42 Works

Data from: Environmental change, if unaccounted, prevents detection of cryptic evolution in a wild population

Tomos Potter, Ronald D. Bassar, Paul Bentzen, Emily W. Ruell, Julián Torres-Dowdall, Corey A. Handelsman, Cameron K. Ghalambor, Joseph Travis, David N. Reznick & Tim Coulson
Detecting contemporary evolution requires demonstrating that genetic change has occurred. Mixed-effects models allow estimation of quantitative genetic parameters and are widely used to study evolution in wild populations. However, predictions of evolution based on these parameters frequently fail to match observations. Furthermore, such studies often lack an independent measure of evolutionary change against which to verify predictions. Here, we applied three commonly used quantitative genetic approaches to predict the evolution of size at maturity in...

Data from: Magnitude and direction of stream-forest community interactions change with time scale

Amy Marcarelli, Colden Baxter, Joseph Benjamin, Yo Miyake, Masashi Murakami, Kurt Fausch & Shigeru Nakano
Networks of direct and indirect biotic interactions underpin the complex dynamics and stability of ecological systems, yet experimental and theoretical studies often yield conflicting evidence regarding the direction (positive or negative) or magnitude of these interactions. We revisited pioneering datasets collected at the deciduous forested Horonai Stream and conducted ecosystem-level syntheses to demonstrate that the direction of direct and indirect interactions can change depending on the timescale of observation. Prior experimental studies showed that terrestrial...

Mountain goat molt from community photographs

Katarzyna Nowak, Shane Richards, Joel Berger, Amy Panikowski, Aerin Jacob, Donald Reid, Greg Newman, Nicholas Young & Jon Beckmann
Participatory approaches, such as community photography, can engage the public in questions of societal and scientific interest while helping advance understanding of ecological patterns and processes. We combined data extracted from community-sourced, spatially-explicit photographs with research findings from 2018 fieldwork in the Yukon, Canada, to evaluate winter coat molt patterns and phenology in mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), a cold-adapted, alpine mammal. Leveraging the community science portals iNaturalist and CitSci, in less than a year we...

Data from: A trait-based approach to assessing resistance and resilience to wildfire in two iconic North American conifers

Kyle Rodman, Thomas Veblen, Robert Andrus, Neil Enright, Joseph Fontaine, Angela Gonzalez, Miranda Redmond & Andreas Wion
Ongoing changes in fire activity have the potential to drive widespread shifts in Earth’s vegetation. Plant traits and vital rates can be indicators of the ability of individuals to survive fire (resistance) and populations to persist (resilience) following fire and provide a method to assess vulnerability to fire-driven vegetation shifts. In 15 study sites spanning climatic gradients in the southern Rocky Mountains, U.S.A., we quantified variation in key traits and vital rates of two co-occurring,...

A dicamba resistance endowing IAA16 mutation leads to significant vegetative growth defects and impaired competitiveness in kochia (Bassia scoparia)

Chenxi Wu, Sherry LeClere, Kang Liu, Marta Paciorek, Alejandro Perez-Jones, Phil Westra & Douglas Sammons
Precise quantification of the fitness cost of synthetic auxins resistance has been impeded by lack of knowledge for the genetic basis of resistance in weeds. Recent elucidation of a resistance endowing IAA16 mutation (G73N) in a key weed species kochia (Bassia scoparia), allows detailed characterization of the contribution of resistance alleles to weed fitness, both in the presence and absence of herbicides. Different G73N genotypes from a segregating resistant parental line (9425) were characterized for...

The island biogeography of the eBird citizen-science program

Frank La Sorte & Marius Somveille
Aim: Island biotas face an array of unique challenges under global change. Monitoring and research efforts, however, have been hindered by the large number of islands, their broad distribution and geographic isolation. Global citizen-science initiatives have the potential to address these deficiencies. Here, we determine how the eBird citizen-science program is currently sampling island bird assemblages annually and how these patterns are developing over time. Location: Global. Taxa: Birds. Methods: We compiled occurrence information of...

Pronghorn population genomics show connectivity at the core of their range

Melanie E.F. LaCava, Roderick B. Gagne, Sierra M. Love Stowell, Kyle D. Gustafson, C. Alex Buerkle, Lee Knox & Holly B. Ernest
Preserving connectivity in the core of a species’ range is crucial for long-term persistence. However, a combination of ecological characteristics, social behavior, and landscape features can reduce connectivity among wildlife populations and lead to genetic structure. Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), for example, exhibit fluctuating herd dynamics and variable seasonal migration strategies, but GPS-tracking studies show that landscape features such as highways impede their movements, leading to conflicting hypotheses about expected levels of genetic structure. Given that...

Evaluation of the Impacts of Radio-Marking Devices on Feral Horses and Burros in a Captive Setting

Kathryn A. Schoenecker, Sarah R. B. King & Gail H. Collins
Radio-collars and other radio-marking devices have been invaluable tools for wildlife managers for >40 years. These marking devices have improved our understanding of wildlife spatial ecology and demographic parameters and provided new data facilitating model development for species conservation and management. Although these tools have been used on virtually all North American ungulates, their deployment on feral horses (Equus ferus caballus) or burros (E. asinus) has been limited. To determine if radio-collars and radio-tags could...

Favorable monsoon environment over eastern Africa for subsequent tropical cyclogenesis of African easterly waves

K.M. Núñez Ocasio, A. Brammer, J.L. Evans, G.S. Young & Z.L. Moon

Data from: Metabolic rate shapes phenotypic covariance among physiological, behavioural, and life history traits in honeybees

Dhruba Naug & Stephen Mugel
Metabolic rate is often cited as the fundamental rate that determines the rate of all biological processes by shaping energetic availability for the various behavioral and life history traits that contribute to performance. It has therefore been suggested that metabolic rate drives the widely observed covariance among these different levels of phenotypic traits. However, much of the work on this topic has relied on pairwise correlational analysis, thereby leaving an important gap in our understanding...

