6 Works

Data from: The niches of nuthatches affect their lineage evolution differently across latitude

Yu-Chi Chen, Masoud Nazarizadeh, Fu‐Min Lei, Xiao‐Jun Yang, Cheng‐Te Yao, Feng Dong, Lu Dong, Fa‐Sheng Zou, Sergei V. Drovetski, Yang Liu, Chun-Cheng Huang, Chih-Ming Hung, Fu-Min Lei, Yu‐Chi Chen, Chun‐Cheng Huang & Chih‐Ming Hung
Ecological niche evolution can promote or hinder the differentiation of taxa and determine their distribution. Niche‐mediated evolution may differ among climatic regimes, and thus species that occur across a wide latitudinal range offer a chance to test these heterogeneous evolutionary processes. In this study, we examine (1) how many lineages have evolved across the continent‐wide range of the Eurasian nuthatch (Sitta europaea), (2) whether the lineages’ niches are significantly divergent or conserved, and (3) how...

Data from: Effect of culling on individual badger Meles meles behaviour: potential implications for bovine tuberculosis transmission

Cally Ham, Christl A. Donnelly, Kelly L. Astley, Seth Y. B. Jackson & Rosie Woodroffe
1. Culling wildlife as a form of disease management can have unexpected and sometimes counterproductive outcomes. In the UK, badgers (Meles meles) are culled in efforts to reduce badger-to-cattle transmission of Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (TB). However, culling has previously been associated with both increased and decreased incidence of M. bovis infection in cattle. 2. The adverse effects of culling have been linked to cull-induced changes in badger ranging, but such...

Data from: Tidal drift removes the need for area restricted search in foraging Atlantic puffins

Ashley Bennison, John Quinn, Alison Debney & Mark Jessopp
Understanding how animals forage is a central objective in ecology. Theory suggests that where food is uniformly distributed, Brownian movement ensures maximum prey encounter rate, but when prey is patchy, the optimal strategy resembles a Lévy walk where Area Restricted Search (ARS) is interspersed with commuting between prey patches. Such movement appears ubiquitous in high trophic level marine predators. Here we report foraging and diving behaviour in a seabird with a high cost of flight,...

Data from: Seasonal variation in food availability and relative importance of dietary items in the Gambian epauletted fruit bat (Epomophorus gambianus)

Kofi Amponsah-Mensah, Andrew A. Cunningham, James L.N. Wood & Yaa Ntiamoa-Baidu
1. The Gambian epauletted fruit bat (Epomophorus gambianus) is very common across a variety of West African habitats, but very little information is available on its feeding ecology or its contribution to ecosystem function. 2. We investigated seasonal variation in food availability and the relative importance of dietary items used by this species in a forest-savannah transitional ecosystem. Dietary items were identified from 1,470 samples of faecal and ejecta pellets which had been collected under...

Data from: Phylogenomic resolution of the cetacean tree of life using target sequence capture

Michael McGowen, Georgia Tsagkogeorga, Sandra Álvarez-Carretero, Mario Dos Reis, Monika Struebig, Rob Deaville, Paul Jepson, Simon Jarman, Andrea Polanowski, Phillip Morin & Stephen Rossiter
The evolution of the cetaceans, from their early transition to an aquatic lifestyle to their subsequent diversification, has been the subject of numerous studies. However, while the higher-level relationships among cetacean families have been largely settled, several aspects of the systematics within these groups remain unresolved. Problematic clades include the oceanic dolphins (37 spp.), which have experienced a recent rapid radiation, and the beaked whales (22 spp.), which have not been investigated in detail using...

Data from: Disentangling serology to elucidate henipa‐ and filovirus transmission in Madagascar fruit bats

Cara E. Brook, Hafaliana C. Ranaivoson, Christopher C. Broder, Andrew A. Cunningham, Jean-Michel Heraud, Alison J. Peel, Louise Gibson, James L. N. Wood, C. Jessica Metcalf & Andrew P. Dobson
Bats are reservoirs for emerging human pathogens, including Hendra and Nipah henipaviruses and Ebola and Marburg filoviruses. These viruses demonstrate predictable patterns in seasonality and age structure across multiple systems; previous work suggests that they may circulate in Madagascar's endemic fruit bats, which are widely consumed as human food. We aimed to (a) document the extent of henipa‐ and filovirus exposure among Malagasy fruit bats, (b) explore seasonality in seroprevalence and serostatus in these bat...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Zoological Society of London
    6
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • Smithsonian Institution
    2
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    1
  • Princeton University
    1
  • University of Ghana
    1
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    1
  • Beijing Normal University
    1
  • Queen Mary University of London
    1
  • Griffith University
    1