585 Works

Data from: Fine-root exploitation strategies differ in tropical old-growth and logged-over forests in Ghana

Shalom D. Addo-Danso, Cindy E. Prescott, Stephen Adu-Bredu, Akwasi Duah-Gyamfi, Sam Moore, Robert D. Guy, David I. Forrester, Kennedy Owusu-Afriyie, Peter L. Marshall, Yadvinder Malhi. & Yadvinder Malhi
Understanding the changes in root exploitation strategies during post-logging recovery is important for predicting forest productivity and carbon dynamics in tropical forests. We sampled fine (diameter < 2 mm) roots using the soil-core method to quantify fine-root biomass, and architectural and morphological traits to determine root exploitation strategies in an old-growth forest and in a 54-year-old logged-over forest influenced by similar parent material and climate. Seven root traits were considered: four associated with resource exploitation...

Data from: The combined impacts of experimental defaunation and logging on seedling traits and diversity

Alys Granados, Henry Bernard & Jedediah F. Brodie
Animals can have both positive (e.g. via seed dispersal) and negative (e.g. via herbivory) impacts on plants. The net effects of these interactions remain difficult to predict and may be affected by overhunting and habitat disturbance, two widespread threats to tropical forests. Recent studies have documented their separate effects on plant recruitment but our understanding of how defaunation and logging interact to influence tropical tree communities is limited. From 2013-2016, we followed the fate of...

Data for: Feedback between coevolution and epidemiology can help or hinder the maintenance of genetic variation in host-parasite models

Ailene MacPherson, Matthew Keeling & Sarah Otto
Antagonistic coevolution has long been suggested to help maintain host genetic variation. While, ecological and epidemiological feedbacks are known to have important consequences on coevolutionary allele frequency dynamics, their effects on the maintenance of genetic variation remains poorly understood.Here, we extend our previous work on the maintenance of genetic variation in a classic matching-alleles coevolutionary model by exploring the effects of ecological and epidemiological feedbacks, where both allele frequencies and population sizes are allowed to...

Genomic analyses of phenotypic differences between native and invasive populations of diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa)

Kathryn Turner, Kate Ostevik, Christopher Grassa & Loren Rieseberg
Invasive species represent excellent opportunities to study the evolutionary potential of traits important to success in novel environments. Although some ecologically-important traits have been identified in invasive species, little is typically known about the genetic mechanisms that underlie invasion success in non-model species. Here, we use a genome-wide association (GWAS) approach to identify the genetic basis of trait variation in the non-model, invasive, diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa Lam. [Asteraceae]). To assist with this analysis, we...

Data from: Priorities and motivations of marine coastal restoration research

Elisa Bayraktarov, Shantala Brisbane, Phoebe J Stewart-Sinclair, Audrey Van Herwaarden, Keila Stark, Valerie Hagger, Carter S Smith, Kerrie A Wilson, Catherine E Lovelock, Chris Gillies, Andrew D L Steven & Megan I Saunders
Active restoration is becoming an increasingly important conservation intervention to counteract the degradation of marine coastal ecosystems. Understanding what has motivated the scientific community to research the restoration of marine coastal ecosystems and how restoration research projects are funded is essential if we want to scale-up restoration interventions to meaningful extents.Here, we systematically review and synthesize data to understand the motivations for research on the restoration of coral reefs, seagrass, mangroves, saltmarsh, and oyster reefs....

Adaptation and latitudinal gradients in species interactions: nest predation in birds

Ben Freeman, Micah Scholer, Mannfred Boehm, Julian Heavyside & Dolph Schluter
Are rates of biotic interactions are stronger in the tropics? Here we investigate nest predation rates in birds, a canonical example of a strong tropical biotic interaction. Counter to expectations, daily rates of nest predation vary minimally with latitude. However, life history traits that influence nest predation have diverged between latitudes. For example, tropical species have evolved a longer average nesting period, which is associated with reduced rates of nest attendance by parents. Daily nest...

