14 Works

Data from: Organization of biogeochemical nitrogen pathways with switch-like adjustment in fluctuating soil redox conditions

Sanjay Lamba, Soumen Bera, Mubasher Rashid, Alexander B. Medvinsky, Gui-Quan Sun, Claudia Acquisti, Amit Chakraborty & Bai-Lian Li
Nitrogen is cycled throughout ecosystems by a suite of biogeochemical processes. The high complexity of the nitrogen cycle resides in an intricate interplay between reversible biochemical pathways alternatively and specifically activated in response to diverse environmental cues. Despite aggressive research, how the fundamental nitrogen biochemical processes are assembled and maintained in fluctuating soil redox conditions remains elusive. Here, we address this question using a kinetic modelling approach coupled with dynamical systems theory and microbial genomics....

Data from: Post-fire recovery in coastal sage scrub: seed rain and community trajectory

Erin Conlisk, Rebecca Swab, Alejandra Martínez-Berdeja & Matthew P. Daugherty
Disturbance is a primary mechanism structuring ecological communities. However, human activity has the potential to alter the frequency and intensity of natural disturbance regimes, with subsequent effects on ecosystem processes. In Southern California, human development has led to increased fire frequency close to urban areas that can form a positive feedback with invasive plant spread. Understanding how abiotic and biotic factors structure post-fire plant communities is a critical component of post-fire management and restoration. In...

Data from: Mammal madness: is the mammal tree of life not yet resolved?

Nicole M. Foley, Mark S. Springer & Emma C. Teeling
Most molecular phylogenetic studies place all placental mammals into four superordinal groups, Laurasiatheria (e.g. dogs, bats, whales), Euarchontoglires (e.g. humans, rodents, colugos), Xenarthra (e.g. armadillos, anteaters) and Afrotheria (e.g. elephants, sea cows, tenrecs), and estimate that these clades last shared a common ancestor 90–110 million years ago. This phylogeny has provided a framework for numerous functional and comparative studies. Despite the high level of congruence among most molecular studies, questions still remain regarding the position...

Data from: Ecological, evolutionary and human-mediated determinants of poeciliid species richness on Caribbean islands

Andrew I. Furness, David N. Reznick & John C. Avise
Aim: The theory of island biogeography provides a predictive framework relating species richness to island size and distance from the mainland. However, the theory as originally formulated does not necessarily scale to large islands and continental landmasses that are capable of generating species through in situ speciation (rather than entirely by colonization), nor does it necessarily account for how human introduction of species alters traditional biogeographical patterns. Here, we examine the ecological (colonization and extinction),...

Data from: Coastal landforms and accumulation of mangrove peat increase carbon sequestration and storage

Paula Ezcurra, Exequiel Ezcurra, Pedro P. Garcillán, Matthew T. Costa & Octavio Aburto-Oropeza
Given their relatively small area, mangroves and their organic sediments are of disproportionate importance to global carbon sequestration and carbon storage. Peat deposition and preservation allows some mangroves to accrete vertically and keep pace with sea-level rise by growing on their own root remains. In this study we show that mangroves in desert inlets in the coasts of the Baja California have been accumulating root peat for nearly 2,000 y and harbor a belowground carbon...

Data from: Elevation and latitude interact to drive life-history variation in precocial birds: a comparative analysis using Galliformes

Priya Balasubramaniam & John T. Rotenberry
Elevational gradients provide a powerful laboratory for understanding the environmental and ecological drivers of geographic variation in avian life-history strategies. Environmental variation across elevational gradients is hypothesized to select for a trade-off of reduced fecundity (lower clutch size and/or fewer broods) for higher offspring quality (larger eggs and/or increased parental care) in higher elevation species and populations. In birds, a focus on altricial species from north temperate latitudes has prevented an evaluation of the generality...

Data from: Direct and indirect effects of native range expansion on soil microbial community structure and function

Courtney G. Collins, Chelsea J. Carey, Emma L. Aronson, Christopher W. Kopp & Jeffrey M. Diez
Analogous to the spread of non-native species, shifts in native species’ ranges resulting from climate and land use change are also creating new combinations of species in many ecosystems. These native range shifts may be facilitated by similar mechanisms that provide advantages for non-native species and may also have comparable impacts on the ecosystems they invade. Soil biota, in particular bacteria and fungi, are important regulators of plant community composition and below-ground ecosystem function. Compared...

