29 Works

Data from: Current and projected global distribution of Phytophthora cinnamomi, one of the world’s worst plant pathogens

Treena Burgess, John K. Scott, Keith L. McDougall, Michael J. C. Stukely, Colin Crane, William A. Dunstan, Frances Brigg, Vera Andjic, Diane White, Tim Rudman, Frans Arentz, Noboru Ota, Giles E. St.J. Hardy, Treena I. Burgess & Giles E. St. J. Hardy
Globally, Phytophthora cinnamomi is listed as one of the 100 worst invasive alien species and active management is required to reduce impact and prevent spread in both horticulture and natural ecosystems. Conversely, there are regions thought to be suitable for the pathogen where no disease is observed. We developed a CLIMEX model for the global distribution of P. cinnamomi based on the pathogen's response to temperature and moisture and by incorporating extensive empirical evidence on...

Data from: Soil-mediated eco-evolutionary feedbacks in the invasive plant Alliaria petiolata

Jeffrey A. Evans, Richard A. Lankau, Adam S. Davis, S. Raghu & Douglas A. Landis
Ecological and evolutionary processes historically have been assumed to operate on significantly different time scales. We know now from theory and work in experimental and model systems that these processes can feed back on each other on mutually relevant time scales. Here, we present evidence of a soil-mediated eco-evolutionary feedback on the population dynamics of an invasive biennial plant, Alliaria petiolata. As populations age, natural selection drives down production of A. petiolata's important anti-mycorrhizal allelochemical,...

Data from: Population structure and gene flow in the global pest, Helicoverpa armigera

Craig J. Anderson, Wee T. Tay, Angela McGaughran, Karl Gordon & Tom K. Walsh
Helicoverpa armigera is a major agricultural pest that is distributed across Europe, Asia, Africa and Australasia. This species is hypothesized to have spread to the Americas 1.5 million years ago, founding a population that is at present, a distinct species, Helicoverpa zea. In 2013, H. armigera was confirmed to have re-entered South America via Brazil and subsequently spread. The source of the recent incursion is unknown and population structure in H. armigera is poorly resolved,...

Data from: Mate-guarding by male mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) is associated with female MHC genotype

Joanna M. Setchell, Shane A. Richards, Kristin M. Abbott & Leslie A. Knapp
Female choice for male major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genotype has been widely tested, but the relationship between male mating strategies and female MHC genotype has received far less attention. Moreover, few studies of MHC-associated mate choice test for the fitness effects underlying such choice. We examined mate-guarding by male mandrills, a species with intense male–male competition and female offspring care. We developed a statistical model based on 10 years of observations to describe how the...

Data from: Trade-offs and evolution of thermal adaptation in the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans

Li-Na Yang, Wen Zhu, E-Jiao Wu, Ce Yang, Peter H. Thrall, Jeremy J. Burdon, Li-Ping Jin, Li-Ping Shang & Jiasui Zhan
Temperature is one of the most important environmental parameters with crucial impacts on nearly all biological processes. Due to anthropogenic activity, average air temperatures are expected to increase by a few degrees in coming decades, accompanied by an increased occurrence of extreme temperature events. Such global trends are likely to have various major impacts on human society through their influence on natural ecosystems, food production and biotic interactions, including diseases. In this study, we used...

Data from: Going with the flow: the role of ocean circulation in global marine ecosystems under a changing climate

Simon J. Van Gennip, Ekaterina E. Popova, Andrew Yool, Gretta T. Pecl, Alistair J. Hobday & Cascade J. B. Sorte
Ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation and reduced productivity are widely considered to be the major stressors to ocean ecosystems induced by emissions of CO2. However, an overlooked stressor is the change in ocean circulation in response to climate change. Strong changes in the intensity and position of the western boundary currents have already been observed, and the consequences of such changes for ecosystems are beginning to emerge. In this study, we address climatically induced changes in...

