60 Works

Data from: Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia

Matthew E. Pamenter, Yvonne A. Dzal & William K. Milsom
Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O2 for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O2 min−1 kg−1,...

Data from: Testing a “genes-to-ecosystems” approach to understanding aquatic-terrestrial linkages

Gregory Crutsinger, Seth Rudman, Mariano Rodriguez-Cabal, Athena Mckown, Takuya Sato, Andrew M. MacDonald, Julian Heavyside, Armando Geraldes, Edmund Hart, Carri LeRoy, Rana El-Sabaawi, Athena D. McKown, Gregory M. Crutsinger, Seth M. Rudman, Mariano A. Rodriguez-Cabal, Edmund M. Hart, Carri J. LeRoy & Rana W. El-Sabaawi
A ‘genes-to-ecosystems’ approach has been proposed as a novel avenue for integrating the consequences of intraspecific genetic variation with the underlying genetic architecture of a species in order to shed light on the relationships among hierarchies of ecological organization (genes [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] individuals [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] communities [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] ecosystems). However, attempts to identify genes with major effect on the structure of communities and/or ecosystem processes have been limited and a comprehensive test of this approach...

Data from: Hummingbirds control hovering flight by stabilizing visual motion

Benjamin Goller & Douglas L. Altshuler
Relatively little is known about how sensory information is used for controlling flight in birds. A powerful method is to immerse an animal in a dynamic virtual reality environment to examine behavioral responses. Here, we investigated the role of vision during free-flight hovering in hummingbirds to determine how optic flow—image movement across the retina—is used to control body position. We filmed hummingbirds hovering in front of a projection screen with the prediction that projecting moving...

Data from: Genome scans reveal candidate domestication and improvement genes in cultivated sunflower, as well as post-domestication introgression with wild relatives.

Gregory J. Baute, Nolan C. Kane, Christopher J. Grassa, Zhao Lai & Loren H. Rieseberg
• The development of modern crops typically involves both selection and hybridization, but to date most studies have focused on the former. In the present study we explore how both processes, and their interactions, have molded the genome of the cultivated sunflower, a globally important oilseed. • To identify genes targeted by selection during the domestication and improvement of sunflower, and to detect post-domestication hybridization with wild species, we analyzed transcriptome sequences of 80 genotypes,...

Data from: Positive relationship between genetic- and species diversity on limestone outcrops in the Carpathian Mountains

Anna Mária Csergő, Levente Hufnagel & Mária Höhn
We asked if the genetic diversity of Saponaria bellidifolia (a habitat specialist plant) and the species diversity of its habitat are driven by parallel landscape-level processes in an island-like system of limestone outcrops in the Carpathian Mountains. We tested the relationship of these two diversity levels at local and regional geographic scales. Local genetic and species diversity showed parallel patterns influenced by the number of plant communities. Likewise, at regional level there was strong evidence...

Data from: Genomic divergence in a ring species complex

Miguel Alcaide, Elizabeth S. C. Scordato, Trevor D. Price & Darren E. Irwin
Ring species provide particularly clear demonstrations of how one species can gradually evolve into two, but are rare in nature. In the greenish warbler (Phylloscopus trochiloides) species complex, a ring of populations wraps around Tibet. Two reproductively isolated forms co-exist in central Siberia, with a gradient of genetic and phenotypic characteristics through the southern chain of populations connecting them. Previous genetic evidence has proven inconclusive, however, regarding whether species divergence took place in the face...

Data from: Female and male genetic effects on offspring paternity: additive genetic (co)variances in female extra-pair reproduction and male paternity success in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia)

Jane M. Reid, Peter Arcese, Lukas F. Keller & Sylvain Losdat
Ongoing evolution of polyandry, and consequent extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems, is hypothesised to be facilitated by indirect selection stemming from cross-sex genetic covariances with components of male fitness. Specifically, polyandry is hypothesised to create positive genetic covariance with male paternity success due to inevitable assortative reproduction, driving ongoing coevolution. However, it remains unclear whether such covariances could or do emerge within complex polyandrous systems. First, we illustrate that genetic covariances between female extra-pair...

Data from: Quantitative genetic analysis indicates natural selection on leaf phenotypes across wild tomato species (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon; Solanaceae)

Christopher D. Muir, James B. Pease & Leonie C. Moyle
Adaptive evolution requires both raw genetic material and an accessible path of high fitness from one fitness peak to another. In this study, we used an introgression line (IL) population to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for leaf traits thought to be associated with adaptation to precipitation in wild tomatoes (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon; Solanaceae). A QTL Sign Test showed that several traits likely evolved under directional natural selection. Leaf traits correlated across species do not...

Data from: Lineage fusion in Galápagos giant tortoises

Ryan C. Garrick, Edgar Benavides, Michael A. Russello, Chaz Hyseni, Danielle L. Edwards, James P. Gibbs, Washington Tapia, Claudio Ciofi & Adalgisa Caccone
Although many classic radiations on islands are thought to be the result of repeated lineage splitting, the role of past fusion is rarely known because during these events, purebreds are rapidly replaced by a swarm of admixed individuals. Here we capture lineage fusion in action in a Galápagos giant tortoise species, Chelonoidis becki, from Wolf Volcano (Isabela Island). The long generation time of Galápagos tortoises and dense sampling (841 individuals) of genetic and demographic data...

