53 Works

Data from: Experimental warming in the field delays phenology and reduces body mass and survival: implications for the persistence of a pollinator under climate change

Paul J. CaraDonna, James L. Cunningham & Amy M. Iler
1. Climate change is rapidly altering thermal environments across the globe. The effects of increased temperatures in already warm environments may be particularly strong because organisms are likely to be near their thermal safety margins, with limited tolerance to additional heat stress. 2. We conduct an in situ field experiment over two years to investigate the direct effects of temperature on an early-season solitary bee in a warm, arid region of the Southwestern USA. Our...

Data from: Adaptive diversification of growth allometry in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana

François Vasseur, Moises Exposito-Alonso, Oscar J. Ayala-Garay, George Wang, Brian J. Enquist, Denis Vile, Cyrille Violle & Detlef Weigel
Seed plants vary tremendously in size and morphology. However, variation and covariation between plant traits may at least in part be governed by universal biophysical laws and biological constants. Metabolic Scaling Theory (MST) posits that whole-organismal metabolism and growth rate are under stabilizing selection that minimizes the scaling of hydrodynamic resistance and maximizes the scaling of resource uptake. This constrains variation in physiological traits and in the rate of biomass accumulation, so that they can...

Data from: Bison body size and climate change

Jeff M. Martin, Jim I. Mead & Perry S. Barboza
The relationship between body size and temperature of mammals is poorly resolved, especially for large keystone species such as bison (Bison bison). Bison are well-represented in the fossil record across North America, which provides an opportunity to relate body size to climate within a species. We measured the length of a leg bone (calcaneal tuber, DstL) in 849 specimens from 60 localities that were dated by stratigraphy and 14C decay. We estimated body mass (M)...

Data from: Controls on yardang development and morphology II. Numerical modeling

Jon D. Pelletier
Here I present a set of mathematical modeling results, constrained by the results of the companion paper, aimed at improving our understanding of yardang development and controls on yardang morphology. The classic model for yardang development posits that yardangs evolve to an aspect ratio of ≈ 4 in order to minimize aerodynamic drag. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model results presented here, however, demonstrate that yardangs with an aspect ratio of 4 do not minimize drag....

Data from: Genetic control of seed shattering during African rice domestication

Shuwei Lv, Wenguang Wu, Muhua Wang, Rachel S. Meyer, Marie-Noelle Ndjiondjop, Lubin Tan, Haiying Zhou, Jianwei Zhang, Yongcai Fu, Hongwei Cai, Chuanqing Sun, Rod A. Wing & Zuofeng Zhu
Domestication represents a unique opportunity to study the evolutionary process. The elimination of seed dispersal traits was a key step in the evolution of cereal crops under domestication. Here, we show that ObSH3, a YABBY transcription factor, is required for the development of the seed abscission layer. Moreover, selecting a genomic segment deletion containing SH3 resulted in the loss of seed dispersal in populations of African cultivated rice (Oryza glaberrima Steud.). Functional characterization of SH3...

Data from: Dispersal is associated with morphological innovation, but not increased diversification, in Cyphostemma (Vitaceae)

David J. Hearn, Margaret Evans, Ben Wolf, Michael McGinty & Jun Wen
Multiple processes - including dispersal, morphological innovation, and habitat change - are frequently cited as catalysts for increased diversification. We investigate these processes and the causal linkages among them in the genus Cyphostemma (Vitaceae), a clade comprising ~200 species that is unique in the Vitaceae for its diversity of growth habits. We reconstruct time-calibrated evolutionary relationships among 64 species in the genus using five nuclear and chloroplast markers, and infer the group’s morphological and biogeographic...

Data from: Testing the role of climate in speciation: new methods and applications to squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes)

Tereza Jezkova & John J. Wiens
Climate may play important roles in speciation, such as causing the range fragmentation that underlies allopatric speciation (through niche conservatism) or driving divergence of parapatric populations along climatic gradients (through niche divergence). Here, we developed new methods to test the frequency of climate niche conservatism and divergence in speciation, and applied it to species pairs of squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes). We used a large-scale phylogeny to identify 242 sister-species pairs for analysis. From these,...