Data from: Dynamic species co-occurrence networks require dynamic biodiversity surrogates

Ayesha I. T. Tulloch, Iadine Chadès, Yann Dujardin, Martin J. Westgate, Peter W. Lane & David Lindenmayer
In conservation it is inevitable that surrogates be selected to represent the occurrence of hard–to–find species and find priority locations for management. However, species co–occurrence can vary over time. Here we demonstrate how temporal dynamics in species co–occurrence influence the ability of managers to choose the best surrogate species. We develop an efficient optimisation formulation that selects the optimal set of complementary surrogate species from any co–occurrence network. We apply it to two Australian datasets...

Data from: Anthropogenic debris ingestion by avifauna in eastern Australia

Lauren Roman, Qamar A. Schuyler, Britta Denise Hardesty & Kathy A. Townsend
Anthropogenic debris in the world’s oceans and coastal environments is a pervasive global issue that has both direct and indirect impacts on avifauna. The number of bird species affected, the feeding ecologies associated with an increased risk of debris ingestion, and selectivity of ingested debris have yet to be investigated in most of Australia’s coastal and marine birds. With this study we aim to address the paucity of data regarding marine debris ingestion in Australian...

Data from: Diversity and linkage disequilibrium in farmed Tasmanian Atlantic salmon

James W. Kijas, Nick Elliot, Peter Kube, Bradley Evans, Natasha Botwright, Harry King, Craig R. Primmer, Klara Verbyla & J. Kijas
Farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) is a globally important production species, including in Australia where breeding and selection has been in progress since the 1960s. The recent development of SNP genotyping platforms means genome-wide association and genomic prediction can now be implemented to speed genetic gain. As a precursor, this study collected genotypes at 218 132 SNPs in 777 fish from a Tasmanian breeding population to assess levels of genetic diversity, the strength of linkage...

Data from: Multi-locus sequence data illuminate demographic drivers of Pleistocene speciation in semi-arid southern Australian birds (Cinclosoma spp.)

Gaynor Dolman & Leo Joseph
Background: During the Pleistocene, shifts of species distributions and their isolation in disjunct refugia led to varied outcomes in how taxa diversified. Some species diverged, others did not. Here, we begin to address another facet of the role of the Pleistocene in generating today’s diversity. We ask which processes contributed to divergence in semi-arid southern Australian birds. We isolated 11 autosomal nuclear loci and one mitochondrial locus from a total of 29 specimens of the...

Data from: Inferring contemporary and historical genetic connectivity from juveniles

Pierre Feutry, Oliver Berry, Peter M. Kyne, Richard D. Pillans, Rich Hillary, Peter M. Grewe, James R. Marthick, Grant Johnson, Rasanthi M. Gunasekera, Nicholas J. Bax, Mark Bravington & Richard M. Hillary
Measuring population connectivity is a critical task in conservation biology. While genetic markers can provide reliable long-term historical estimates of population connectivity, scientists are still limited in their ability to determine contemporary patterns of gene flow, the most practical time frame for management. Here, we tackled this issue by developing a new approach that only requires juvenile sampling at a single time period. To demonstrate the usefulness of our method, we used the Speartooth shark...

Data from: The ‘heritability’ of domestication and its functional partitioning in the pig

Miguel Perez-Enciso, Gustavo De Los Campos, Nick Hudson, James Kijas & Antonio Reverter
We propose to estimate the proportion of variance explained by regression on genome-wide markers (or genomic heritability) when wild/domestic status is considered the phenotype of interest. This approach differs from the standard Fst in that it can accommodate genetic similarity between individuals in a general form. We apply this strategy to complete genome data from 47 wild and domestic pigs from Asia and Europe. When we partitioned the total genomic variance into components associated to...

Data from: Landscape genomics reveals altered genome wide diversity within revegetated stands of Eucalyptus microcarpa (Grey Box)

Rebecca Jordan, Shannon K. Dillon, Suzanne M. Prober & Ary A. Hoffmann
In order to contribute to evolutionary resilience and adaptive potential in highly modified landscapes, revegetated areas should ideally reflect levels of genetic diversity within and across natural stands. Landscape genomic analyses enable such diversity patterns to be characterized at genome and chromosomal levels. Landscape-wide patterns of genomic diversity were assessed in Eucalyptus microcarpa, a dominant tree species widely used in revegetation in Southeastern Australia. Trees from small and large patches within large remnants, small isolated...

