21 Works

Data from: Resource selection and landscape change reveal mechanisms suppressing population recovery for the world's most endangered antelope

Abdullahi H. Ali, Adam T. Ford, Jeffrey S. Evans, David P. Mallon, Matthew M. Hayes, Juliet King, Rajan Amin & Jacob R. Goheen
Understanding how bottom-up and top-down forces affect resource selection can inform restoration efforts. With a global population size of <500 individuals, the hirola Beatragus hunteri is the world's most endangered antelope, with a declining population since the 1970s. While the underlying mechanisms are unclear, some combination of habitat loss and predation are thought to be responsible for low abundances of contemporary populations. Efforts to conserve hirola are hindered by a lack of understanding as to...

Data from: Reconstructing the emergence of a lethal infectious disease of wildlife supports a key role for spread through translocations by humans

Stephen J. Price, Trenton W.J. Garner, Andrew A. Cunningham, Tom E.S. Langton & Richard A. Nichols
There have been few reconstructions of wildlife disease emergences, despite their extensive impact on biodiversity and human health. This is in large part attributable to the lack of structured and robust spatio-temporal datasets. We overcame logistical problems of obtaining suitable information by using data from a citizen science project and formulating spatio-temporal models of the spread of a wildlife pathogen (genus Ranavirus, infecting amphibians). We evaluated three main hypotheses for the rapid increase in disease...

Data from: Thyroid hormone modulates offspring sex ratio in a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination

Bao-Jun Sun, Teng Li, Yi Mu, Jessica K. McGlashan, Arthur Georges, Richard Shine & Wei-Guo Du
The adaptive significance of temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) has attracted a great deal of research, but the underlying mechanisms by which temperature determines the sex of a developing embryo remain poorly understood. Here, we manipulated the level of a thyroid hormone (TH), triiodothyronine (T3), during embryonic development (by adding excess T3 to the eggs of the red-eared slider turtle Trachemys scripta, a reptile with TSD), to test two competing hypotheses on the proximate basis for...

Data from: Evolutionarily distinct “living fossils” require both lower speciation and lower extinction rates

Dominic J. Bennett, Mark D. Sutton & Samuel T. Turvey
As a label for a distinct category of life, ‘living fossil’ is controversial. The term has multiple definitions and it is unclear whether the label can be genuinely used to delimit biodiversity. Even taking a purely phylogenetic perspective where a proxy for the living fossil is evolutionary distinctness (ED), an inconsistency arises: does it refer to “dead-end” lineages doomed to extinction or “panchronic” lineages that survive through multiple epochs? Recent tree-growth model studies indicate that...

Data from: Acoustic identification of Mexican bats based on taxonomic and ecological constraints on call design

Veronica Zamora-Gutierrez, Celia Lopez-Gonzalez, M. Cristina MacSwiney Gonzalez, Brock Fenton, Gareth Jones, Elisabeth K. V. Kalko, Sebastien J. Puechmaille, Vassilios Stathopoulos & Kate E. Jones
Monitoring global biodiversity is critical for understanding responses to anthropogenic change, but biodiversity monitoring is often biased away from tropical, megadiverse areas that are experiencing more rapid environmental change. Acoustic surveys are increasingly used to monitor biodiversity change, especially for bats as they are important indicator species and most use sound to detect, localise and classify objects. However, using bat acoustic surveys for monitoring poses several challenges, particularly in megadiverse regions. Many species lack reference...

Data from: Weak olfaction increases seed scatter-hoarding by Siberian chipmunks: implication in shaping plant-animal interactions

Xianfeng Yi, Zhenyu Wang, Hongmao Zhang & Zhibin Zhang
Scatter-hoarding of seeds by animals plays an essential role in seed dispersal of plants and in shaping plant–animal interactions in forest ecosystems, but the function of scatter-hoarding behavior is still unclear. We hypothesize that weak olfactory cues between seeds and scatter-hoarding animals would increase scatter-hoarding. Using a rodent–plant system of Siberian chipmunks Tamias sibiricus and Korean pines Pinus koraiensis, we tested the effects on seed scatter-hoarding intensity by measuring and modifying the seed odor intensities...

Data from: Assessing current genetic status of the Hainan gibbon using historical and demographic baselines: implications for conservation management of species of extreme rarity

Jessica V. Bryant, Dada Gottelli, Xinyuan Zeng, Xiaojiang Hong, Bosco P.L. Chan, John R. Fellowes, Ya-Ping Zhang, Jing Luo, Christopher Durrant, Thomas Geissmann, Helen J. Chatterjee, Samuel T. Turvey, J. V. Bryant, D. Gottelli, C. Durrant, S. T. Turvey, Y. Zhang, T. Geissmann, J. Luo, J. R. Fellowes & H. J. Chatterjee
Evidence-based conservation planning is crucial for informing management decisions for species of extreme rarity, but collection of robust data on genetic status or other parameters can be extremely challenging for such species. The Hainan gibbon, possibly the world's rarest mammal, consists of a single population of ~25 individuals restricted to one protected area on Hainan Island, China, and has persisted for over 30 years at exceptionally low population size. Analysis of genotypes at 11 microsatellite...

