23 Works

Data from: Cytochrome P450 diversification and hostplant utilization patterns in specialist and generalist moths: birth, death, and adaptation

Bernarda Calla, Katherine Noble, Reed M. Johnson, Kimberly K. O. Walden, Mary A. Schuler, Hugh M. Robertson & May R. Berenbaum
Across insect genomes, the size of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP) gene superfamily varies widely. CYPome size variation has been attributed to reciprocal adaptive radiations in insect detoxification genes in response to plant biosynthetic gene radiations driven by coevolution between herbivores and their chemically defended hostplants. Alternatively, variation in CYPome size may be due to random “birth and death” processes, whereby exponential increase via gene duplications is limited by random decay via gene death or...

Data from: Plant water potential improves prediction of empirical stomatal models

William R. L. Anderegg, Stephen Pacala, John S. Sperry, Brendan Choat, Daniel J. Chmura, Thomas Kolb, Frederick Meinzer, Pilar Pita, Víctor Resco De Dios & Brett T. Wolfe
Climate change is expected to lead to increases in drought frequency and severity, with deleterious effects on many ecosystems. Stomatal responses to changing environmental conditions form the backbone of all ecosystem models, but are based on empirical relationships and are not well-tested during drought conditions. Here, we use a dataset of 34 woody plant species spanning global forest biomes to examine the effect of leaf water potential on stomatal conductance and test the predictive accuracy...

Data from: The acacia ants revisited: convergent evolution and biogeographic context in an iconic ant/plant mutualism

Philip S. Ward & Michael G. Branstetter
Phylogenetic and biogeographic analyses can enhance our understanding of multispecies interactions by placing the origin and evolution of such interactions in a temporal and geographical context. We use a phylogenomic approach—ultraconserved element sequence capture—to investigate the evolutionary history of an iconic multispecies mutualism: Neotropical acacia ants (Pseudomyrmex ferrugineus group) and their associated Vachellia hostplants. In this system, the ants receive shelter and food from the host plant, and they aggressively defend the plant against herbivores...

Data from: Ambient temperature-mediated changes in hepatic gene expression of a mammalian herbivore (Neotoma lepida)

Patrice Kurnath Connors, Jael R. Malenke & M. Denise Dearing
Herbivores regularly ingest natural toxins produced by plants as a defence against herbivory. Recent work suggests that compound toxicity is exacerbated at higher ambient temperatures. This phenomenon, known as temperature-dependent toxicity (TDT), is the likely result of decreased liver function at warmer temperatures; however, the underlying cause of TDT remains speculative. In the present study, we compared the effects of temperature and dietary plant toxins on differential gene expression in the liver of an herbivorous...

Data from: The flashing Brownian ratchet and Parrondo’s paradox

Stewart N. Ethier & Jiyeon Lee
A Brownian ratchet is a one-dimensional diffusion process that drifts towards a minimum of a periodic asymmetric sawtooth potential. A flashing Brownian ratchet is a process that alternates between two regimes, a one-dimensional Brownian motion and a Brownian ratchet, producing directed motion. These processes have been of interest to physicists and biologists for nearly 25 years. The flashing Brownian ratchet is the process that motivated Parrondo’s paradox, in which two fair games of chance, when...

Data from: Morphological and molecular evolution and their consequences for conservation and taxonomy in the Le Conte's Thrasher (Toxostoma lecontei)

Hernán Vázquez-Miranda, Josie A. Griffin, Jay M. Sheppard, Jordan M. Herman, Octavio Rojas-Soto & Robert M. Zink
We evaluated geographic variation and subspecific taxonomy in the Le Conte's Thrasher (Toxostoma lecontei) by analyzing DNA sequences from 16 nuclear loci, one mitochondrial DNA locus, and four study skin characters, and compared these data sets with previously published data on plumage coloration and different mtDNA genes. Morphological support for the southernmost taxon, T. l. arenicola, is relatively weak: multivariate analyses of morphometrics or back coloration do not provide diagnostic support, although one color character...

