25 Works

Data from: Geochemical analyses reveal the importance of environmental history for blue carbon sequestration

Jeffrey J. Kelleway, Neil Saintilan, Peter I. Macreadie, Jeff A. Baldock, Hendrik Heijnis, A. Zawadzkis, Patricia Gadd, Geraldine Jacobsen & Peter J. Ralph
Coastal habitats including saltmarshes and mangrove forests can accumulate and store significant blue carbon stocks, which may persist for millennia. Despite this implied stability, the distribution and structure of intertidal-supratidal wetlands is known to respond to changes imposed by geomorphic evolution, climatic, sea level and anthropogenic influences. In this study, we reconstruct environmental histories and biogeochemical conditions in four wetlands of similar contemporary vegetation in SE Australia. The objective is to assess the importance of...

Data from: Ants as ecological indicators of rainforest restoration: community convergence and the development of an Ant Forest Indicator Index in the Australian wet tropics

Michael J. Lawes, Anthony M. Moore, Alan N. Andersen, Noel D. Preece & Donald C. Franklin
Ecosystem restoration can help reverse biodiversity loss, but whether faunal communities of forests undergoing restoration converge with those of primary forest over time remains contentious. There is a need to develop faunal indicators of restoration success that more comprehensively reflect changes in biodiversity and ecosystem function. Ants are an ecologically dominant faunal group and are widely advocated as ecological indicators. We examine ant species and functional group responses on a chronosequence of rainforest restoration in...

Data from: Primers for Castilleja and their utility across Orobanchaceae: II. Single-copy nuclear loci

Maribeth Latvis, Sarah J. Jacobs, Sebastian M. E. Mortimer, Melissa Richards, Paul D. Blischak, Sarah Mathews & David C. Tank
Premise of the study: We developed primers targeting nuclear loci in Castilleja with the goal of reconstructing the evolutionary history of this challenging clade. These primers were tested across other major clades in Orobanchaceae to assess their broader utility. Methods and Results: We assembled low-coverage genomes for three taxa in Castilleja and developed primer combinations for the single-copy conserved ortholog set (COSII) and the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene family. These primer combinations were designed to...

Data from: Loggerhead sea turtle embryos (Caretta caretta) regulate expression of stress-response and developmental genes when exposed to a biologically realistic heat stress

Blair P. Bentley, Brian J. Haas, Jamie N. Tedeschi & Oliver Berry
Oviparous reptile embryos are expected to breach their critical thermal maxima if temperatures reach those predicted under current climate change models due to the lack the maternal buffering processes and parental care. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are integral in the molecular response to thermal stress, and their expression is heritable, but the roles of other candidate families such as the heat shock factors (HSFs) have not been determined in reptiles. Here we subject embryonic sea...

Data from: Local demographic and epidemiological patterns in the Linum marginale – Melampsora lini association – a multi-year study

Hanna Susi, Peter H. Thrall, Luke G. Barrett & Jeremy J. Burdon
1.Many theoretical and empirical studies operate from an assumption that pathogens have a significant influence on the fecundity and lifespan of their host species. However, there is surprisingly little data investigating the long-term fitness impacts and genetic consequences that arise from pathogen infection in natural populations. Here, we address this gap through the analysis of a dataset investigating the local population dynamics of a native host plant (Linum marginale) and an associated rust pathogen (Melampsora...

Data from: Limits of use of social media for monitoring biosecurity events

Marijke Welvaert, Omar Al-Ghattas, Mark Cameron & Peter Caley
Compared to applications that trigger massive information streams, like earthquakes and human disease epidemics, the data input for agricultural and environmental biosecurity events (ie. the introduction of unwanted exotic pests and pathogens), is expected to be sparse and less frequent. To investigate if Twitter data can be useful for the detection and monitoring of biosecurity events, we adopted a three-step process. First, we confirmed that sightings of two migratory species, the Bogong moth (Agrotis infusa)...