Data from: Reversed brain size sexual dimorphism accompanies loss of parental care in white sticklebacks

Kieran Samuk, Davis Iritani & Dolph Schluter
Uncovering factors that shape variation in brain morphology remains a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Recently, it has been shown that brain size is positively associated with level of parental care behavior in various taxa. One explanation for this pattern is that the cognitive demands of performing complex parental care may require increased brain size. This idea is known as the parental brain hypothesis (PBH). We set out to test the predictions of this hypothesis...

Data from: How much of the world is woody?

Richard G. FitzJohn, Matt W. Pennell, Amy E. Zanne, Peter F. Stevens, David C. Tank, William K. Cornwell & Matthew W. Pennell
1.The question posed by the title of this paper is a basic one, and it is surprising that the answer is not known. Recently assembled trait datasets provide an opportunity to address this, but scaling these datasets to the global scale is challenging because of sampling bias. Although we currently know the growth form of tens of thousands of species, these data are not a random sample of global diversity; some clades are exhaustively characterised,...

Data from: Jerzego, a new hisponine jumping spider from Borneo (Araneae: Salticidae)

Wayne P. Maddison & Edyta K. Piascik
A new genus and species of hisponine jumping spider from Sarawak, Jerzego corticicola Maddison sp. nov. are described, representing one of the few hisponine jumping spiders known from Asia, and the only whose male is known. Although similar to the primarily-Madagascan genus Hispo in having an elongate and flat body, sequences of 28s and 16sND1 genes indicate that Jerzego is most closely related to Massagris and Tomomingi, a result consistent with morphology. Females of Jerzego...

Data from: QST FST comparisons with unbalanced half-sib designs

Kimberly J. Gilbert & Michael C. Whitlock
QST, a measure of quantitative genetic differentiation among populations, is an index that can suggest local adaptation if QST for a trait is sufficiently larger than the mean FST of neutral genetic markers. A previous method by Whitlock and Guillaume derived a simulation resampling approach to statistically test for a difference between QST and FST, but that method is limited to balanced data sets with offspring related as half-sibs through shared fathers. We extend this...

Data from: Indirect genetic effects underlie oxygen-limited thermal tolerance within a coastal population of chinook salmon

Nicolas J. Muñoz, Katja Anttila, Zhongqi Chen, John W. Heath, Anthony P. Farrell, Bryan D. Neff & N. J. Munoz
With global temperatures projected to surpass the limits of thermal tolerance for many species, evaluating the heritable variation underlying thermal tolerance is critical for understanding the potential for adaptation to climate change. We examined the evolutionary potential of thermal tolerance within a population of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by conducting a full-factorial breeding design and measuring the thermal performance of cardiac function and the critical thermal maximum (CTmax) of offspring from each family. Additive genetic...

Data from: Social evolution in structured populations

Florence Débarre, Christoph Hauert & Michael Doebeli
Understanding the evolution of social behaviours such as altruism and spite is a long-standing problem that has generated thousands of articles and heated debates. Previous theoretical studies showed that whether altruism and spite evolve may be contingent on seemingly artificial model features, such as which rule is chosen to update the population (e.g., Birth-Death or Death-Birth), and whether the benefits and costs of sociality affect fecundity or survival. Here we unify these features in a...

Data from: Adaptive divergence along environmental gradients in a climate-change-sensitive mammal

P. Henry & M. A. Russello
In the face of predicted climate change, a broader understanding of biotic responses to varying environments has become increasingly important within the context of biodiversity conservation. Local adaptation is one potential option, yet remarkably few studies have harnessed genomic tools to evaluate the efficacy of this response within natural populations. Here we show evidence of selection driving divergence of a climate change-sensitive mammal, the American pika (Ochotona princeps), distributed along elevation gradients at its northern...

Data from: Landscape structure and the genetic effects of a population collapse

Serena A. Caplins, Kimberly J. Gilbert, Claudia Ciotir, Jens Roland, Stephen F. Matter & Nusha Keyghobadi
Both landscape structure and population size fluctuations influence population genetics. While independent effects of these factors on genetic patterns and processes are well studied, a key challenge is to understand their interaction, as populations are simultaneously exposed to habitat fragmentation and climatic changes that increase variability in population size. In a population network of an alpine butterfly, abundance declined 60–100% in 2003 because of low over-winter survival. Across the network, mean microsatellite genetic diversity did...

Data from: Divergent transcriptional patterns are related to differences in hypoxia tolerance between the intertidal and the subtidal sculpins

Milica Mandic, Marina L. Ramon, Andrew Y. Gracey & Jeffrey G. Richards
Transcriptionally mediated phenotypic plasticity as a mechanism of modifying traits in response to an environmental challenge remains an important area of study. We compared the transcriptional responses to low-oxygen (hypoxia) of the hypoxia tolerant intertidal fish, the tidepool sculpin (Oligocottus maculosus) with the closely related hypoxia intolerant subtidal fish, the silverspotted sculpin (Blepsias cirrhosus) to determine if these species use different mechanisms to cope with hypoxia. Individuals from each species were exposed to environmental O2...