Data from: The effect of nitrogen availability and water conditions on competition between a facultative CAM plant and an invasive grass

Kailiang Yu, Paolo D'Odorico, David E. Carr, Ashden Personius & Scott L. Collins
Abstract Plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) are increasing their abundance in drylands worldwide. The drivers and mechanisms underlying the increased dominance of CAM plants and CAM expression (i.e., nocturnal carboxylation) in facultative CAM plants, however, remain poorly understood. We investigated how nutrient and water availability affected competition between Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (a model facultative CAM species) and the invasive C3 grass Bromus mollis that co-occur in California's coastal grasslands. Specifically we investigated the extent to...

Data from: Mouse fitness measures reveal incomplete functional redundancy of Hox paralogous group 1 proteins

James S. Ruff, Raed B. Saffarini, Leda L. Ramoz, Linda C. Morrison, Shambralyn Baker, Sean M. Laverty, Petr Tvrdik, Mario R. Capecchi & Wayne K. Potts
Here we assess the fitness consequences of the replacement of the Hoxa1 coding region with its paralog Hoxb1 in mice (Mus musculus) residing in semi-natural enclosures. Previously, this Hoxa1B1 swap was reported as resulting in no discernible embryonic or physiological phenotype (i.e., functionally redundant), despite the 51% amino acid sequence differences between these two Hox proteins. Within heterozygous breeding cages no differences in litter size nor deviations from Mendelian genotypic expectations were observed in the...

Data from: Habitat disturbance selects against both small and large species across varying climates

Heloise Gibb, Nathan J. Sanders, Robert R. Dunn, Xavier Arnan, Heraldo L. Vasconcellos, David A. Donoso, Alan N. Andersen, Rogerio R. Silva, Tom R. Bishop, Crisanto Gomez, Blair F. Grossman, Kalsum M. Yusah, Sarah H. Luke, Renata Pacheco, Jessica Pearce-Duvet, Javier Retana, Melanie Tista, Catherine L. Parr & H. L. Vasconcelos
Global extinction drivers, including habitat disturbance and climate change, are thought to affect larger species more than smaller species. However, it is unclear if such drivers interact to affect assemblage body size distributions. We asked how these two key global change drivers differentially affect the interspecific size distributions of ants, one of the most abundant and ubiquitous animal groups on earth. We also asked whether there is evidence of synergistic interactions and whether effects are...

Data from: Phylogenomic insights into the evolution of stinging wasps and the origins of ants and bees

Michael G. Branstetter, Bryan N. Danforth, James P. Pitts, Brant C. Faircloth, Philip S. Ward, Matthew L. Buffington, Michael W. Gates, Robert R. Kula & Seán G. Brady
The stinging wasps (Hymenoptera: Aculeata) are an extremely diverse lineage of hymenopteran insects, encompassing over 70,000 described species and a diversity of life history traits, including ectoparasitism, cleptoparasitism, predation, pollen feeding (bees [Anthophila] and Masarinae) and eusociality (social vespid wasps, ants, and some bees) [1]. The most well-studied lineages of Aculeata are the ants, which are ecologically dominant in most terrestrial ecosystems [2], and the bees, the most important lineage of angiosperm-pollinating insects [3]. Establishing...

Data from: Modern pollen from small hollows reflects Athrotaxis cupressoides density across a wildfire gradient in subalpine forests of the Central Plateau, Tasmania, Australia

Philip E. Higuera, Jesse L. Morris, Simon Haberle & Cathy Whitlock
Pollen assemblages from 50 small hollows were used to resolve fire-caused vegetation patterns in a ~2-km2 subalpine landscape on the Central Plateau of Tasmania, Australia. Sites were characterized by varying abundance of the dominant tree species, Athrotaxis cupressoides, reflecting mortality from a wildfire that occurred 53 years prior to sampling. Sites were classified a priori based on fire-related Athrotaxis mortality as burned (100% standing dead), unburned (<5% standing dead), and mixed (intermediate proportions). Non-parametric analysis...

Data from: A disparity between locomotor economy and territory holding ability in male house mice

Jeremy S. Morris, James S. Ruff, Wayne K. Potts & David R. Carrier
Both economical locomotion and physical fighting are important performance traits to many species because of their direct influence on components of Darwinian fitness. Locomotion represents a substantial portion of the total daily energy budget of many animals. Fighting performance often determines individual reproductive fitness through the means of resource control, social dominance, and access to mates. However, phenotypic traits that improve either locomotor economy or fighting ability may diminish performance in the other. Here we...