Data from: Resolving a phylogenetic hypothesis for parrots: implications from systematics to conservation

Kaiya L. Provost, Leo Joseph & Brian Tilston Smith
Advances in sequencing technology and phylogenetics have revolutionised avian biology by providing an evolutionary framework for studying natural groupings. In the parrots (Psittaciformes), DNA-based studies have led to a reclassification of clades, yet substantial gaps remain in the data gleaned from genetic information. Here we provide an overview of published genetic data of parrots, characterise sampling depth across the phylogeny, and evaluate support for existing systematic treatments. We inferred a concatenated tree with 307 species...

Data from: Constraints on trait combinations explain climatic drivers of biodiversity: the importance of trait covariance in community assembly

John M. Dwyer & Daniel C. Laughlin
Trade-offs maintain diversity and structure communities along environmental gradients. Theory indicates that if covariance among functional traits sets a limit on the number of viable trait combinations in a given environment, then communities with strong multidimensional trait constraints should exhibit low species diversity. We tested this prediction in winter annual plant assemblages along an aridity gradient using multilevel structural equation modelling. Univariate and multivariate functional diversity measures were poorly explained by aridity, and were surprisingly...

Data from: Mobulid rays feed on euphausiids in the Bohol Sea

Christoph A. Rohner, Katherine B. Burgess, Joshua M. Rambahiniarison, Joshua D. Stewart, Alessandro Ponzo & Anthony J. Richardson
Mobulid rays have a conservative life history and are caught in direct fisheries and as by-catch. Their subsequent vulnerability to overexploitation has recently been recognized, but fisheries management can be ineffective if it ignores habitat and prey preferences and other trophic interactions of the target species. Here, we assessed the feeding ecology of four mobulids (Manta birostris, Mobula tarapacana, M. japanica, M. thurstoni) in the Bohol Sea, Philippines, using stomach contents analysis of fisheries specimens...

Data from: Landscape context explains changes in the functional diversity of regenerating forests better than climate or species richness

Michael Sams, Hao Ran Lai, Stephen Bonser, Peter Vesk, Robert Kooyman, Daniel Metcalfe, John W. Morgan, Margaret Mayfield, M. A. Sams, D. J. Metcalfe, R. M. Kooyman & P. A. Vesk
Aim A rich literature on forest succession provides general expectations for the steps forests go through while reassembling after disturbance, yet we still have a surprisingly poor understanding of why the outcomes of forest recovery after logging (or other disturbances) vary so extensively. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that regional species pool, system productivity, climate and landscape structure are important drivers of forest reassembly outcomes. Location Transect 1,500 km in length along the...

Data from: Evidence of genomic adaptation to climate in Eucalyptus microcarpa: implications for adaptive potential to projected climate change

Rebecca Jordan, Ary A. Hoffmann, Shannon K. Dillon & Suzanne M. Prober
Understanding whether populations can adapt in situ or whether interventions are required is of key importance for biodiversity management under climate change. Landscape genomics is becoming an increasingly important and powerful tool for rapid assessments of climate adaptation, especially in long-lived species such as trees. We investigated climate adaptation in Eucalyptus microcarpa using the DArTseq genomic approach. A combination of FST outlier and environmental association analyses were performed using > 4,200 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms...

Data from: Shoot growth of woody trees and shrubs is predicted by maximum plant height and associated traits

Sean M. Gleason, Andrea E.A. Stephens, Wade C. Tozer, Chris J. Blackman, Don W. Butler, Yvonne Chang, Alicia M. Cook, Julia Cooke, Claire A. Laws, Julieta A. Rosell, Stephanie A. Stuart, Mark Westoby & Andrea E. A. Stephens
1. The rate of elongation and thickening of individual branches (shoots) varies across plant species. This variation is important for the outcome of competition and other plant-plant interactions. Here we compared rates of shoot growth across 44 species from tropical, warm temperate, and cool temperate forests of eastern Australia. 2. Shoot growth rate was found to correlate with a suite of traits including the potential height of the species, xylem-specific conductivity, leaf size, leaf area...

