence of climate, landscape heterogeneity and demographics for understanding trophic interactions in a well-studied food web in Yellowstone National Park, USA. We studied riparian willow (Salix spp.) establishment and stem growth reconstructed from tree rings on the northern range of Yellowstone over a 30-year period that...

Data from: Female preference for novel males constrains contemporary evolution of assortative mating in guppies

Felipe Dargent, Lisa Chen, Gregor F. Fussmann, Cameron K. Ghalambor & Andrew P. Hendry
Progress toward local adaptation is expected to be enhanced when divergent selection is multi-dimensional, because many simultaneous sources of selection can increase the total strength of selection and enhance the number of independent traits under selection. Yet, whether local adaptation ensues from multi-dimensional selection also depends on its potential to cause the build-up of reproductive barriers such as sexual signals and preference for these signals. We used replicate experimental introductions of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in...

Data from: Nonselective bottlenecks control the divergence and diversification of phase-variable bacterial populations

Jack Aidley, Shweta Rajopadhye, Nwanekka M. Akinyemi, Lea Lango-Scholey & Christopher D. Bayliss
Phase variation occurs in many pathogenic and commensal bacteria and is a major generator of genetic variability. A putative advantage of phase variation is to counter reductions in variability imposed by nonselective bottlenecks during transmission. Genomes of Campylobacter jejuni, a widespread food-borne pathogen, contain multiple phase-variable loci whose rapid, stochastic variation is generated by hypermutable simple sequence repeat tracts. These loci can occupy a vast number of combinatorial expression states (phasotypes) enabling populations to rapidly...

Data from: Precipitation and environmental constraints on three aspects of flowering in three dominant tallgrass species

Nathan P. Lemoine, John D. Dietrich & Melinda D. Smith
Flower production can comprise up to 70% of aboveground primary production in grasslands. Yet we know relatively little about how the environment and timing of rainfall determine flower productivity. Evidence suggests that deficits or additions of rainfall during phenlologically relevant periods (i.e. growth, storage, initiation of flowering, and reproduction) can determine flower production in grasslands. We used long-term data from the Konza Prairie LTER to test how fire, soil topography, and precipitation amounts during four...

Data from: Factors influencing ocelot occupancy in Brazilian Atlantic Forest reserves

Rodrigo Lima Massara, Ana Maria De Oliveira Paschoal, Larissa Lynn Bailey, , André Hirsch, Adriano Garcia Chiarello & Paul F. Doherty
Over 80% of Atlantic Forest remnants are <50 ha and protected areas are embedded in a matrix dominated by human activities, undermining the long-term persistence of carnivores. The ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) is an opportunistic species, but little is known about its tolerance to habitat alterations and the influence of other species on its occupancy in Atlantic Forest remnants. We used camera traps to assess ocelot occupancy in protected areas of Atlantic Forest in southeastern Brazil....

Data from: Simulating the distribution of individual livestock farms and their populations in the united states: an example using domestic swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) farms

Christopher L. Burdett, Brian R. Kraus, Sarah J. Garza, Ryan S. Miller & Kathe E. Bjork
Livestock distribution in the United States (U.S.) can only be mapped at a county-level or worse resolution. We developed a spatial microsimulation model called the Farm Location and Agricultural Production Simulator (FLAPS) that simulated the distribution and populations of individual livestock farms throughout the conterminous U.S. Using domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus) as an example species, we customized iterative proportional-fitting algorithms for the hierarchical structure of the U.S. Census of Agriculture and imputed unpublished state-...

Data from: Deterministic and stochastic processes lead to divergence in plant communities 25 years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires

William H. Romme, Timothy G. Whitby, Daniel B. Tinker & Monica G. Turner
Young, recently burned forests are increasingly widespread throughout western North America, but forest development after large wildfires is not fully understood, especially regarding effects of variable burn severity, environmental heterogeneity, and changes in drivers over time. We followed development of subalpine forests after the 1988 Yellowstone fires by periodically re-sampling permanent plots established soon after the fires. We asked two questions about patterns and processes over the past 25 years: (1) Are plant species richness...

Data from: De novo genome assembly of Geosmithia morbida, the causal agent of thousand cankers disease

Taruna A. Schuelke, Anthony Westbrook, Kirk Broders, Keith Woeste & Matthew D. MacManes
Geosmithia morbida is a filamentous ascomycete that causes thousand cankers disease in the eastern black walnut tree. This pathogen is commonly found in the western U.S.; however, recently the disease was also detected in several eastern states where the black walnut lumber industry is concentrated. G. morbida is one of two known phytopathogens within the genus Geosmithia, and it is vectored into the host tree via the walnut twig beetle. We present the first de...