Data from: Segregated water observed in a putative fish embryo cryopreservative

Oleg Kirichek, Alan K. Soper, Boris Dzyuba, William V. Holt & W. V. Holt
Development of new cryopreservation strategies has major potential in medicine and agriculture and is critical to the conservation of endangered species that currently cannot be preserved. A critical property of any potential cryopreservative solution is its ability to prevent cell-damaging ice formation during cooling and subsequent heating. This study focuses on the freezing behaviour of promising model cryoprotective solutions. We perform neutron scattering analysis, combined with computer modelling, of the water structure after quench cooling...

Data from: Information use and resource competition: an integrative framework

Alexander E. G. Lee, James P. Ounsley, Timothy Coulson, J. Marcus Rowcliffe, Guy Cowlishaw & Tim Coulson
Organisms may reduce uncertainty regarding how best to exploit their environment by collecting information about resource distribution. We develop a model to demonstrate how competition can facilitate or constrain an individual’s ability to use information when acquiring resources. Since resource distribution underpins both selection on information use and the strength and nature of competition between individuals, we demonstrate interdependencies between the two that should be common in nature. Individuals in our model can search for...

Data from: Patterns of mammalian population decline inform conservation action

Martina M. I. Di Fonzo, Ben Collen, Alienor L. M. Chauvenet & Georgina M. Mace
1. Evaluations of wildlife population dynamics have the potential to convey valuable information on the type of pressure affecting a population and could help predict future changes in the population's trajectory. Greater understanding of different patterns of population declines could provide a useful mechanism for assessing decline severity in the wild and identifying those populations that are more likely to exhibit severe declines. 2. We identified 93 incidences of decline within 75 populations of mammalian...

Data from: Tree phylogenetic diversity promotes host–parasitoid interactions

Michael Staab, Helge Bruelheide, Walter Durka, Stefan Michalski, Oliver Purschke, Chao-Dong Zhu & Alexandra-Maria Klein
Evidence from grassland experiments suggests that a plant community's phylogenetic diversity (PD) is a strong predictor of ecosystem processes, even stronger than species richness per se. This has, however, never been extended to species-rich forests and host–parasitoid interactions. We used cavity-nesting Hymenoptera and their parasitoids collected in a subtropical forest as a model system to test whether hosts, parasitoids, and their interactions are influenced by tree PD and a comprehensive set of environmental variables, including...

Data from: Revealing kleptoparasitic and predatory tendencies in an African mammal community using camera traps: a comparison of spatiotemporal approaches

Jeremy J. Cusack, Amy J. Dickman, Monty Kalyahe, J. Marcus Rowcliffe, Chris Carbone, David W. Macdonald & Tim Coulson
Camera trap data are increasingly being used to characterise relationships between the spatiotemporal activity patterns of sympatric mammal species, often with a view to inferring inter-specific interactions. In this context, we attempted to characterise the kleptoparasitic and predatory tendencies of spotted hyaenas Crocuta crocuta and lions Panthera leo from photographic data collected across 54 camera trap stations and two dry seasons in Tanzania's Ruaha National Park. We applied four different methods of quantifying spatiotemporal associations,...

Data from: Islands within an island: Population genetic structure of the endemic Sardinian newt, Euproctus platycephalus

Sarah E. Ball, Stefano Bovero, Guiseppe Sotgiu, Giulia Tessa, Claudio Angelini, Jon Bielby, Chris Durrant, Marco Favelli, Enrico Gazzaniga, Trenton W. J. Garner & Christopher Durrant
The identification of historic and contemporary barriers to dispersal is central to the conservation of endangered amphibians, but may be hindered by their complex life history and elusive nature. The complementary information generated by mitochondrial (mtDNA) and microsatellite markers generates a valuable tool in elucidating population structure and the impact of habitat fragmentation. We applied this approach to the study of an endangered montane newt, Euproctus platycephalus. Endemic to the Mediterranean island of Sardinia, it...

Data from: The computer program structure for assigning individuals to populations: easy to use but easier to misuse

Jinliang Wang
The computer program Structure implements a Bayesian method, based on a population genetics model, to assign individuals to their source populations using genetic marker data. It is widely applied in the fields of ecology, evolutionary biology, human genetics and conservation biology for detecting hidden genetic structures, inferring the most likely number of populations (K), assigning individuals to source populations and estimating admixture and migration rates. Recently, several simulation studies repeatedly concluded that the program yields...

