65 Works

Synthesis of Red-cockaded Woodpecker management strategies and suggestions for regional specificity in future management

Franco Gigliotti, Emily Martin & Paige Ferguson
The Red-cockaded Woodpecker ( Dryobates borealis , RCW) was listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act in 1973 due to significant population declines resulting from habitat loss and fragmentation, and the species has been intensively managed since then. We reviewed management strategies commonly used to conserve the RCW, emphasizing studies conducted after publication of the most recent Recovery Plan in 2003, to evaluate the efficacy of each strategy across the RCW’s range and identify demographic...

Resources do not limit compensatory response of a tallgrass prairie plant community to the loss of a dominant species

Francis Chaves &
The effect of species loss on ecosystem productivity is determined by both the functional contribution of the species lost, and the response of the remaining species in the community. According to the mass-ratio hypothesis, the loss of a dominant plant species, which has a larger proportionate contribution to productivity, is expected to exert an overwhelming effect on this important ecosystem function. However, via competitive release, loss of a dominant species can provide the opportunity for...

Winds aloft over three water bodies influence spring stopover distributions of migrating birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast

Hannah Clipp, Jeffrey Buler, Jaclyn Smolinsky, Kyle Horton, Andrew Farnsworth & Emily Cohen
Migrating birds contend with dynamic wind conditions that ultimately influence most aspects of their migration, from broad-scale movements to individual decisions about where to rest and refuel. We used weather surveillance radar data to measure spring stopover distributions of northward migrating birds along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast and found a strong influence of winds over non-adjacent water bodies, the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean, along with the contiguous Gulf of Mexico. Specifically, we...

Bird strikes at commercial airports explained by citizen science and weather radar data

Cecilia Nilsson, Frank La Sorte, Adriaan Dokter, Kyle Horton, Benjamin Van Doren, Jeffrey Kolodzinski, Judy Shamoun-Baranes & Andrew Farnsworth
1. Aircraft collisions with birds span the entire history of human aviation, including fatal collisions during some of the first powered human flights. Much effort has been expended to reduce such collisions, but increased knowledge about bird movements and species occurrence could dramatically improve decision support and proactive measures to reduce them. Migratory movements of birds pose a unique, often overlooked, threat to aviation that is particularly difficult for individual airports to monitor and predict:...

Probability of occurrence and phenology of pine wilt disease transmission by insect vectors in the Rocky Mountains

David Atkins, Seth Davis & Jane Stewart
1. Pine wilt disease, caused by pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; PWN), is a damaging and globally distributed insect-vectored forest pathogen. Native forest tree mortality associated with PWN is newly reported from the Front Range of Colorado, but there is no regional information on PWN frequency or biology of local insect vectors, limiting management options. 2. A sampling array was established to survey PWN in native pines (Pinus ponderosa) and longhorn beetles (Monochamus clamator & Monochamus...

Pathway enrichments from untargeted metabolomics of plasma of Peromyscus leucopus and Mus musculus with or without LPS treatment

Alan Barbour, Nurul Islam, Ana Milovic & John Belisle
Animals that are competent reservoirs of zoonotic pathogens commonly suffer little morbidity from the infections. To investigate mechanisms of this tolerance of infection, we used single-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an experimental model of inflammation and compared the responses by two rodents: Peromyscus leucopus, white-footed deermouse and reservoir for agents of Lyme disease and other zoonoses, and the house mouse Mus musculus. Four hours after injection with LPS or saline, blood, spleen and liver samples were...

Daily abundance of Dall's sheep peaks during late summer in a seasonal habitat of high-management interest

Cody E. Deane, Barrett A. Flynn, Darren L. Bruning, Greg A. Breed & Kim A. Jochum
Informing conservation and management decisions for habitats frequented by species of high management interest often face the challenge of limited resources for conducting wildlife surveys. When surveys are focused on local areas or sparsely distributed species, it may also be difficult to obtain counts sufficient for implementing abundance models that account for imperfect detection. With replicated aerial surveys collected within a 70.25 km2 portion of the Eastern Alaska Range, Alaska, USA during the summers of...

Socio-ecological drivers of public conservation voting: restoring gray wolves to Colorado, USA

Mark Ditmer, Rebecca Niemiec, George Wittemyer & Kevin Crooks
Understanding factors that influence real-world public conservation behaviors is critical for developing successful conservation policies and management actions. Citizens of Colorado, USA recently passed a ballot initiative to restore the gray wolf to its former range within the state. The >3 million votes offer an unprecedented opportunity to test factors that influenced decisions to support or oppose this conservation action. We created spatial linear regression models to assess the relationship between support for wolf restoration...

Demographic responses to climate change in a threatened Arctic species

Kylee D. Dunham, Anna M. Tucker, David N. Koons, Asheber Abebe, F. Stephen Dobson & James B. Grand
The Arctic is undergoing rapid and accelerating change in response to global warming, altering biodiversity patterns and ecosystem function across the region. For Arctic endemic species, our understanding of the consequences of such change remains limited. Spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri), a large Arctic sea duck, use remote regions in the Bering Sea, Arctic Russia, and Alaska throughout the annual cycle making it difficult to conduct comprehensive surveys or demographic studies. Listed as Threatened under the...

