12 Works

Data from: A phylogeny and revised classification of Squamata, including 4161 species of lizards and snakes

R. Alexander Pyron, Frank T. Burbrink & John J. Wiens
Background: The extant squamates (>9400 known species of lizards and snakes) are one of the most diverse and conspicuous radiations of terrestrial vertebrates, but no studies have attempted to reconstruct a phylogeny for the group with large-scale taxon sampling. Such an estimate is invaluable for comparative evolutionary studies, and to clarify their taxonomy. Here, we present the first large-scale phylogenetic estimate for Squamata. Results: The estimated phylogeny contains 4161 species representing all currently recognized families...

Data from: Evolution of viviparity: a phylogenetic test of the cold-climate hypothesis in Phrynosomatid lizards

Shea M. Lambert & John J. Wiens
The evolution of viviparity is a key life-history transition in vertebrates, but the selective forces favoring its evolution are not fully understood. With >100 origins of viviparity, squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are ideal for addressing this issue. Some evidence from field and laboratory studies supports the “cold-climate” hypothesis, wherein viviparity provides an advantage in cold environments by allowing mothers to maintain higher temperatures for developing embryos. Surprisingly, the cold-climate hypothesis has not been tested...

Data from: Advancing population ecology with integral projection models: a practical guide

Cory Merow, Johan P. Dalgren, C. Jessica E. Metcalf, Dylan Z. Childs, M. E. K. Evans, Eelke Jongejans, Sydne Record, Mark Rees, Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Sean M. McMahon, Margaret E.K. Evans & Johan P. Dahlgren
Integral Projection Models (IPMs) use information on how an individual's state influences its vital rates - survival, growth and reproduction - to make population projections. IPMs are constructed from regression models predicting vital rates from state variables (e.g., size or age) and covariates (e.g., environment). By combining regressions of vital rates, an IPM provides mechanistic insight into emergent ecological patterns such as population dynamics, species geographic distributions, or life history strategies. Here, we review important...

Data from: Steep clines within a highly permeable genome across a hybrid zone between two subspecies of the European rabbit

Miguel Carneiro, Stuart J. E. Baird, Sandra Afonso, Esther Ramirez, Pedro Tarroso, Henrique Teotonio, Rafael Villafuerte, Michael W. Nachman & Nuno Ferrand
Maintenance of genetic distinction in the face of gene flow is an important aspect of the speciation process. Here, we provide a detailed spatial and genetic characterization of a hybrid zone between two subspecies of the European rabbit. We examined patterns of allele frequency change for 22 markers located on the autosomes, X-chromosome, Y-chromosome, and mtDNA in 1078 individuals sampled across the hybrid zone. While some loci revealed extremely wide clines (w>=300 km) relative to...

Data from: A total evidence approach to understanding phylogenetic relationships and ecological diversity in Selaginella subg. Tetragonostachys

Nils Arrigo, James Therrien, Cajsa Lisa Anderson, Michael D. Windham, Christopher H. Haufler & Michael S. Barker
Premise of the Study: Several members of Selaginella are renowned for their ability to survive extreme drought and “resurrect” when conditions improve. Many of these belong to subgenus Tetragonostachys, a group of ∼45 species primarily found in North and Central America, with substantial diversity in the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts. We evaluated the monophyly and the age of subgenus Tetragonostachys and assess how drought tolerance contributed to the evolution of this clade. Methods: Our study...

Data from: A synchronized global sweep of the internal genes of modern avian influenza virus

Michael Worobey, Guan-Zhu Han & Andrew Rambaut
Zoonotic infectious diseases such as influenza continue to pose a grave threat to human health. However, the factors that mediate the emergence of RNA viruses such as influenza A virus (IAV) are still incompletely understood. Phylogenetic inference is crucial to reconstructing the origins and tracing the flow of IAV within and between hosts. Here we show that explicitly allowing IAV host lineages to have independent rates of molecular evolution is necessary for reliable phylogenetic inference...