Data from: Modeling multi-species and multi-mode contact networks: implications for persistence of bovine tuberculosis at the wildlife-livestock interface

Mark Q. Wilber, Kim M. Pepin, , Scott E. Hygnstrom, Michael J. Lavelle, Tatiana Xifara, Kurt C. Vercauteren & Coleen T. Webb
1. Individual- and species-level heterogeneity in contact rates can alter the ability of a pathogen to invade a host community. Many pathogens have multiple modes of transmission -- by direct or indirect contact. It is important to identify the role of heterogeneity in different types of transmission when managing the risk of disease spillover at the interface among different host species. 2. We developed a network-based analysis to explore how individual- and species-level heterogeneity shape...

Data from: The importance of growing up: juvenile environment influences dispersal of individuals and their neighbours

Stacy B. Endriss, Megan L. Vahsen, Ellyn V. Bitume, J. Grey Monroe, Kathryn G. Turner, Andrew P. Norton & Ruth A. Hufbauer
Dispersal is a key ecological process that is strongly influenced by both phenotype and environment. Here, we show that juvenile environment influences dispersal not only by shaping individual phenotypes, but also by changing the phenotypes of neighbouring conspecifics, which influence how individuals disperse. We used a model system (Tribolium castaneum, red flour beetles) to test how the past environment of dispersing individuals and their neighbours influences how they disperse in their current environment. We found...

Data from: Current approaches using genetic distances produce poor estimates of landscape resistance to interindividual dispersal

Tabitha A. Graves, Paul Beier & Jeffrey Andrew Royle
Landscape resistance reflects how difficult it is for genes to move across an area with particular attributes (e.g., land cover, slope). An increasingly popular approach to estimate resistance uses Mantel and partial Mantel tests or causal modeling to relate observed genetic distances to effective distances under alternative sets of resistance parameters. Relatively few alternative sets of resistance parameters are tested, leading to relatively poor coverage of the parameter space. Although this approach does not explicitly...

Data from: A hybrid phylogenetic–phylogenomic approach for species tree estimation in African Agama lizards with applications to biogeography, character evolution, and diversification

Adam D. Leaché, Philipp Wagner, Charles W. Linkem, Wolfgang Böhme, Theodore J. Papenfuss, Rebecca A. Chong, Brian R. Lavin, Aaron M. Bauer, Stuart V. Nielsen, Eli Greenbaum, Mark-Oliver Rödel, Andreas Schmitz, Matthew LeBreton, Ivan Ineich, Laurent Chirio, Caleb Ofori-Boateng, Edem A. Eniang, Sherif Baha El Din, Alan R. Lemmon & Frank T. Burbrink
Africa is renowned for its biodiversity and endemicity, yet little is known about the factors shaping them across the continent. African Agama lizards (45 species) have a pan-continental distribution, making them an ideal model for investigating biogeography. Many species have evolved conspicuous sexually dimorphic traits, including extravagant breeding coloration in adult males, large adult male body sizes, and variability in social systems among colorful versus drab species. We present a comprehensive time-calibrated species tree for...

Data from: Balancing selection maintains sex determining alleles in multiple-locus complementary sex determination

Jerome J. Weis, Paul J. Ode & George E. Heimpel
Hymenopteran species in which sex is determined through a haplo-diploid mechanism known as complementary sex determination (CSD) are vulnerable to a unique form of inbreeding depression. Diploids heterozygous at one or more CSD loci develop into females but diploids homozygous at all loci develop into diploid males, which are generally sterile or inviable. Species with multiple polymorphic CSD loci (ml-CSD) may have lower rates of diploid male production than species with a single CSD locus...

Data from: Gene expression differs in codominant prairie grasses under drought

Ava M. Hoffman & Melinda D. Smith
Grasslands of the Central US are expected to experience severe droughts and other climate extremes in the future, yet we know little about how these grasses will respond in terms of gene expression. We compared gene expression in Andropogon gerardii and Sorghastrum nutans, two closely related co-dominant C4 grasses responsible for the majority of ecosystem function, using RNA-seq. We compared Trinity assemblies within each species to determine annotated functions of transcripts responding to drought. Subsequently,...

Data from: Cryptic species diversity reveals biogeographic support for the ‘mountain passes are higher in the tropics’ hypothesis

Brian A. Gill, B. C. Kondratieff, K. L. Casner, A. C. Encalada, A. S. Flecker, D. G. Gannon, C. K. Ghalambor, J. M. Guayasamin, N. L. Poff, M. P. Simmons, S. A. Thomas, K. R. Zamudio & W. C. Funk
The ‘mountain passes are higher in the tropics’ (MPHT) hypothesis posits that reduced climate variability at low latitudes should select for narrower thermal tolerances, lower dispersal and smaller elevational ranges compared with higher latitudes. These latitudinal differences could increase species richness at low latitudes, but that increase may be largely cryptic, because physiological and dispersal traits isolating populations might not correspond to morphological differences. Yet previous tests of the MPHT hypothesis have not addressed cryptic...

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