Data from: Potential limits to the benefits of admixture during biological invasion

Brittany S. Barker, Janelle E. Cocio, Samantha R. Anderson, Joseph E. Braasch, F. Alice Cang, Heather D. Gillette & Katrina M. Dlugosch
Species introductions often bring together genetically divergent source populations, resulting in genetic admixture. This geographic reshuffling of diversity has the potential to generate favorable new genetic combinations, facilitating the establishment and invasive spread of introduced populations. Observational support for the superior performance of admixed introductions has been mixed, however, and the broad importance of admixture to invasion questioned. Under most underlying mechanisms, admixture’s benefits should be expected to increase with greater divergence among and lower...

Data from: A continent-scale test of multiple hypotheses on the abundances of Neotropical birds

David W. Kikuchi, Gustavo H. Kattan & Kimberly C. Navarro Velez
Explaining variation in the abundance of species remains a challenge in ecology. We sought to explain variation in abundance of Neotropical forest birds using a dataset of population densities of 596 species. We tested a priori hypotheses for the roles of species traits, environmental factors, and species interactions. Specifically, we focused on four factors: 1) body mass (trait); 2) habitat type (environmental factor), 3) net primary productivity (NPP; environmental factor); and 4) species richness of...

PFTCourses Elevational Gradient and TransPlant Experiment, Gongga Mountain, China

Vigdis Vandvik, Aud Halbritter, Yan Yang, hai he, li zhang, alex brummer, kari klanderud, Brian Maitner, Sean Michaletz, Xiangyang Sun, Richard Telford, Genxu Wang, Inge Althuizen, Jonathan Henn, William Garcia, Ragnhild Gya, Francesca Jaroszynska, Blake Joyce, Rebecca Lehman, Michelangelo Moerland, Elisabeth Nesheim-Hauge, Linda Nordås, ahui peng, Claire Ponsac, lorah seltzer … & Brian Enquist
This project reports on plant functional traits, vegetation, ecosystem, and climate data in response to climate change experiments and along a 1000 m elevational gradient in the Gongga Mountains, Sichuan Province, China. Across four sites along the elevational gradient, we conducted whole-community TransPlant warming and cooling experiments and passive Open Top chamber (OTC) warming experiments. In these experiments we measured plant community composition and structure, plant population dynamics, plant functional traits, carbon fluxes, and climate....

Data from: Environmentally-induced noise dampens and reddens with increasing trophic level in a complex food web

Anna Kuparinen, Tommi Perälä, Neo D. Martinez & Fernanda S. Valdovinos
Stochastic variability of key abiotic factors including temperature, precipitation and the availability of light and nutrients greatly influences species’ ecological function and evolutionary fate. Despite such influence, ecologists have typically ignored the effect of abiotic stochasticity on the structure and dynamics of ecological networks. Here we help to fill that gap by advancing the theory of how abiotic stochasticity, in the form of environmental noise, affects the population dynamics of species within food webs. We...

Data from: Bringing down the house: male widow spiders reduce the webs of aggressive females more

Nicholas DiRienzo, Charles T. Bradley, Connor A. Smith & A. Dornhaus
Theory suggests that males should adjust courtship in response to a variety of factors, including female quality, the risk of male-male competition, and often in spiders, the risk of sexual cannibalism. Male black widow spiders demonstrate a behavior during courtship whereby they tear down and bundle a female’s web in addition to providing other vibratory and contact sexual signals. This web reduction has been hypothesized to play a role in all three factors (sexual signaling,...

Data from: The evolution of floral sonication, a pollen foraging behavior used by bees (Anthophila)

Sophie Cardinal, Stephen L. Buchmann & Avery Leigh Russell
Over 22,000 species of biotically pollinated flowering plants, including some major agricultural crops, depend primarily on bees capable of floral sonication for pollination services. The ability to sonicate (“buzz”) flowers is widespread in bees but not ubiquitous. Despite the prevalence of this pollinator behavior and its importance to natural and agricultural systems, the evolutionary history of floral sonication in bees has not been previously studied. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of floral sonication in...

Data from: The rice paradox: multiple origins but single domestication in Asian rice

Jae Young Choi, Adrian E Platts, Dorian Q Fuller, Yue-Ie Hsing, Rod A Wing & Michael D Purugganan
The origin of domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa) has been a contentious topic, with conflicting evidence for either single or multiple domestication of this key crop species. We examined the evolutionary history of domesticated rice by analyzing de novo assembled genomes from domesticated rice and its wild progenitors. Our results indicate multiple origins, where each domesticated rice subpopulation (japonica, indica, and aus) arose separately from progenitor O. rufipogon and/or O. nivara. Coalescence-based modeling of demographic...