Data from: Seascape genomics reveals fine-scale patterns of dispersal for a reef fish along the ecologically divergent coast of Northwestern Australia

Joseph D. DiBattista, Michael J. Travers, Glenn I. Moore, Richard D. Evans, Stephen J. Newman, Ming Feng, Samuel D. Moyle, Rebecca J. Gorton, Thor Saunders & Oliver Berry
Understanding the drivers of dispersal among populations is a central topic in marine ecology and fundamental for spatially explicit management of marine resources. The extensive coast of Northwestern Australia provides an emerging frontier for implementing new genomic tools to comparatively identify patterns of dispersal across diverse and extreme environmental conditions. Here, we focused on the stripey snapper (Lutjanus carponotatus), which is important to recreational, charter-based and customary fishers throughout the Indo-West Pacific. We collected 1,016...

Data from: Finding the best management policy to eradicate invasive species from spatial ecological networks with simultaneous actions

Sam Nicol, Régis Sabbadin, Nathalie Peyrard & Iadine Chades
1. Spatial management of invasive species is more likely to be successful when multiple locations are treated simultaneously. However, selecting the best locations to act is difficult due to the many options available at any time. 2. We design a near-optimal policy for applying multiple actions simultaneously for faster invasive species control within a network. Our method uses a recent optimisation tool, the Graph-based Markov decision process (GMDP). Since the policy can be difficult to...

Data from: Intraspecific variation in climate-relevant traits in a tropical rainforest lizard

John Llewelyn, Stewart L. Macdonald, Amberlee Hatcher, Craig Moritz & Ben L. Phillips
Aim The exceptionally rich biodiversity found in tropical rainforest is under threat from anthropogenic climate change. We recognize the threat, yet we have little knowledge of the capacity of tropical species to adjust their climate sensitivity in response to it. One indicator of a species’ capacity to adjust to different climates is the amount of intraspecific variation observed in its climate-relevant traits; if a climate-relevant trait varies, and this variation is correlated with local climates,...

Data from: Molecular analysis of caffeoyl residues related to pigmentation in green cotton fibers

Hongjie Feng, Yonglin Yang, Shichao Sun, Yanjun Li, Lin Zhang, Jingkui Tian, Qianhao Zhu, Zili Feng, Heqin Zhu & Jie Sun
The pigment components in green cotton fibers were isolated and identified as 22-O-caffeoyl-22-hydroxymonodocosanoin and 22-O-caffeoyl-22-hydroxydocosanoic acid. The concentration of 22-O-caffeoyl-22-hydroxymonodocosanoin was correlated positively with the degree of green fibers of color, indicating a role of caffeoyl derivatives in pigmentation of green cotton fibers. Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) contains four genes (Gh4CL1 to Gh4CL4) encoding 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), key enzymes of the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway. In 15 to 24 days-post anthesis fibers, the expression level...

Modelling seasonal habitat suitability for wide-ranging species: Invasive wild pigs in northern Australia

Jens G. Froese, Carl S. Smith, Peter A. Durr, Clive A. McAlpine & Rieks D. Van Klinken
Invasive wildlife often causes serious damage to the economy and agriculture as well as environmental, human and animal health. Habitat models can fill knowledge gaps about species distributions and assist planning to mitigate impacts. Yet, model accuracy and utility may be compromised by small study areas and limited integration of species ecology or temporal variability. Here we modelled seasonal habitat suitability for wild pigs, a widespread and harmful invader, in northern Australia. We developed a...

Data from: Taxon sampling to address an ancient rapid radiation: a supermatrix phylogeny of early brachyceran flies (Diptera)

Seunggwan Shin, Keith M. Bayless, Shaun L. Winterton, Torsten Dikow, Bryan D. Lessard, David K. Yeates, Brian M. Wiegmann & Michelle D. Trautwein
Early diverging brachyceran fly lineages underwent a rapid radiation approximately 180 million years ago, coincident in part with the origin of flowering plants. This region of the fly tree includes 25,000 described extant species with diverse ecological roles such as blood feeding (haematophagy), parasitoidism, predation, pollination, and wood feeding (xylophagy). Early diverging brachyceran lineages were once considered a monophyletic group of families called Orthorrhapha, based on the shared character of a longitudinal break in the...