Channel Islands song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) landscape genomics and adaptation to climate with gene flow dataset

Maybellene Gamboa
Disentangling the effects of neutral and adaptive processes in maintaining phenotypic variation across environmental gradients is challenging in natural populations. Song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) on the California Channel Islands occupy a pronounced east-west climate gradient within a small spatial extent, providing a unique opportunity to examine the interaction of genetic isolation (gene flow) and the environment (selection) in driving variation. We used reduced representation genomic libraries to infer the role of neutral processes (drift and...

Mast seeding records in North American Pinaceae and summer temperature data (1960-2014)

Jalene LaMontagne, Miranda Redmond, Andreas Wion & David Greene
Mast seeding database compilation for conifer tree reproduction in North America (belonging to genus: Abies, Picea, Pinus, Tsuga). All data included in analyses met the criteria that they: i) had at least 6 years of mast seeding data for a species of coniferous tree in North America, ii) data were collected on a continuous scale (e.g., based on seed traps, visual cone counts, or cone scars), iii) occurred between 1960-2014, and iv) for a taxon...

The effects of ENSO and the North American monsoon on mast seeding in two Rocky Mountain conifer species

Andreas Wion, Ian Pearse, Kyle Rodman, Thomas Veblen & Miranda Redmond
We aimed to disentangle the patterns of synchronous and variable cone production (i.e., masting) and its relationship to climate in two conifer species native to dry forests of western North America. We used cone abscission scars to reconstruct ca. 15 years of recent cone production in Pinus edulis and Pinus ponderosa, and used redundancy analysis to relate time series of annual cone production to climate indices describing the North American monsoon and the El Niño...

North Pacific harbor porpoise SNP and microhaplotype genotypes, mitochondrial control region haplotype sequences

Phillip Morin, Brenna Forester, Karin Forney, Carla Crossman, Brittany Hancock-Hanser, Kelly Robertson, Lance Barrett-Lennard, Robin Baird, John Calambokidis, Pat Gearin, Bradley Hanson, Cassie Schumacher, Timothy Harkins, Michael Fontaine, Barbara Taylor & Kim Parsons
Harbor porpoises in the North Pacific are found in coastal waters from southern California to Japan, but population structure is poorly known outside of a few local areas. We used multiplexed amplicon sequencing of 292 loci and genotyped clusters of SNPs as microhaplotypes (N=271 samples) in addition to mtDNA sequence data (N=413 samples), to examine the genetic structure from samples collected along the Pacific coast and inland waterways from California to southern British Columbia. We...

Discharge and suspended sediment a paired watershed study examining the effects of contemporary forest harvesting in the Oregon Coast Range

Jeff Hatten, Catalina Segura, Kevin Bladon, Cody Hale, George G. Ice & John Stednick
Forest harvesting practices can expose mineral soils, decrease infiltration capacities of soils, disturb the stream bank and channel, and increase erosion and fine sediment supply to stream channels. To reduce nonpoint source sediment pollution associated with forest management activities and to maintain the high water quality typically provided from forests, best management practices (BMPs) were developed and implemented. The Alsea Watershed Study was an important early research site that lead to the development of contemporary...

Cameron Pass NASA SnowEx - Meadow TLS U-077 PS01 SV05

DANIEL MCGRATH & Keith Williams

An island-hopping bird reveals how founder events shape genome-wide divergence

Ashley Sendell-Price, Kristen Ruegg, Bruce Robertson & Sonya Clegg
When populations colonise new areas, both strong selection and strong drift can be experienced due to novel environments and small founding populations, respectively. Empirical studies have predominantly focused on the phenotype when assessing the role of selection, and limited neutral-loci when assessing founder-induced loss of diversity. Consequently, the extent to which processes interact to influence evolutionary trajectories is difficult to assess. Genomic-level approaches provide the opportunity to simultaneously consider these processes. Here, we examine the...

Adaptation and correlated fitness responses over two time scales in Drosophila suzukii populations evolving in different environments

Laure Olazcuaga, Julien Foucaud, Mathieu Gautier, Candice Deschamps, Anne Loiseau, Nicolas Leménager, Benoit Facon, Virginie Ravigné, Ruth A. Hufbauer, Arnaud Estoup & Nicolas O. Rode
The process of local adaptation involves differential changes in fitness over time across different environments. While experimental evolution studies have extensively tested for patterns of local adaptation at a single time point, there is relatively little research that examines fitness more than once during the time course of adaptation. We allowed replicate populations of the fruit pest Drosophila suzukii to evolve in one of eight different fruit media. After five generations, populations with the highest...