Data from: Selection signature analysis reveals genes associated with tail type in Chinese indigenous sheep

Zehu Yuan, Enming Liu, Z. Liu, J. W. Kijas, Caiye Zhu, Shijin Hu, Xiaomeng Ma, Li Zhang, Lixin Du, Huihua Wang & Caihong Wei
Fat-tailed sheep have commercial value because consumers prefer high-protein and low-fat food and producers care about feed conversion rate. However, fat-tailed sheep still have some scientific significance, as the fat tail is commonly regarded as a characteristic of environmental adaptability. Finding the candidate genes associated with fat tail formation is essential for breeding and conservation. To identify these candidate genes, we applied FST and hapFLK approaches in fat- and thin-tailed sheep with available 50K SNP...

Data from: Physiological plasticity and local adaptation to elevated pCO2 in calcareous algae: an ontogenetic and geographic approach

Jacqueline L. Padilla-Gamiño, Juan D. Gaitán-Espitia, Morgan W. Kelly & Gretchen E. Hofmann
To project how ocean acidification will impact biological communities in the future, it is critical to understand the potential for local adaptation and the physiological plasticity of marine organisms throughout their entire life cycle, as some stages may be more vulnerable than others. Coralline algae are ecosystem engineers that play significant functional roles in oceans worldwide, and are considered vulnerable to ocean acidification. Using different stages of coralline algae, we tested the hypothesis that populations...

Data from: Analysis of animal accelerometer data using hidden Markov models

Vianey Leos-Barajas, Theoni Photopoulou, Roland Langrock, Toby A. Patterson, Yuuki Y. Watanabe, Megan Murgatroyd & Yannis P. Papastamatiou
Use of accelerometers is now widespread within animal biologging as they provide a means of measuring an animal's activity in a meaningful and quantitative way where direct observation is not possible. In sequential acceleration data, there is a natural dependence between observations of behaviour, a fact that has been largely ignored in most analyses. Analyses of acceleration data where serial dependence has been explicitly modelled have largely relied on hidden Markov models (HMMs). Depending on...

Data from: Direct measurement of ant predation of weed seeds in wheat cropping

Theodore A. Evans & Patrick V. Gleeson
The ecosystem service of predation of weed seeds by naturally occurring seed-eating animals, including ants, in agricultural fields has been suggested to be a potentially important biocontrol option. Laboratory and field tests have found high levels of seed removal from experimentally placed seed; however, the effect of predation on naturally dispersed weed seeds is unknown. We measured the effect of invertebrate seed predators on natural weed seed dispersal and germination in a field experiment under...

Data from: Mesopredator management: effects of red fox control on the abundance, diet and use of space by feral cats

Robyn Molsher, Alan E. Newsome, Thomas M. Newsome & Christopher R. Dickman
Apex predators are subject to lethal control in many parts of the world to minimize their impacts on human industries and livelihoods. Diverse communities of smaller predators - mesopredators - often remain after apex predator removal. Despite concern that these mesopredators may be 'released' in the absence of the apex predator and exert negative effects on each other and on co-occurring prey, these interactions have been little studied. Here, we investigate the potential effects of...

Data from: Evolutionary potential of the extrinsic incubation period of dengue virus in Aedes aegypti

Yixin H. Ye, Stephen F. Chenoweth, Alison M. Carrasco, Scott Lee Allen, Francesca D. Frentiu, Andrew F. Van Den Hurk, Nigel W. Beebe & Elizabeth A. McGraw
Dengue fever is the most common arboviral disease worldwide. It is caused by dengue viruses (DENV) and the mosquito Aedes aegypti is its primary vector. One of the most powerful determinants of a mosquito's ability to transmit DENV is the length of the extrinsic incubation period (EIP), the time it takes for a virus to be transmitted by a mosquito after consuming an infected blood meal. Here, we repeatedly measured DENV load in the saliva...