Data from: Cough frequency during treatment associated with baseline cavitary volume and proximity to the airway in pulmonary TB

Alvaro Proaño, David P. Bui, José W. López, Nancy M. Vu, Marjory A. Bravard, Gwenyth O. Lee, Brian H. Tracey, Ziyue Xu, Germán Comina, Eduardo Ticona, Daniel J. Mollura, Jon S. Friedland, David A. J. Moore, Carlton A. Evans, Philip Caligiuri, Robert H. Gilman & Tuberculosis Working Group In Peru
Background: Cough frequency, and its duration, is a lab-free biomarker that can be used in low-resource settings and has been associated with transmission and treatment response. Radiological characteristics associated with increased cough frequency may be important in understanding transmission. The relationship between cough frequency and cavitary lung disease has never been studied. Methods: We analyzed 41 human immunodeficiency virus-negative adults with culture-confirmed, drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis throughout treatment. Cough recordings were based on the Cayetano Cough...

Data from: Behavioural evolution accompanying host shifts in cactophilic Drosophila larvae

Joshua M. Coleman, Kyle M. Benowitz, Alexandra G. Jost & Luciano M. Matzkin
For plant utilizing insects, the shift to a novel host is generally accompanied by a complex set of phenotypic adaptations. Many such adaptations arise in response to differences in plant chemistry, competitive environment, or abiotic conditions. One less well-understood factor in the evolution of phytophagous insects is the selective environment provided by plant shape and volume. Does the physical structure of a new plant host favour certain phenotypes? Here, we use cactophilic Drosophila, which have...

Data from: Temporal scale of environmental correlations affects ecological synchrony

Robert A. Desharnais, Daniel C. Reuman, Robert F. Costantino & Joel E. Cohen
Population densities of a species, measured in different locations are often correlated over time, a phenomenon referred to as synchrony. Synchrony results from dispersal of individuals among locations and spatially correlated environmental variation, among other causes. Synchrony is often measured by a correlation coefficient. However, synchrony can vary with timescale. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the timescale-specificity of environmental correlation affects the overall magnitude and timescale-specificity of synchrony, and that these effects are modified...

Data from: Native lagomorphs suppress grass establishment in a shrub‐encroached, semiarid grassland

Samuel T. Abercrombie, John L. Koprowski, Mary H. Nichols & Jeffrey S. Fehmi
Shrub encroachment into arid grasslands has been associated with reduced grass abundance, increased soil erosion, and local declines in biodiversity. Livestock overgrazing and the associated reduction of fine fuels has been a primary driver of shrub encroachment in the southwestern United States, but shrublands continue to persist despite livestock removal and grassland restoration efforts. We hypothesized that herbivory feedbacks from native mammals may contribute to continued suppression of grasses after the removal of livestock. Our...

Data from: Vanishing refuge? Testing the forest refuge hypothesis in coastal East Africa using genome-wide sequence data for seven amphibians

Christopher D. Barratt, Beryl A. Bwong, Robert Jehle, H. Christoph Liedtke, Peter Nagel, Renske E. Onstein, Daniel M. Portik, Jeffrey W. Streicher & Simon P. Loader
High-throughput sequencing data have greatly improved our ability to understand the processes that contribute to current biodiversity patterns. The “vanishing refuge” diversification model is speculated for the coastal forests of eastern Africa, whereby some taxa have persisted and diversified between forest refugia, while others have switched to becoming generalists also present in non-forest habitats. Complex arrangements of geographical barriers (hydrology and topography) and ecological gradients between forest and non-forest habitats may have further influenced the...

Data from: Severity of impacts of an introduced species corresponds with regional eco-evolutionary experience

Kimberley T. Davis, Ragan M. Callaway, Alex Fajardo, Anibal Pauchard, Martin A Nunez, Rob W Brooker, Bruce D. Maxwell, Romina D Dimarco, Duane A Peltzer, Bill Mason, Seppo Ruotsalainen, Anne C S McIntosh, Robin J Pakeman, Alyssa Laney Smith & Michael Gundale
Invasive plant impacts vary widely across introduced ranges. We tested the hypothesis that differences in the eco-evolutionary experience of native communities with the invader correspond with the impacts of invasive species on native vegetation, with impacts increasing with ecological novelty. We compared plant species richness and composition beneath Pinus contorta to that in adjacent vegetation and other P. contorta stands across a network of sites in its native (Canada and USA) and non-native (Argentina, Chile,...