Horizontal gene transfer is the main driver of antimicrobial resistance in broiler chicks infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg

Adelumola Oladeinde, Zaid Abdo, Maximilian Press, Kimberly Cook, Nelson Cox, Benjamin Zwirzitz, Reed Woyda, Steven Lakin, , Torey Looft, Douglas Cosby, , Jean Guard, Eric Line, Michael Rothrock, Mark Berrang, Kyler Herrington, Gregory Zock, Jodie Plumblee Lawrence, Denice Cudnik, Sandra House, Kimberly Ingram, Leah Lariscy, Robert Wagner, Samuel Aggrey … & Casey Ritz
Overuse and misuse of antibiotics in clinical settings and in food production have been linked to the increased prevalence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AR). Consequently, public health and consumer concerns have resulted in a remarkable reduction in antibiotics used for food animal production. However, there are no data on the effectiveness of antibiotic removal in reducing AR shared through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). In this study, we used neonatal broiler chicks and Salmonella enterica...

Data from: Sharing detection heterogeneity information among species in community models of occupancy and abundance can strengthen inference

Thomas Riecke, Dan Gibson, Marc Kéry & Michael Schaub
1. The estimation of abundance and distribution and factors governing patterns in these parameters is central to the field of ecology. The continued development of hierarchical models that best utilize available information to inform these processes is a key goal of quantitative ecologists. However, much remains to be learned about simultaneously modeling true abundance, presence, and trajectories of ecological communities. 2. Simultaneous modeling of the population dynamics of multiple species provides an interesting mechanism to...

Predator-prey interactions of terrestrial invertebrates are determined by predator body size and species identity

Ana Miller-Ter Kuile, Austen Apigo, An Bui, Bartholomew DiFiore, Elizabeth Forbes, Michelle Lee, Devyn Orr, Daniel Preston, Rachel Behm, Taylor Bogar, Jasmine Childress, Rodolfo Dirzo, Maggie Klope, Kevin Lafferty, John McLaughlin, Marisa Morse, Carina Motta, Kevin Park, Katherine Plummer, David Weber, Ronald Young & Hillary Young
Predator-prey interactions shape ecosystem and can help maintain biodiversity. However, for many of the earth’s most biodiverse and abundant organisms, including terrestrial arthropods, these interactions are difficult or impossible to observe directly with traditional approaches. Based on previous theory, it is likely that predator-prey interactions for these organisms are shaped by a combination of predator traits, including body size and species-specific hunting strategies. In this study, we combined diet DNA metabarcoding data of 173 individual...

Landscape-scale conservation mitigates the biodiversity loss of grassland birds

David Pavlacky, Adam Green, T. Luke George, Rich Iovanna, Anne Bartuszevige, Maureen Correll, Arvind Panjabi & T. Brandt Ryder
The decline of biodiversity from anthropogenic landscape modification is among the most pressing conservation problems world-wide. In North America, long-term population declines have elevated the recovery of the grassland avifauna to among the highest conservation priorities. Because the vast majority of grasslands of the Great Plains are privately owned, the recovery of these ecosystems and bird populations within them depend on landscape-scale conservation strategies that integrate social, economic, and biodiversity objectives. The Conservation Reserve Program...

Genotyping-by-sequencing data for a Haitian sorghum breeding program

Geoffrey Morris, Terry Felderhoff, Noah Winans, Rachel Walstead, Jean Rigaud Charles, Gael Pressoir & Kebede Muleta
Rapid environmental change can lead to extinction of populations or evolutionary rescue via genetic adaptation. In the past several years, smallholder and commercial cultivation of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a global cereal and forage crop, has been threatened by a global outbreak of an aggressive new biotype of sugarcane aphid (SCA; Melanaphis sacchari). Here we characterized genomic signatures of adaptation in a Haitian sorghum breeding population, which had been recently founded from admixed global germplasm, extensively...

Data from: Infection prevalence and density of a pathogenic trematode parasite decrease with stream order along a river continuum

Landon Falke & Daniel Preston
In lotic ecosystems, the River Continuum Concept (RCC) provides a framework for understanding changes in environmental factors and free-living communities, yet how parasite populations shift along river continua remains less clear. We quantified infections by a pathogenic trematode parasite (Nanophyetus salmincola) in >14,000 host snails across 130 stream reaches spanning 165 km in the Willamette River Basin in western Oregon, USA. Environmental factors – including flow volume, temperature, benthic algae, canopy cover, woody debris, and...

A unifying framework for analyzing temporal changes in functional and taxonomic diversity along disturbance gradients

Erin Larson, N. Leroy Poff, W. Chris Funk, Rachel Harrington, Boris Kondratieff, Scott Morton & Alexander Flecker
Frameworks exclusively considering functional diversity are gaining popularity, as they complement and extend the information provided by taxonomic diversity metrics, particularly in response to disturbance. Taxonomic diversity should be included in functional diversity frameworks to uncover the functional mechanisms causing species loss following disturbance events. We present and test a predictive framework that considers temporal functional and taxonomic diversity responses along disturbance gradients. Our proposed framework allows us to test different multidimensional metrics of taxonomic...

Cameron Pass NASA SnowEx - Meadow TLS U-077 PS01 SV06

DANIEL MCGRATH & Keith Williams

Registration Year

  • 2021
    65

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    64
  • Text
    1

Affiliations

  • Colorado State University
    65
  • UNAVCO
    6
  • United States Geological Survey
    6
  • University of California, Davis
    6
  • University of Wyoming
    4
  • Stanford University
    3
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    3
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    3
  • The Nature Conservancy
    2
  • Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    2