Data from: Genomics of Compositae crops: reference transcriptome assemblies, and evidence of hybridization with wild relatives

Kathryn A. Hodgins, Zhao Lai, Luiz O. Oliveira, David W. Still, Moira Scascitelli, Michael S. Barker, Nolan C. Kane, Hannes Dempewolf, Alex Kozik, Richard V. Kesseli, John M. Burke, Richard W. Michelmore & Loren H. Rieseberg
Although the Compositae harbours only two major food crops, sunflower and lettuce, many other species in this family are utilized by humans and have experienced various levels of domestication. Here we have used next generation sequencing technology to develop 15 reference transcriptome assemblies for Compositae crops or their wild relatives. These data allow us to gain insight into the evolutionary and genomic consequences of plant domestication. Specifically, we performed Illumina sequencing of Cichorium endivia, Cichorium...

Data from: Task-switching costs promote the evolution of division of labor and shifts in individuality

Heather J. Goldsby, Anna Dornhaus, Benjamin Kerr & Charles Ofria
From microbes to humans, the success of many organisms is achieved by dividing tasks among specialized group members. The evolution of such division of labor strategies is an important aspect of the major transitions in evolution. As such, identifying specific evolutionary pressures that give rise to group-level division of labor has become a topic of major interest among biologists. To overcome the challenges associated with studying this topic in natural systems, we use actively evolving...

Data from: Using genomic data to revisit a classic example of reproductive character displacement in Haitian Anolis lizards

Shea M. Lambert, Anthony J. Geneva, D. Luke Mahler & Richard E. Glor
The pattern of reproductive character displacement (RCD)—in which traits associated with reproductive isolation are more different where two species occur together than where they occur in isolation—is frequently attributed to reinforcement, a process during which natural selection acting against maladaptive mating events leads to enhanced prezygotic isolation between species or incipient species. One of the first studies of RCD to include molecular genetic data was described 40 years ago in a complex of Haitian trunk...

Data from: Allometric convergence in savanna trees and implications for plant scaling models in variable ecosystems

Andrew T. Tredennick, Lisa Patrick Bentley & Niall P. Hanan
Theoretical models of allometric scaling provide frameworks for understanding and predicting how and why the morphology and function of organisms vary with scale. It remains unclear, however, if the predictions of ‘universal’ scaling models for vascular plants hold across diverse species in variable environments. Phenomena such as competition and disturbance may drive allometric scaling relationships away from theoretical predictions based on an optimized tree. Here, we use a hierarchical Bayesian approach to calculate tree-specific, species-specific,...

Data from: Ecological causes of decelerating diversification in carnivoran mammals

Antonin Machac, David Storch & John J. Wiens
Clade diversification is a central topic in macroevolutionary studies. Recently, it has been shown that diversification rates appear to decelerate over time in many clades. What causes this deceleration remains unclear, but it has been proposed that competition for limited resources between sympatric, ecologically similar species slows diversification. Employing carnivoran mammals as a model system, we test this hypothesis using a comprehensive time-calibrated phylogeny. We also explore several conceptually related explanations including limited geographic area...

Data from: Vitis phylogenomics: hybridization intensities from a SNP array outperform genotype calls

Allison J. Miller, Naim Matasci, Heidi Schwaninger, Mallikarjuna K. Aradhya, Bernard Prins, Gan-Yuan Zhong, Charles Simon, Edward S. Buckler & Sean Myles
Understanding relationships among species is a fundamental goal of evolutionary biology. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified through next generation sequencing and related technologies enable phylogeny reconstruction by providing unprecedented numbers of characters for analysis. One approach to SNP-based phylogeny reconstruction is to identify SNPs in a subset of individuals, and then to compile SNPs on an array that can be used to genotype additional samples at hundreds or thousands of sites simultaneously. Although powerful and...

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