Data from: Potential mechanisms of coexistence in closely related forbs

Timothy L. Staples, John M. Dwyer, Xingwen Loy & Margaret M. Mayfield
The stable coexistence of very similar species has perplexed ecologists for decades and has been central to the development of coexistence theory. According to modern coexistence theory, species can coexist stably (i.e. persist indefinitely with no long-term density trends) as long as species' niche differences exceed competitive ability differences, even if these differences are very small. Recent studies have directly quantified niche and competitive ability differences in experimental communities at small spatial scales, but provide...

Data from: Both morph- and species-dependent asymmetries affect reproductive barriers between heterostylous species

Barbara Keller, Jurriaan M. De Vos, Alexander N. Schmidt-Lebuhn, James D. Thomson & Elena Conti
The interaction between floral traits and reproductive isolation is crucial to explaining the extraordinary diversity of angiosperms. Heterostyly, a complex floral polymorphism that optimizes outcrossing, evolved repeatedly and has been shown to accelerate diversification in primroses, yet its potential influence on isolating mechanisms remains unexplored. Furthermore, the relative contribution of pre- versus postmating barriers to reproductive isolation is still debated. No experimental study has yet evaluated the possible effects of heterostyly on pre- and postmating...

Data from: 28 year temporal sequence of epidemic dynamics in a natural rust – host plant metapopulation

Lars Ericson, Warren J. Müller & Jeremy J. Burdon
A long-term study of disease dynamics caused by the rust Uromyces valerianae in 31 discrete populations of Valeriana salina provides a rare opportunity to explore extended temporal patterns in the epidemiology of a natural host-pathogen metapopulation. Over a 28-year period, pathogen population dynamics varied across the metapopulation with disease incidence (presence/absence), prevalence (% plants infected) and severity (% leaf area covered by lesions) all showing strong population and year effects, indicative of heterogeneity among years...

Data from: Two-current choice flumes for testing avoidance and preference in aquatic animals

Fredrik Jutfelt, Josefin Sundin, Graham D. Raby, Anna-Sara Krång & Timothy D. Clark
Aquatic chemical ecology is an important and growing field of research that involves understanding how organisms perceive and respond to chemical cues in their environment. Research assessing the preference or avoidance of a water source containing specific chemical cues has increased in popularity in recent years, and a variety of methods have been described in the scientific literature. Two-current choice flumes have seen the greatest increase in popularity, perhaps because of their potential to address...

Data from: An environmental DNA-based method for monitoring spawning activity: a case study, using the endangered Macquarie perch (Macquaria australasica)

Jonas Bylemans, Elise M. Furlan, Christopher M. Hardy, Prudence McGuffie, Mark Lintermans & Dianne M. Gleeson
Determining the timing and location of reproductive events is critical for efficient management of species. However, methods currently used for aquatic species are costly, time intensive, biased and often require destructive or injurious sampling. Hence, developing a non-invasive sampling method to accurately determine the timing and location of reproduction for aquatic species would be extremely valuable. We conducted an experimental and field study to determine the influence of spawning, and the mass release of spermatozoa...

Data from: A phylogenetic analysis of macroevolutionary patterns in fermentative yeasts

Rocío Paleo-López, Julian Fernando Quintero-Galvis, Jaiber J. Solano-Iguaran, Angela M. Sanchez-Salazar, Juan Diego Gaitán-Espitia, Roberto F. Nespolo & Juan D. Gaitan-Espitia
When novel sources of ecological opportunity are available, physiological innovations can trigger adaptive radiations. This could be the case of yeasts (Saccharomycotina), in which an evolutionary novelty is represented by the capacity to exploit simple sugars from fruits (fermentation). During adaptive radiations, diversification and morphological evolution are predicted to slow-down after early bursts of diversification. Here, we performed the first comparative phylogenetic analysis in yeasts, testing the “early burst” prediction on species diversification and also...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    29

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    29

Affiliations

  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    29
  • University of Tasmania
    4
  • University of Queensland
    3
  • University of Melbourne
    3
  • University of Western Australia
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University Austral de Chile
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Capital Normal University
    1
  • University of California, Merced
    1