Data from: Metapopulation dominance and genomic-island acquisition of Bradyrhizobium with superior catabolic capabilities

Amanda C. Hollowell, John U. Regus, David Turissini, Kelsey A. Gano-Cohen, Roxanne Bantay, Andrew Bernardo, Devora Moore, Jonathan Pham & Joel L. Sachs
Root nodule forming rhizobia exhibit a bipartite lifestyle, replicating in soil and also within plant cells where they fix nitrogen for legume hosts. Host control models posit that legume hosts act as a predominant selective force on rhizobia, but few studies have examined rhizobial fitness in natural populations. Here, we genotyped and phenotyped Bradyrhizobium isolates across >800km of the native Acmispon strigosus host range. We sequenced chromosomal genes expressed under free-living conditions and accessory symbiosis...

Data from: Conditional vulnerability of plant diversity to atmospheric nitrogen deposition across the United States

Samuel M. Simkin, Edith B. Allen, William D. Bowman, Christopher M. Clark, Jayne Belnap, Matthew L. Brooks, Brian S. Cade, Scott L. Collins, Linda H. Geiser, Frank S. Gilliam, Sarah E. Jovan, Linda H. Pardo, Bethany K. Schulz, Carly J. Stevens, Katharine N. Suding, Heather L. Throop & Donald M. Waller
Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has been shown to decrease plant species richness along regional deposition gradients in Europe and in experimental manipulations. However, the general response of species richness to N deposition across different vegetation types, soil conditions, and climates remains largely unknown even though responses may be contingent on these environmental factors. We assessed the effect of N deposition on herbaceous richness for 15,136 forest, woodland, shrubland, and grassland sites across the continental United...

Data from: The effect of neighborhood size on effective population size in theory and in practice

Leonard Nunney
The distinction between the effective size of a population (Ne) and the effective size of its neighborhoods (Nn) has sometimes become blurred. Ne reflects the effect of random sampling on the genetic composition of a population of size N, whereas Nn is a measure of within-population spatial genetic structure and depends strongly on the dispersal characteristics of a species. Although Nn is independent of Ne, the reverse is not true. Using simulations of a population...

Data from: Invading Africa: a novel transoceanic dispersal by a New World ant parasitoid

Elizabeth A. Murray & John M. Heraty
Aim: An ant parasitoid wasp genus (Eucharitidae: Kapala) common in the New World exhibits the intriguing pattern of having one species distributed widely across tropical Africa and Madagascar. The unusual distribution prompted an investigation of the age, origins and diversification of the Afrotropical Kapala species. We evaluate a previous hypothesis that the species was anthropogenically introduced. Location: Africa and Madagascar and the Neotropics. Methods: Numerous forms of evidence are incorporated to explain the origin of...

Data from: Genetic structure reveals a history of multiple independent origins followed by admixture in the allopolyploid weed Salsola ryanii

Shana R. Welles & Norman C. Ellstrand
It has recently become clear that many invasive species have evolved in situ via hybridization or polyploidy from progenitors which themselves are introduced species. For species formed by hybridization or polyploidy, genetic diversity within the newly formed species is influenced by the number of independent evolutionary origins of the species. For recently formed species, an analysis of genetic structure can provide insight into the number of independent origin events involved in the formation of the...

Data from: Do thermoregulatory costs limit altitude distributions of Andean forest birds?

Gustavo A. Londono, Mark A. Chappell, Jill E. Jankowski & Scott K. Robinson
Along tropical mountains, species often occupy narrow altitude ranges. Numerous biotic and abiotic factors have been proposed as determinants of altitude occupancy. We measured several aspects of thermal physiology of 215 bird species across a 2·6-km altitude gradient in the Peruvian Andes. We predicted that highland species would show adaptation to the colder high-altitude climate and that energy costs of thermoregulation might limit upslope dispersal of lowland natives. We found reductions in thermal conductance, body...

Data from: The evolution of coexistence: reciprocal adaptation promotes the assembly of a simple community

Ronald D. Bassar, Troy Simon, William Roberts, Joseph Travis & David N. Reznick
Species coexistence may result by chance when co-occurring species do not strongly interact or it may be an evolutionary outcome of strongly interacting species adapting to each other. While patterns like character displacement indicate that coexistence has often been an evolutionary outcome, it is unclear how often the evolution of coexistence represents adaptation in only one species or reciprocal adaptation among all interacting species. Here we demonstrate a strong role for evolution in the coexistence...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of California, Riverside
    14
  • University of California System
    4
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • University of North Carolina
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    1
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    1
  • San Diego State University
    1