Data from: Population assignment in autopolyploids

David L. Field, Linda M. Broadhurst, Carole P. Elliot & Andrew G. Young
Understanding patterns of contemporary gene dispersal within and among populations is of critical importance to population genetics and in managing populations for conservation. In contrast to diploids, there are few studies of gene dispersal in autopolyploids, in part due to complex polysomic inheritance and genotype ambiguity. Here we develop a novel approach for population assignment for codominant markers for autotetraploids and autohexaploids. This method accounts for polysomic inheritance, unreduced gametes and unknown allele dosage. It...

Data from: Herbivores safeguard plant diversity by reducing variability in dominance

Brent Mortensen, Brent Danielson, Stan W. Harpole, Juan Alberti, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Lori Biederman, Elizabeth T. Borer, Marc W. Cadotte, John M. Dwyer, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Pablo Luis Peri, Eric W. Seabloom & W. Stanley Harpole
1. Reductions in community evenness can lead to local extinctions as dominant species exclude subordinate species; however, herbivores can prevent competitive exclusion by consuming otherwise dominant plant species, thus increasing evenness. While these predictions logically result from chronic, gradual reductions in evenness, rapid, temporary pulses of dominance may also reduce species richness. Short pulses of dominance can occur as biotic or abiotic conditions temporarily favor one or a few species, manifested as increased temporal variability...

Data from: DNA metabarcoding for diet analysis and biodiversity: A case study using the endangered Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea)

Tina E. Berry, Sylvia K. Osterrieder, Dáithí C. Murray, Megan L. Coghlan, Anthony J. Richardson, Alicia K. Grealy, Michael Stat, Lars Bejder & Michael Bunce
The analysis of apex predator diet has the ability to deliver valuable insights into ecosystem health, and the potential impacts a predator might have on commercially relevant species. The Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea) is an endemic apex predator and one of the world's most endangered pinnipeds. Given that prey availability is vital to the survival of top predators, this study set out to understand what dietary information DNA metabarcoding could yield from 36 sea...

Data from: Inter-group variability in seed dispersal by white-handed gibbons in mosaic forest

Suchada Phiphatsuwannachai, David A. Westcott, Adam McKeown & Tommaso Savini
Seed dispersers, like white-handed gibbons (Hylobates lar), can display wide inter-group variability in response to distribution and abundance of resources in their habitat. In different home ranges, they can modify their movement patterns along with the shape and scale of seed shadow produced. However, the effect of inter-group variability on the destination of dispersed seeds is still poorly explained. In this study, we evaluate how seed dispersal patterns of this arboreal territorial frugivore varies between...

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Data from: Species wood density and the location of planted seedlings drive early-stage seedling survival during tropical forest restoration

Lachlan S. Charles, John M. Dwyer, Tobias J. Smith, Sophie Connors, Petra Marschner & Margaret M. Mayfield
1.The success of restoration projects is known to vary widely, with outcomes relating to numerous biotic and abiotic factors. Though many studies have examined the factors associated with long-term restoration success, few have examined which factors impact the establishment of restoration plantings. 2.In Australia's Wet Tropics, we used a large replicated restoration experiment to assess seedling survival for 24 native rainforest species commonly used in local restoration efforts. The experiment allowed for a rigorous assessment...

Data from: Predicting community rank-abundance distributions under current and future climates

James K. McCarthy, Karel Mokany, Simon Ferrier & John M. Dwyer
Understanding influences of environmental change on biodiversity requires consideration of more than just species richness. Here we present a novel framework for understanding possible changes in species’ abundance structures within communities under climate change. We demonstrate this using comprehensive survey and environmental data from 1,748 woody plant communities across southeast Queensland, Australia, to model rank-abundance distributions (RADs) under current and future climates. Under current conditions, the models predicted RADs consistent with the region’s dominant vegetation...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    25

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    25

Affiliations

  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    25
  • University of Queensland
    7
  • University of Melbourne
    3
  • Macquarie University
    3
  • University of Technology Sydney
    2
  • University of Western Australia
    2
  • James Cook University
    2
  • King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi
    1
  • National Oceanography Centre
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1