Long-term evidence shows crop-rotation diversification increases agricultural resilience to adverse growing conditions in North America

Timothy Bowles, Maria Mooshammer, Yvonne Socolar, Franciso Calderón, Michel Cavigelli, Steve Culman, William Dean, Axel Garcia Y Garcia, Amélie Gaudin, W Scott Harkom, Michael Lehman, Shannon Osborne, G Philip Robertson, Jonathan Salerno, Marty Schmer, Jeffrey Strock, A Stuart Grandy & Craig Drury
A grand challenge facing humanity is how to produce food for a growing population in the face of a changing climate and environmental degradation. Though empirical evidence remains sparse, management strategies that increase environmental sustainability, like increasing agroecosystem diversity through crop rotations, may also increase resilience to weather extremes without sacrificing yields. We used multilevel regression analyses of long-term crop yield datasets across a continental precipitation gradient to assess how temporal crop diversification affects maize...

Gross primary production responses to warming, elevated CO2 , and irrigation: quantifying the drivers of ecosystem physiology in a semiarid grassland

Elise Pendall, Edmund M. Ryan, Kiona Ogle, Drew Peltier, David G. Williams, Anthony P. Walker, Martin G. De Kauwe, Belinda E. Medlyn, William Parton, Shinichi Asao, Bertrand Guenet, Anna B. Harper, Xingjie Lu, Kristina A. Luus, Sönke Zaehle, Shijie Shu, Christian Werner & Jianyang Xia
Determining whether the terrestrial biosphere will be a source or sink of carbon (C) under a future climate of elevated CO2 (eCO2) and warming requires accurate quantification of gross primary production (GPP), the largest flux of C in the global C cycle. We evaluated 6 years (2007–2012) of flux‐derived GPP data from the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment, situated in a grassland in Wyoming, USA. The GPP data were used to calibrate a...

Data from: Population- and species-based variation of webworm-parasitoid interactions in hogweeds (Heracelum spp.) in the Netherlands

Jeffrey Harvey, Rieta Gols & Paul Ode
In three Dutch populations of the native small hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium), and one of the invasive giant hogweed (H. mantegazzianum), interactions between a specialist herbivore, the parsnip webworm (Depressaria radiella), and its associated parasitoids were compared during a single growing season. We found plant population and/or host plant species-related differences in the abundance of moth pupae, the specialist polyembryonic endoparasitoid, Copidosoma sosares, the specialist pupal parasitoid, Barichneumon heracliana, and a potential hyperparasitoid of C. sosares,...

Data for: Environmental conditions alter behavioural organization and rhythmicity of a large Arctic ruminant across the annual cycle

Floris Van Beest, Laissa Beumer, Marianna Chimienti, Jean-Pierre Desforges, Nicholas Huffeldt, Stine Pedersen & Niels Schmidt
The existence and persistence of rhythmicity in animal activity during phases of environmental change is of interest in ecology and chronobiology. A wide diversity of biological rhythms in response to exogenous conditions and internal stimuli have been uncovered, especially for polar vertebrates. However, empirical data supporting circadian organization of large ruminating herbivores remains inconclusive. Using year-round tracking data of the largest Arctic ruminant, the muskox (Ovibos moschatus), we modelled rhythmicity as a function of behaviour...

Data from: Rapid evolution and plasticity of genitalia

E. Dale Broder, Cameron K. Ghalambor, Corey A. Handelsman, Emily W. Ruell, David N. Reznick & Lisa M. Angeloni
Genital morphology exhibits tremendous variation and is intimately linked with fitness. Sexual selection, nonmating natural selection, and neutral forces have been explored as potential drivers of genital divergence. Though less explored, genitalia may also be plastic in response to the developmental environment. In poeciliid fishes, the length of the male intromittent organ, the gonopodium, may be driven by sexual selection if longer gonopodia attract females or aid in forced copulation attempts, or by nonmating natural...

Wildland-urban interface fire dynamics simulator input files for pyric tree spatial patterning interactions in historical and contemporary mixed conifer forests, California, USA

Justin Ziegler
Tree spatial patterns in dry coniferous forests of the western US, and analogous ecosystems globally, were historically aggregated, comprising a mixture of single trees and groups of trees. Modern forests, in contrast, are generally more homogeneous and overstocked than their historical counterparts. As these modern forests lack regular fire, pattern formation and maintenance is generally attributed to fire. Accordingly, fires in modern forests may not yield historically analogous patterns. However, direct observations on how selective...

Species asynchrony stabilises productivity under extreme drought across Northern China grasslands

Taofeek O. Muraina, Chong Xu, Qiang Yu, Yadong Yang, Minghui Jing, Xiaotong Jia, , Quockhanh Dam, Alan K. Knapp, Scott L. Collins, Yiqi Luo, Wentao Luo, Xiaoan Zuo, Xiaoping Xin, Xingguo Han & Melinda D. Smith
1. Biodiversity can stabilise productivity through different mechanisms, such as asynchronous species responses to environmental variability and species stability. Global changes, like intensified drought, could negatively affect species richness, species asynchrony, and species stability, but it is unclear how changes in these mechanisms will affect stability of aboveground primary productivity (ANPP) across ecosystems. 2. We studied the effects of a 4-year extreme drought on ANPP stability and the underlying mechanisms (species richness, species asynchrony, and...

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  • Colorado State University
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