Data from: Contemporaneous radiations of fungi and plants linked to symbiosis

François Lutzoni, Michael D. Nowak, Michael E. Alfaro, Valérie Reeb, Jolanta Miadlikowska, Michael Krug, A. Elizabeth Arnold, Louise A. Lewis, David L. Swofford, David Hibbett, Khidir Hilu, Timothy Y. James, Dietmar Quandt & Susana Magallón
Interactions between fungi and plants, including parasitism, mutualism, and saprotrophy, have been invoked as key to their respective macroevolutionary success. Here we evaluate the origins of plant-fungal symbioses and saprotrophy using a time-calibrated phylogenetic framework that reveals linked and drastic shifts in diversification rates of each kingdom. Fungal colonization of land was associated with at least two origins of terrestrial green algae and preceded embryophytes (as evidenced by losses of fungal flagellum, ca. 720 Ma),...

NICE: CROWD

Kelly Cuccolo, Jon Grahe, Martha Zlokovich, John Edlund, rick miller, Susana Gallor, Jordan Wagge, Kaitlyn Werner, Albert Ly, Fanli Jia, Robert Yockey, Christina Shane-Simpson, Jill Norvilitis, Tabea Hässler, Lisa Bauer, Mary Moussa Rogers, Cliff McKinney, Gabriela Heermans, Patricia Arriaga, Nooran Rasheed, Megan Irgens, Cory Cascalheira, Apryl Alexander, Alexander Vinogradov, Halil Emre Kocalar … & Antonios Kagialis

Data from: A spatially explicit hierarchical model to characterize population viability

Steven P. Campbell, Erin R. Zylstra, Catherine R. Darst, Roy C. Averill-Murray & Robert J. Steidl
Many of the processes that govern the viability of animal populations vary spatially, yet population viability analyses (PVAs) that account explicitly for spatial variation are rare. We develop a PVA model that incorporates autocorrelation into the analysis of local demographic information to produce spatially explicit estimates of demography and viability at relatively fine spatial scales across a large spatial extent. We use a hierarchical, spatial autoregressive model for capture-recapture data from multiple locations to obtain...

Data from: Variation in mandible development and its relationship to dependence on parents across burying beetles

Kyle M. Benowitz, Madeline E. Sparks, Elizabeth C. McKinney, Patricia J. Moore & Allen J. Moore
Background: In species with parental care, there is striking variation in offspring dependence at birth, ranging from feeding independence to complete dependency on parents for nutrition. Frequently, highly dependent offspring further evolve reductions or alterations of morphological traits that would otherwise promote self-sufficiency. Here, we examine evidence for morphological evolution associated with dependence in burying beetles (Nicrophorus spp.), in which dependence upon parents appears to have several independent origins. In many species precocial first instar...

Data from: Bio-inspired imager improves sensitivity in near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery

Missael Garcia, Christopher Edmiston, Timothy York, Radoslav Marinov, Suman Mondal, Nan Zhu, Gail P. Sudlow, Walter J. Akers, Julie Margenthaler, Samuel Achilefu, Rongguang Liang, Mohamed A. Zayed, Marta Y. Pepino & Viktor Gruev
Image-guided surgery can enhance cancer treatment by decreasing, and ideally eliminating, positive tumor margins and iatrogenic damage to healthy tissue. Current state-of-the-art near-infrared fluorescence imaging systems are bulky and costly, lack sensitivity under surgical illumination, and lack co-registration accuracy between multimodal images. As a result, an overwhelming majority of physicians still rely on their unaided eyes and palpation as the primary sensing modalities for distinguishing cancerous from healthy tissue. Here we introduce an innovative design,...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    53

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    43
  • Text
    10

Affiliations

  • University of Arizona
    53
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    5
  • Virginia Tech
    3
  • University of Sao Paulo
    3
  • University of California Los Angeles
    3
  • University of Kansas
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • National Institute for Environmental Studies
    2
  • Arizona State University
    2