60 Works

Data from: Reversed brain size sexual dimorphism accompanies loss of parental care in white sticklebacks

Kieran Samuk, Davis Iritani & Dolph Schluter
Uncovering factors that shape variation in brain morphology remains a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Recently, it has been shown that brain size is positively associated with level of parental care behavior in various taxa. One explanation for this pattern is that the cognitive demands of performing complex parental care may require increased brain size. This idea is known as the parental brain hypothesis (PBH). We set out to test the predictions of this hypothesis...

Data from: Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia

Matthew E. Pamenter, Yvonne A. Dzal & William K. Milsom
Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O2 for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O2 min−1 kg−1,...

Data from: Positive relationship between genetic- and species diversity on limestone outcrops in the Carpathian Mountains

Anna Mária Csergő, Levente Hufnagel & Mária Höhn
We asked if the genetic diversity of Saponaria bellidifolia (a habitat specialist plant) and the species diversity of its habitat are driven by parallel landscape-level processes in an island-like system of limestone outcrops in the Carpathian Mountains. We tested the relationship of these two diversity levels at local and regional geographic scales. Local genetic and species diversity showed parallel patterns influenced by the number of plant communities. Likewise, at regional level there was strong evidence...

Data from: Lineage fusion in Galápagos giant tortoises

Ryan C. Garrick, Edgar Benavides, Michael A. Russello, Chaz Hyseni, Danielle L. Edwards, James P. Gibbs, Washington Tapia, Claudio Ciofi & Adalgisa Caccone
Although many classic radiations on islands are thought to be the result of repeated lineage splitting, the role of past fusion is rarely known because during these events, purebreds are rapidly replaced by a swarm of admixed individuals. Here we capture lineage fusion in action in a Galápagos giant tortoise species, Chelonoidis becki, from Wolf Volcano (Isabela Island). The long generation time of Galápagos tortoises and dense sampling (841 individuals) of genetic and demographic data...

Data from: Conservation and divergence of gene expression plasticity following c. 140 million years of evolution in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and interior spruce (Picea glauca × Picea engelmannii)

Sam Yeaman, Kathryn A. Hodgins, Haktan Suren, Kristin A. Nurkowski, Jason A. Holliday, Loren H. Rieseberg & Sally N. Aitken
Species respond to environmental stress through a combination of genetic adaptation and phenotypic plasticity, both of which may be important for survival in the face of climatic change. By characterizing the molecular basis of plastic responses and comparing patterns among species, it is possible to identify how such traits evolve. Here, we use de novo transcriptome assembly and RNA-seq to explore how patterns of gene expression differ in response to temperature, moisture, and light regime...

Data from: Genomic divergence in a ring species complex

Miguel Alcaide, Elizabeth S. C. Scordato, Trevor D. Price & Darren E. Irwin
Ring species provide particularly clear demonstrations of how one species can gradually evolve into two, but are rare in nature. In the greenish warbler (Phylloscopus trochiloides) species complex, a ring of populations wraps around Tibet. Two reproductively isolated forms co-exist in central Siberia, with a gradient of genetic and phenotypic characteristics through the southern chain of populations connecting them. Previous genetic evidence has proven inconclusive, however, regarding whether species divergence took place in the face...

Data from: Genome scans reveal candidate domestication and improvement genes in cultivated sunflower, as well as post-domestication introgression with wild relatives.

Gregory J. Baute, Nolan C. Kane, Christopher J. Grassa, Zhao Lai & Loren H. Rieseberg
• The development of modern crops typically involves both selection and hybridization, but to date most studies have focused on the former. In the present study we explore how both processes, and their interactions, have molded the genome of the cultivated sunflower, a globally important oilseed. • To identify genes targeted by selection during the domestication and improvement of sunflower, and to detect post-domestication hybridization with wild species, we analyzed transcriptome sequences of 80 genotypes,...

Data from: Testing a “genes-to-ecosystems” approach to understanding aquatic-terrestrial linkages

Gregory Crutsinger, Seth Rudman, Mariano Rodriguez-Cabal, Athena Mckown, Takuya Sato, Andrew M. MacDonald, Julian Heavyside, Armando Geraldes, Edmund Hart, Carri LeRoy, Rana El-Sabaawi, Athena D. McKown, Gregory M. Crutsinger, Seth M. Rudman, Mariano A. Rodriguez-Cabal, Edmund M. Hart, Carri J. LeRoy & Rana W. El-Sabaawi
A ‘genes-to-ecosystems’ approach has been proposed as a novel avenue for integrating the consequences of intraspecific genetic variation with the underlying genetic architecture of a species in order to shed light on the relationships among hierarchies of ecological organization (genes [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] individuals [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] communities [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] ecosystems). However, attempts to identify genes with major effect on the structure of communities and/or ecosystem processes have been limited and a comprehensive test of this approach...

Data from: Isotopic variation ccross the Audubon’s-myrtle warbler hybrid zone

David P. L. Toews, Alan Brelsford & Darren E. Irwin
Differences in seasonal migratory behaviours are thought to be an important component of reproductive isolation in many organisms. Stable isotopes have been used with success in estimating the location and qualities of disjunct breeding and wintering areas. However, few studies have used isotopic data to estimate the movements of hybrid offspring in species that form hybrid zones. Here, we use stable hydrogen to estimate the wintering locations and migratory patterns of two common and widespread...

Data from: Population structure of mountain pine beetle symbiont Leptographium longiclavatum and the implication on the multipartite beetle-fungi relationships

Clement Kin-Ming Tsui, Lina Farfan, Amanda D. Roe, Adrianne V. Rice, Janice E. K. Cooke, Yousry A. El-Kassaby & Richard C. Hamelin
Over 18 million ha of forests have been destroyed in the past decade in Canada by the mountain pine beetle (MPB) and its fungal symbionts. Understanding their population dynamics is critical to improving modeling of beetle epidemics and providing potential clues to predict population expansion. Leptographium longiclavatum and Grosmannia clavigera are fungal symbionts of MPB that aid the beetle to colonize and kill their pine hosts. We investigated the genetic structure and demographic expansion of...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    60

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    60

Affiliations

  • University of British Columbia
    60
  • University of Alberta
    5
  • University of Aberdeen
    4
  • Western University
    3
  • Indiana University Bloomington
    3
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    3
  • VU University Amsterdam
    2
  • State University of New York
    2
  • University of Guelph
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2