Data from: Badgers prefer cattle pasture but avoid cattle: implications for bovine tuberculosis control

Rosie Woodroffe, Christl A. Donnelly, Cally Ham, Seth Y.B. Jackson, Kelly Moyes, Kayna Chapman, Naomi G. Stratton, Samantha J. Cartwright & Seth Y. B. Jackson
Effective management of infectious disease relies upon understanding mechanisms of pathogen transmission. In particular, while models of disease dynamics usually assume transmission through direct contact, transmission through environmental contamination can cause different dynamics. We used Global Positioning System (GPS) collars and proximity-sensing contact-collars to explore opportunities for transmission of Mycobacterium bovis [causal agent of bovine tuberculosis] between cattle and badgers (Meles meles). Cattle pasture was badgers’ most preferred habitat. Nevertheless, although collared cattle spent 2914...

Data from: Climate forcing of an emerging pathogenic fungus across a montane multi-host community

Frances C. Clare, Julia B. Halder, Olivia Daniel, Jon Bielby, Mikhail A. Semenov, Thibaut Jombart, Adeline Loyau, Dirk S. Schmeller, Andrew A. Cunningham, Marcus Rowcliffe, Trenton W.J. Garner, Jaime Bosch & Matthew C. Fisher
Changes in the timings of seasonality as a result of anthropogenic climate change are predicted to occur over the coming decades. While this is expected to have widespread impacts on the dynamics of infectious disease through environmental forcing, empirical data are lacking. Here, we investigated whether seasonality, specifically the timing of spring ice-thaw, affected susceptibility to infection by the emerging pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) across a montane community of amphibians that are suffering declines...

Data from: Ranging behaviour of badgers Meles meles vaccinated with Bacillus Calmette Guerin

Rosie Woodroffe, Christl A. Donnelly, Cally Ham, Seth Y. B. Jackson, Kelly Moyes, Kayna Chapman, Naomi G. Stratton & Samantha J. Cartwright
Because biological systems are complex, management interventions occasionally have unintended adverse consequences. For example, attempts to control bovine tuberculosis (TB) by culling badgers Meles meles have, under some circumstances, inadvertently increased cattle TB risks. Such harmful effects occur because culling profoundly alters badger movement behaviour, increasing pathogen transmission both between badgers and from badgers to cattle. It has recently been suggested that another TB management tool, badger vaccination with Bacillus Calmette Guerin, might provoke similar...

Data from: Correlates of extinction risk in squamate reptiles: the relative importance of biology, geography, threat and range size

Monika Böhm, Rhiannon Williams, Huw R. Bramhall, Kirsten M. McMillan, Ana D. Davidson, Andrés Garcia, Lucie M. Bland, Jon Bielby & Ben Collen
Aim Evaluating the relative roles of biological traits and environmental factors that predispose species to an elevated risk of extinction is of fundamental importance to macroecology. Identifying species that possess extinction-promoting traits allows targeted conservation action before precipitous declines occur. Such analyses have been carried out for several vertebrate groups, with the notable exception of reptiles. We identify traits correlating with high extinction risk in squamate reptiles, assess whether these differ with geography, taxonomy and...

Data from: A comparison of single-sample estimators of effective population sizes from genetic marker data

Jinliang Wang
In molecular ecology and conservation genetics studies, the important parameter of effective population size (Ne) is increasingly estimated from a single sample of individuals taken at random from a population and genotyped at a number of marker loci. Several estimators are developed, based on the information of linkage disequilibrium (LD), heterozygote excess (HE), molecular coancestry (MC) and sibship frequency (SF) in marker data. The most popular is the LD estimator, because it is more accurate...

Data from: Carry-over effects on the annual cycle of a migratory seabird: an experimental study

Annette L. Fayet, Robin Freeman, Akiko Shoji, Holly L. Kirk, Oliver Padget, Chris M. Perrins & Tim Guilford
Long-lived migratory animals must balance the cost of current reproduction with their own condition ahead of a challenging migration and future reproduction. In these species, carry-over effects, which occur when events in one season affect the outcome of the subsequent season, may be particularly exacerbated. However, how carry-over effects influence future breeding outcomes and whether (and how) they also affect behaviour during migration and wintering is unclear. Here we investigate carry-over effects induced by a...

Data from: Bat trait, genetic and pathogen data from large-scale investigations of African fruit bats (Eidolon helvum)

Alison J. Peel, Kate S. Baker, David T. S. Hayman, Richard Suu-Ire, Andrew C. Breed, Guy-Crispin Gembu, Tiziana Lembo, David R. Sargan, Anthony R. Fooks, Andrew A. Cunningham & James L. N. Wood
Bats, including African straw-coloured fruit bats (Eidolon helvum), have been highlighted as reservoirs of many recently emerged zoonotic viruses. This common, widespread and ecologically important species was the focus of longitudinal and continent-wide studies of the epidemiological and ecology of Lagos bat virus, henipaviruses and Achimota viruses. Here we present a spatial, morphological, demographic, genetic and serological dataset encompassing 2827 bats from nine countries over an 8-year period. Genetic data comprises cytochrome b mitochondrial sequences...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    21

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    21

Affiliations

  • Zoological Society of London
    21
  • University College London
    5
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    2
  • Imperial College London
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • Yunnan University
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1