Hidden introductions of freshwater red algae via the aquarium trade exposed by DNA barcodes

Shing Zhan, Tsai-Yin Hsieh, Lan-Wei Yeh, Ting-Chun Kuo, Shoichiro Suda & Shao-Lun Liu
The global aquarium trade can introduce alien freshwater invaders, potentially impacting local aquatic ecosystems and their biodiversity. The role of the aquarium trade in spreading freshwater red macroalgae that hitchhike on ornamental aquatic plants and animals is unassessed. We investigated this human-mediated phenomenon via a broad biodiversity survey and genetic analysis of freshwater red algae in the field and aquarium shops in East Asia. Results We found 26 molecular operational taxonomic units (mOTUs) in Taiwan,...

Data from Beyond MAP: A guide to dimensions of rainfall variability for tropical ecology

Naomi Schwartz, Benjamin R. Lintner, Xue Feng & Jennifer S. Powers
Tropical ecologists have long recognized rainfall as the key climate filter shaping tropical ecosystem structure and function across space and time. Still, tropical ecologists have historically had a limited toolkit for characterizing rainfall, largely relying on simple metrics like mean annual precipitation (MAP) and dry season length to characterize rainfall regimes that vary along many more dimensions. Here, we review methods for quantifying dimensions of rainfall variability on multiple time scales, with a focus on...

Experimental hybridization studies suggest that pleiotropic alleles commonly underlie adaptive divergence between natural populations

Ken Thompson
The alleles used for adaptation can pleiotropically affect traits under stabilizing selection. The fixation of alleles with deleterious pleiotropic effects causes compensatory alleles to be favoured by selection. Such compensatory alleles might segregate in interpopulation hybrids, resulting in segregation variance for traits where parents have indistinguishable phenotypes. If adaptation typically involves pleiotropy and compensation, then the segregation variance for traits under stabilizing selection is expected to increase with the magnitude of adaptive phenotypic divergence between...

In situ resistance, not immigration, supports invertebrate community resilience to drought intensification in a Neotropical ecosystem

Camille Bonhomme, Régis Céréghino, Jean-François Carrias, Arthur Compin, Bruno Corbara, Vincent E.J. Jassey, Joséphine Leflaive, Vinicius F. Farjalla, Nicholas A. C. Marino, Thibaut Rota, Diane S. Srivastava & Céline Leroy
While future climate scenarios predict declines in precipitations in many regions of the world, little is known of the mechanisms underlying community resilience to prolonged dry seasons, especially in “naïve” Neotropical rainforests. Predictions of community resilience to intensifying drought are complicated by the fact that the underlying mechanisms are mediated by species’ tolerance and resistance traits, as well as rescue through dispersal from source patches. We examined the contribution of in situ tolerance-resistance and immigration...

Single cell transcriptomics of of Abedinium reveals a new early-branching dinoflagellate lineage

Elizabeth Cooney, Noriko Okamoto, Anna Cho, Elisabeth Hehenberger, Thomas Richards, Alexandra Worden, Alyson Santoro, Brian Leander & Patrick Keeling
Dinoflagellates possess many unique cellular characteristics with unresolved evolutionary histories including nuclei with greatly expanded genomes and chromatin packaged using histone-like proteins and dinoflagellate-viral nucleoproteins instead of histones, highly reduced mitochondrial genomes with extensive RNA editing, a mix of photosynthetic and cryptic secondary plastids, and tertiary plastids. Resolving the evolutionary origin of these traits requires understanding their ancestral states and early intermediates. Several deep-branching dinoflagellate lineages are good candidates for such reconstruction, however they tend...

UCE and Sanger sequenced data for phylogenetic analysis of jumping spiders (Baviini and Nungia, Salticidae)

Wayne Maddison
The systematics and taxonomy of the tropical Asian jumping spiders of the tribe Baviini is reviewed, with a molecular phylogenetic study (UCE sequence capture, traditional Sanger sequencing) guiding a reclassification of the group's genera. The well-studied members of the group are placed into six genera: Bavia Simon, 1877, Indopadilla Caleb & Sankaran, 2019, Padillothorax Simon, 1901, Piranthus Thorell, 1895, Stagetillus Simon, 1885, and one new genus, Maripanthus Maddison. The identity of Padillothorax is clarified, and...

COVID-19 clinician moral injury survey

David Barbic
Background Moral injury is an emerging explanation of burnout and suicidality, but remains poorly quantified in at-risk practitioners. We hypothesized that COVID-19 pandemic-related moral injury differs between frontline clinicians, genders, age, and country of practice. Methods We conducted an online cross-sectional survey of international physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, paramedics and respiratory therapists between April and June 2020. We included the adapted version of the Expressions of Moral Injury Scale (EMIS). The primary outcome was differences...

