4 Works

Data from: Phantoms of the forest: legacy risk effects of a regionally extinct large carnivore

Ellinor Sahlén, Sonja Noell, Christopher S. DePerno, Jonas Kindberg, Göran Spong, Joris P. G. M. Cromsigt & Joris P.G.M. Cromsigt
The increased abundance of large carnivores in Europe is a conservation success, but the impact on the behavior and population dynamics of prey species is generally unknown. In Europe, the recolonization of large carnivores often occurs in areas where humans have greatly modified the landscape through forestry or agriculture. Currently, we poorly understand the effects of recolonizing large carnivores on extant prey species in anthropogenic landscapes. Here, we investigated if ungulate prey species showed innate...

Data from: Compensatory life history responses of a mesopredator may undermine carnivore management efforts

Liaan Minnie, Angela Gaylard & Graham I. H. Kerley
Lethal carnivore management, aimed at reducing carnivore impacts, is a global phenomenon threatening the persistence of many carnivores. Black-backed jackals Canis mesomelas, the dominant cause of livestock predation in southern Africa, are widely hunted to reduce livestock predation. Despite centuries of lethal management, jackals persist. Smaller canids, like jackals, are highly adaptable and display variable responses to mortality sources, which may affect management outcomes. The effects of killing carnivores will depend on their behaviour, social...

Data from: Sex-specific and individual preferences for hunting strategies in white sharks

Alison V. Towner, Vianey Leos-Barajas, Roland Langrock, Robert S. Schick, Malcolm J. Smale, Tami Kaschke, Oliver J.D. Jewell, Yannis P. Papastamatiou & Oliver J. D. Jewell
Fine-scale predator movements may be driven by many factors including sex, habitat, and distribution of resources. There may also be individual preferences for certain movement strategies within a population which can be hard to quantify. Within top predators, movements are also going to be directly related to the mode of hunting; for example sit-and-wait or actively searching for prey. Although there is mounting evidence that different hunting modes can cause opposing trophic cascades, there has...

Data from: How to capture fish in a school? Effect of successive predator attacks on seabird feeding success

Andréa Thiebault, Magali Semeria, Christophe Lett & Yann Tremblay
1. Prey aggregations, such as fish schools, attract numerous predators. This typically leads to the formation of multi-specific groups of predators. These aggregations can be seen both as a place of increased competition and as a place of possible facilitation between predators. Consequently, the functional role of such predator-prey aggregation is uncertain, and its effect on individual feeding success is virtually unknown. 2. Using underwater film footages of different predators feeding on fish schools during...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Nelson Mandela University
    4
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • Dyer Island Conservation Trust
    1
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    1
  • Rhodes University
    1
  • Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
    1
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    1
  • Bielefeld University
    1
  • University of St Andrews
    1
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    1