Data from: Multiple plant traits shape the genetic basis of herbivore community assembly

Matthew A. Barbour, Mariano A. Rodriguez-Cabal, Elizabeth T. Wu, Riitta Julkunen-Tiitto, Carol E. Ritland, Allyson E. Miscampbell, Erik S. Jules & Gregory M. Crutsinger
1. Community genetics research has posited a genetic basis to the assembly of ecological communities. For arthropod herbivores in particular, there is strong support that genetic variation in host plants is a key factor shaping their diversity and composition. However, the specific plant phenotypes underlying herbivore responses remain poorly explored for most systems. 2. We address this knowledge gap by examining the influence of both genetic and phenotypic variation in a dominant host-plant species, Salix...

Data from: Transcriptome analysis indicates considerable divergence in alternative splicing between duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

David C. Tack, William R. Pitchers & Keith L. Adams
Gene and genome duplication events have created a large number of new genes in plants that can diverge by evolving new expression profiles and functions (neofunctionalization) or dividing extant ones (subfunctionalization). Alternative splicing (AS) generates multiple types of mRNA from a single type of pre-mRNA by differential intron splicing. It can result in new protein isoforms or down-regulation of gene expression by transcript decay. Using RNA-seq we investigated the degree to which alternative splicing patterns...

Data from: Immune response genes and pathogen presence predict migration survival in wild salmon smolts

Ken M. Jeffries, Scott G. Hinch, Marika Kirsten Gale, Timothy D. Clark, Andrew G. Lotto, Matthew T. Casselman, Shaorong Li, Erin L. Rechisky, Aswea D. Porter, David W. Welch, Kristina M. Miller & Marika Kirstin Gale
We present the first data to link physiological responses and pathogen presence with subsequent fate during migration of wild salmonid smolts. We tagged and non-lethally sampled gill tissue from sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) smolts as they left their nursery lake (Chilko Lake, BC, Canada) to compare gene expression profiles and freshwater pathogen loads with migration success over the first ~1150 km of their migration to the North Pacific Ocean using acoustic telemetry. Fifteen percent of...

Data from: Time scale matters: genetic analysis does not support adaptation-by-time as the mechanism for adaptive seasonal declines in kokanee reproductive lifespan

Yolanda E. Morbey, Evelyn L. Jensen & Michael A. Russello
Seasonal declines of fitness-related traits are often attributed to environmental effects or individual-level decisions about reproductive timing and effort, but genetic variation may also play a role. In populations of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), seasonal declines in reproductive life span have been attributed to adaptation-by-time, in which divergent selection for different traits occurs among reproductively isolated temporal components of a population. We evaluated this hypothesis in kokanee (freshwater obligate Oncorhynchus nerka) by testing for temporal...

Data from: The evolution of environmental tolerance and range size: a comparison of geographically restricted and widespread Mimulus

Seema Nayan Sheth & Amy L. Angert
The geographic ranges of closely related species can vary dramatically, yet we do not fully grasp the mechanisms underlying such variation. The niche breadth hypothesis posits that species that have evolved broad environmental tolerances can achieve larger geographic ranges than species with narrow environmental tolerances. In turn, plasticity and genetic variation in ecologically important traits and adaptation to environmentally variable areas can facilitate the evolution of broad environmental tolerance. We used five pairs of western...

Data from: Landscape genomics of Populus trichocarpa: the role of hybridization, limited gene flow and natural selection in shaping patterns of population structure

Armando J. M. Geraldes, Nima Farzaneh, Christopher J. Grassa, Athena D. McKown, Robert D. Guy, Shawn D. Mansfied, Carl J. Douglas, Quentin C. B. Cronk, Armando Geraldes & Shawn D. Mansfield
Populus trichocarpa is an ecologically important tree across western North America. We used a large population sample of 498 accessions over a wide geographical area genotyped with a 34K Populus SNP array to quantify geographical patterns of genetic variation in this species (landscape genomics). We present evidence that three processes contribute to the observed patterns: (1) introgression from the sister species P. balsamifera (2) isolation-by-distance and (3) natural selection. Introgression was detected only at the...

Data from: Genetic covariance between components of male reproductive success: within-pair versus extra-pair paternity in song sparrows

Jane M. Reid, Peter Arcese & Sylvain Losdat
The evolutionary trajectories of reproductive systems, including both male and female multiple mating and hence polygyny and polyandry, are expected to depend on the additive genetic variances and covariances in and among components of male reproductive success achieved through different reproductive tactics. However, genetic covariances among key components of male reproductive success have not been estimated in wild populations. We used comprehensive paternity data from socially monogamous but genetically polygynandrous song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    60

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    60

Affiliations

  • University of British Columbia
    60
  • University of Alberta
    5
  • University of Aberdeen
    4
  • Western University
    3
  • Indiana University Bloomington
    3
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    3
  • VU University Amsterdam
    2
  • State University of New York
    2
  • University of Guelph
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2