The sunflower (Helianthus annuusL.) genome reflects a recent history of biased accumulation of transposable elements

S. Evan Staton, Bradley H. Bakken, Benjamin K. Blackman, Mark A. Chapman, Nolan C. Kane, Shunxue Tang, Mark C. Ungerer, Steven J. Knapp, Loren H. Rieseberg & John M. Burke
Aside from polyploidy, transposable elements are the major drivers of genome size increases in plants. Thus, understanding the diversity and evolutionary dynamics of transposable elements in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), especially given its large genome size (∼3.5 Gb) and the well‐documented cases of amplification of certain transposons within the genus, is of considerable importance for understanding the evolutionary history of this emerging model species. By analyzing approximately 25% of the sunflower genome from random sequence...

Data from: Molecular underpinnings and biogeochemical consequences of enhanced diatom growth in a warming Southern Ocean

Loay Jabre, Andrew E. Allen, J. Scott P. McCain, John P. McCrow, Nancy Tenenbaum, Jenna L. Spackeen, Rachel E. Sipler, Beverley R. Green, Deborah A. Bronk, David A. Hutchins & Erin M. Bertrand
The Southern Ocean (SO) harbours some of the most intense phytoplankton blooms on Earth. Changes in temperature and iron availability are expected to alter the intensity of SO phytoplankton blooms, but little is known about how environmental change will influence community composition and downstream biogeochemical processes. We performed experimental manipulations on surface ocean microbial communities from McMurdo Sound in the Ross Sea, with and without iron addition, at -0.5 °C, 3 °C, and 6 °C....

Data from: Spatial patterns and rarity of the white-phased ‘Spirit Bear’ allele reveals gaps in habitat protection

Christina Service, Mathieu Bourbonnais, Megan Adams, Lauren Henson, Douglas Neasloss, Chris Picard, Paul Paquet & Chris Darimont
Preserving genetic and phenotypic diversity can help safeguard not only biodiversity but also cultural and economic values. Here, we present data that emerged from Indigenous-led research at the intersection of evolution and ecology to support conservation planning of a culturally salient, economically valuable, and rare phenotypic variant. We addressed three conservation objectives for the white-phased ‘Spirit bear’ polymorphism, a rare and endemic white-coated phenotype of black bear (Ursus americanus) in Kitasoo/Xai’xais and Gitga’at Territories and...

A catastrophic tropical drought kills hydraulically vulnerable tree species

Jennifer Powers, German Vargas-G, Timothy Brodribb, Naomi Schwartz, Daniel Perez-Aviles, Chris Smith-Martin, Justin Becknell, Filippo Aureli, Roger Blanco, Erick Calderón-Morales, Julio César Calvo-Alvarado, Ana Julieta Calvo-Obando, María Marta Chavarría, Dorian Carvajal-Vanegas, César Dionisio Jiménez-Rodríguez, Evin Murillo Chacon, Colleen Schaffner, Leland Werden, Xiangtao Xu & David Medvigy
Drought-related tree mortality is now a widespread phenomenon predicted to increase in magnitude with climate change. However, the patterns of which species and trees are most vulnerable to drought, and the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive, in part due to the lack of relevant data and difficulty of predicting the location of catastrophic drought years in advance. We used long‐term demographic records and extensive databases of functional traits and distribution patterns to understand the responses...

Hydroxyacetophenone defenses in white spruce against spruce budworm

Genevieve Parent, Claudia Méndez-Espinoza, Isabelle Giguère, Melissa H. Mageroy, Martin Charest, Éric Bauce, Joerg Bohlmann & John MacKay
We review a recently discovered white spruce (Picea glauca) chemical defense against spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) involving hydroxyacetophenones. These defense metabolites detected in the foliage accumulate variably as the aglycons, piceol and pungenol, or the corresponding glucosides, picein and pungenin. We summarize current knowledge of the genomic, molecular and biochemical as well as genetic underpinnings of this defense and its effects on C. fumiferana. We present an update with new results on the ontogenic variation...