Data from: High-throughput sequencing of transposable element insertions suggests adaptive evolution of the invasive Asian Tiger Mosquito towards temperate environments

Clément Goubert, Hélène Henri, Guillaume Minard, Claire Valiente Moro, Patrick Mavingui, Cristina Vieira & Matthieu Boulesteix
Invasive species represent unique opportunities to evaluate the role of local adaptation during colonization of new environments. Among these species, the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a threatening vector of several human viral diseases, including dengue and chikungunya, and raises concerns about the Zika fever. Its broad presence in both temperate and tropical environments has been considered the reflection of great “ecological plasticity.” However, no study has been conducted to assess the role of...

Data from: Sexual selection constrains the body mass of male but not female mice

James S. Ruff, Douglas H. Cornwall, Linda C. Morrison, Joseph W. Cauceglia, Adam C. Nelson, Shannon M. Gaukler, Shawn Meagher, Lara S. Carroll & Wayne K. Potts
Sexual size dimorphism results when female and male body size is influenced differently by natural and sexual selection. Typically, in polygynous species larger male body size is thought to be favored in competition for mates and constraints on maximal body size are due to countervailing natural selection on either sex; however, it has been postulated that sexual selection itself may result in stabilizing selection at an optimal mass. Here we test this hypothesis by retrospectively...

Data from: New material and systematic re-evaluation of Medusaceratops lokii (Dinosauria: Ceratopsidae) from the Judith River Formation (Campanian, Montana)

Kentaro Chiba, Michael J. Ryan, Federico Fanti, Mark A. Loewen & David C. Evans
Medusaceratops lokii is an enigmatic taxon of ceratopsid represented by partial parietals from the Mansfield bonebed in the Campanian Judith River Formation, Montana. Originally, all ceratopsid material collected from this bonebed was referred to the centrosaurine ceratopsid Albertaceratops, but subsequently two parietals were designated the types of the chasmosaurine, M. lokii, in part, because they were interpreted to have three epiparietals bilaterally. Here we describe new material from the bonebed that allows a systematic revision...

Data from: Recruitment dynamics of ESCRT-III and Vps4 to endosomes and implications for reverse membrane budding

Manuel Alonso Y. Adell, Simona M. Migliano, Srigokul Upadhyayula, Yury S. Bykov, Simon Sprenger, Mehrshad Pakdel, Georg F. Vogel, Gloria Jih, Wesley Skillern, Reza Behrouzi, Markus Babst, Oliver Schmidt, Michael W. Hess, John A.G. Briggs, Tomas Kirchhausen, David Teis & John AG Briggs
The ESCRT machinery mediates reverse membrane scission. By quantitative fluorescence lattice light-sheet microscopy, we have shown that ESCRT-III subunits polymerize rapidly on yeast endosomes, together with the recruitment of at least two Vps4 hexamers. During their 3-45 second lifetimes, the ESCRT-III assemblies accumulated 75-200 Snf7 and 15-50 Vps24 molecules. Productive budding events required at least two additional Vps4 hexamers. Membrane budding was associated with continuous, stochastic exchange of Vps4 and ESCRT-III components, rather than steady...

Data from: Enriching the ant tree of life: enhanced UCE bait set for genome-scale phylogenetics of ants and other Hymenoptera

Michael G. Branstetter, John T. Longino, Philip S. Ward & Brant C. Faircloth
1. Targeted enrichment of conserved genomic regions (e.g., ultraconserved elements or UCEs) has emerged as a promising tool for inferring evolutionary history in many organismal groups. Because the UCE approach is still relatively new, much remains to be learned about how best to identify UCE loci and design baits to enrich them. 2. We test an updated UCE identification and bait design workflow for the insect order Hymenoptera, with a particular focus on ants. The...