Data from: Habitat size thresholds for predators: why damselflies only occur in large bromeliads

Diane Sheila Srivastava, Sarah Louise Amundrud, Jacqueline T. Ngai, Brian M. Starzomski & Jessica Lee Ware
Predators are often more sensitive to habitat size than their prey, and frequently occur in only the largest habitats. Four explanations have been proposed for this pattern: (1) small habitats do not have enough energy to support higher trophic levels; (2) small habitats are less likely to contain particular prey required by specialist predators; (3) small habitats are risky for predators with slow life histories or large body sizes; (4) small habitats are numerically unlikely...

Data from: City sicker? a meta-analysis of wildlife health and urbanization

Maureen H. Murray, Cecilia A. Sanchez, Daniel J. Becker, Kaylee A. Byers, Katherine E. L. Worsley-Tonks & Meggan E. Craft
Urban development can alter resource availability, land use, and community composition, in turn influencing wildlife health. Generalizable relationships between wildlife health and urbanization have yet to be quantified, and could vary across health metrics and animal taxonomy. We present a phylogenetic meta-analysis of 516 records spanning 81 wildlife species from 106 studies comparing the toxicant loads, parasitism, body condition, or stress of urban and non-urban wildlife populations in 30 countries. We find a significantly negative...

Data from: Density-dependent space use affects interpretation of camera trap detection rates

Kate Broadley, Cole Burton, Stan Boutin & Tal Avgar
Camera-traps (CTs) are an increasingly popular tool for wildlife survey and monitoring. Estimating relative abundance in unmarked species is often done using detection rate as an index of relative abundance, which assumes a positive linear relationship with true abundance. This assumption may be violated if movement behavior varies with density, but the degree to which movement is density-dependent across taxa is unclear. The potential confounding of population-level relative abundance indices by movement depends on how...

Assortative mating in hybrid zones is remarkably ineffective in promoting speciation

Darren Irwin
Partial prezygotic isolation is often viewed as more important than partial postzygotic isolation (low fitness of hybrids) early in the process of speciation. I simulate secondary contact between two populations (‘species’) to examine effects of assortative mating and low hybrid fitness in preventing blending. A small reduction in hybrid fitness (e.g., by 10%) produces a narrower hybrid zone than a strong but imperfect mating preference (e.g., 10x stronger preference for conspecific over heterospecific mates). In...

Data from: Partitioning genetic and species diversity refines our understanding of species-genetic diversity relationships

Vera W Pfeiffer, Brett M Ford, Johann Housset, Audrey McCombs, José L Blanco-Pastor, Nicolas Gouin, Stephanie Manel & Angéline Bertin
Illuminating the origin of species-genetic diversity correlations (SGDCs) is a challenging task that has sparked a lot of interest. Genetic and species diversity are comprised by components that respond differently to the same ecological processes. Thus, it can be useful to partition species and genetic diversity into their different components to infer the mechanisms behind SGDCs. In this study, we applied such an approach using a high-elevation Andean wetland system, where previous evidence identified neutral...

Data from: The effect of range overlap on ecological niche divergence depends on spatial scale in monkeyflowers

Qin Li, Dena L. Grossenbacher & Amy L. Angert
Patterns of niche divergence and geographical range overlap of closely related species provide insights into the evolutionary dynamics of ecological niches. When ranges overlap, shared selective pressures may preserve niche similarity along coarse‐scale macrohabitat axes (e.g., bioclimates). Alternatively, competitive interactions may drive greater divergence along local‐scale microhabitat axes (e.g., micro‐topographical features). We tested these hypotheses in 16 species pairs of western North American monkeyflowers (Erythranthe and Diplacus, formerly Mimulus) with species’ niches, geographic ranges and...

Data from: Chlorpyrifos interacts with other agricultural stressors to alter stream communities in laboratory microcosms

Ana M. Chara-Serna & John S. Richardson
Chlorpyrifos is one of the most widely used agricultural insecticides in the world, but to date there is limited empirical information about its potential to interact with other common agricultural stressors. We conducted a 15-day, community-level microcosm experiment evaluating individual and combined effects of chlorpyrifos, nutrient enrichment, and sedimentation on stream invertebrate communities (abundance, biomass, richness, size structure, composition) and ecosystem processes (primary productivity and leaf decomposition). We found that sedimentation was the most detrimental...

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