Data from: Dry habitats were crucibles of domestication in the evolution of agriculture in ants

Michael G. Branstetter, Ana Ješovnik, Jeffrey Sosa-Calvo, Michael W. Lloyd, Brant C. Faircloth, Seán G. Brady & Ted R. Schultz
The evolution of ant agriculture, as practiced by the fungus-farming “attine” ants, is thought to have arisen in the wet rainforests of South America about 55-65 Ma. Most subsequent attine agricultural evolution, including the domestication event that produced the ancestor of higher attine cultivars, is likewise hypothesized to have occurred in South American rainforests. The “out-of-the-rainforest” hypothesis, while generally accepted, has never been tested in a phylogenetic context. It also presents a problem for explaining...

Data from: Integrating phylogenomic and population genomic patterns in avian lice provides a more complete picture of parasite evolution

Andrew D. Sweet, Bret M. Boyd, Julie M. Allen, Scott M. Villa, Michel P. Valim, Jose L. Rivera-Parra, Robert E. Wilson & Kevin P. Johnson
Parasite diversity accounts for most of the biodiversity on earth, and is shaped by many processes (e.g. cospeciation, host-switching). To identify the effects of the processes that shape parasite diversity, it is ideal to incorporate both deep (phylogenetic) and shallow (population) perspectives. To this end, we developed a novel workflow to obtain phylogenetic and population genetic data from whole genome sequences of body lice parasitizing New World ground-doves. Phylogenies from these data showed consistent, highly...

Data from: Impact of habitat fragmentation on the spatial structure of the Eastern Arc Forests in East Africa: implications for biodiversity conservation

William D. Newmark & Phoebe B. McNeally
The Eastern Arc Mountains in Tanzania and Kenya are one of 35 global biodiversity hotspots. The Eastern Arc forests are, as are many other tropical biodiversity hotspots, highly fragmented. Understanding the impact of habitat fragmentation (i.e., habitat loss and subdivision) on the spatial structure of the Eastern Arc forests is important because forest spatial structure highly influences species richness, persistence, and extinction debt. Here we examine the impact of habitat fragmentation on the spatial structure...

Data from: Biodiverse cities: the nursery industry, homeowners, and neighborhood differences drive urban tree composition

Meghan Avolio, Diane Pataki, Tara Trammell, Joanna Endter-Wada, Meghan L. Avolio, Diane E. Pataki & Tara L. E. Trammell
In arid and semi-arid regions, where few if any trees are native, city trees are largely human-planted. Societal factors such as resident preferences for tree traits, nursery offerings, and neighborhood characteristics are potentially key drivers of urban tree community composition and diversity, however they remain critically understudied. We investigated patterns of urban tree structure in residential neighborhoods of the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, combining biological variables, such as neighborhood and plant nursery tree species and...

Data from: Gigantic lion, (Panthera leo), from the Pleistocene of Natodomeri, eastern Africa

Fredrick K. Manthi, Francis H. Brown, Michael J. Plavcan & Lars Werdelin
The partial skull of a lion from Natodomeri, northwest Kenya is described. The Natodomeri sites are correlated with Member I of the Kibish Formation, dated to between 195 ka and ∼205 ka. The skull is remarkable for its very great size, equivalent to the largest cave lions (Panthera spelaea) of Pleistocene Eurasia and much larger than any previously known lion from Africa, living or fossil. We hypothesize that this individual represents a previously unknown population...

Data from: Validating genome-wide association candidates controlling quantitative variation in nodulation

Shaun J. Curtin, Peter Tiffin, Joseph Guhlin, Diana I. Trujillo, Liana T. Burghart, Paul Atkins, Nicholas J. Baltes, Roxanne Denny, Daniel F. Voytas, Robert M. Stupar, Nevin Dale Young & Liana T. Burghardt
Genome-wide association (GWA) studies offer the opportunity to identify genes that contribute to naturally occurring variation in quantitative traits. However, GWA relies exclusively on statistical association, so functional validation is necessary to make strong claims about gene function. We used a combination of gene-disruption platforms (Tnt1 retrotransposons, hairpin RNA-interference constructs, and CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases) together with randomized, well-replicated experiments to evaluate the function of genes that an earlier GWA study in Medicago truncatula had identified as...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    23

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    23

Affiliations

  • University of Utah
    23
  • Louisiana State University of Alexandria
    3
  • Utah State University
    2
  • University of California System
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • Smithsonian Institution
    2
  • University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
    2
  • University of California, Davis
    2
  • University of Montana
    1
  • Princeton University
    1