57 Works

Data from: Gene expression plasticity in response to salinity acclimation in threespine stickleback ecotypes from different salinity habitats

Taylor C. Gibbons, David C. H. Metzger, Timothy M. Healy & Patricia M. Schulte
Phenotypic plasticity is thought to facilitate the colonization of novel environments and shape the direction of evolution in colonizing populations. However, the relative prevalence of various predicted patterns of changes in phenotypic plasticity following colonization remain unclear. Here we use a whole-transcriptome approach to characterize patterns of gene expression plasticity in the gills of a freshwater-adapted and a saltwater-adapted ecotype of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) exposed to a range of salinities. The response of the...

Data from: Aggressive behaviours, food deprivation and the foraging gene

Silu Wang & Marla B. Sokolowski
A pleiotropic gene governs multiple traits, which might constrain the evolution of complexity due to conflicting selection on these traits. However, if the pleiotropic effect is modular, then this can facilitate synergistic responses to selection on functionally related traits, thereby leveraging the evolution of complexity. To understand the evolutionary consequence of pleiotropy, the relation among functionally different traits governed by the same gene is key. We examined a pleiotropic function of the foraging (for) gene...

Data from: Using experimentation to understand the 10-year snowshoe hare cycle in the boreal forest of North America

Charles Krebs, Rudy Boonstra, Stan Boutin & Charles J. Krebs
1. Population cycles have long fascinated ecologists from the time of Charles Elton in the 1920s. The discovery of large population fluctuations in undisturbed ecosystems challenged the idea that pristine nature was in a state of balance. The 10-year cycle of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus Erxleben) across the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska is a classic cycle, recognized by fur traders for more than 300 years. 2. Since the 1930s ecologists have investigated the...

Data from: The genetic architecture of UV floral patterning in sunflower

Brook T. Moyers, Gregory L. Owens, Gregory J. Baute & Loren H. Rieseberg
Background and Aims: The patterning of floral ultraviolet (UV) pigmentation varies both intra- and interspecifically in sunflowers and many other plant species, impacts pollinator attraction, and can be critical to reproductive success and crop yields. However, the genetic basis for variation in UV patterning is largely unknown. This study examines the genetic architecture for proportional and absolute size of the UV bullseye in Helianthus argophyllus, a close relative of the domesticated sunflower. Methods: A camera...

Data from: Form–function relationships in a marine foundation species depend on scale: a shoot to global perspective from a distributed ecological experiment

Jennifer L. Ruesink, John J. Stachowicz, Pamela L. Reynolds, Christoffer Boström, Mathieu Cusson, James Douglass, Johan Eklöf, Aschwin H. Engelen, Masakazu Hori, Kevin Hovel, Katrin Iken, Per-Olav Moksnes, Masahiro Nakaoka, Mary I. O'Connor, Jeanine L. Olsen, Erik E. Sotka, Matthew A. Whalen & Emmett J. Duffy
Form-function relationships in plants underlie their ecosystem roles in supporting higher trophic levels through primary production, detrital pathways, and habitat provision. For widespread, phenotypically-variable plants, productivity may differ not only across abiotic conditions, but also from distinct morphological or demographic traits. A single foundation species, eelgrass (Zostera marina), typically dominates north temperate seagrass meadows, which we studied across 14 sites spanning 32-61° N latitude and two ocean basins. Body size varied by nearly two orders...

Data from: No evidence of inbreeding depression in sperm performance traits in wild song sparrows

Sylvain Losdat, Ryan R. Germain, Pirmin Nietlisbach, Peter Arcese & Jane M. Reid
Inbreeding is widely hypothesized to shape mating systems and population persistence, but such effects will depend on which traits show inbreeding depression. Population and evolutionary consequences could be substantial if inbreeding decreases sperm performance and hence decreases male fertilisation success and female fertility. However, the magnitude of inbreeding depression in sperm performance traits has rarely been estimated in wild populations experiencing natural variation in inbreeding. Further, the hypothesis that inbreeding could increase within-ejaculate variation in...

Data from: Linking the wintering and breeding grounds of warblers along the Pacific Flyway

David P. L. Toews, Julian Heavyside & Darren E. Irwin
Long-distance migration is a behavior that is exhibited by many animal groups. The evolution of novel migration routes can play an important role in range expansions, ecological interactions, and speciation. New migration routes may evolve in response to selection in favor of reducing distance between breeding and wintering areas, or avoiding navigational barriers. Many migratory changes are likely to evolve gradually and are therefore difficult to study. Here, we attempt to connect breeding and wintering...

Data from: Evolution and plasticity: divergence of song discrimination is faster in birds with innate song than in song learners in Neotropical passerine birds

Benjamin G. Freeman, Graham A. Montgomery & Dolph Schluter
Plasticity is often thought to accelerate trait evolution and speciation. For example, plasticity in birdsong may partially explain why clades of song learners are more diverse than related clades with innate song. This “song learning” hypothesis predicts that 1) differences in song traits evolve faster in song learners, and 2) behavioral discrimination against allopatric song (a proxy for premating reproductive isolation) evolves faster in song learners. We tested these predictions by analyzing acoustic traits and...

Data from: A genome-wide phylogeny of jumping spiders (Araneae, Salticidae), using anchored hybrid enrichment

Wayne P. Maddison, Samuel C. Evans, Chris A. Hamilton, Jason E. Bond, Alan R. Lemmon & Emily Moriarty Lemmon
We present the first genome-wide molecular phylogeny of jumping spiders (Araneae: Salticidae), inferred from Anchored Hybrid Enrichment (AHE) sequence data. From 12 outgroups plus 34 salticid taxa representing all but one subfamily and most major groups recognized in previous work, we obtained 447 loci totalling 96,946 aligned nucleotide sites. Our analyses using concatenated likelihood, parsimony, and coalescent methods (ASTRAL and SVDQuartets) strongly confirm most previous results, resolving as monophyletic the Spartaeinae, Salticinae (with the hisponines...

Data from: Evolution of movement rate increases the effectiveness of marine reserves for the conservation of pelagic fishes

Jonathan A. Mee, Sarah P. Otto & Daniel Pauly
Current debates about the efficacy of no-take marine reserves (MR) in protecting large pelagic fish such as tuna and sharks have usually not considered the evolutionary dimension of this issue, which emerges because the propensity to swim away from a given place, like any other biological trait, will probably vary in a heritable fashion among individuals. Here, based on spatially-explicit simulations, we investigated whether selection to remain in MRs to avoid higher fishing mortality can...

Data from: Macroevolutionary synthesis of flowering plant sexual systems

Emma E. Goldberg, Sarah P. Otto, Jana C. Vamosi, Itay Mayrose, Niv Sabath, Ray Ming & Tia-Lynn Ashman
Sexual system is a key determinant of genetic variation and reproductive success, affecting evolution within populations and within clades. Much research in plants has focused on evolutionary transitions away from the most common state of hermaphroditism and toward the rare state of dioecy (separate sexes). Rather than transitions predominantly toward greater sexual differentiation, however, evolution may proceed in the direction of lesser sexual differentiation. We analyzed the macroevolutionary dynamics of sexual system in angiosperm genera...

Data from: Assessing the potential of genotyping-by-sequencing-derived single nucleotide polymorphisms to identify the geographic origins of intercepted gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) specimens: a proof-of-concept study

Sandrine Picq, Melody Keena, Nathan Havill, Don Stewart, Esther Pouliot, Brian Boyle, Roger C. Levesque, Richard C. Hamelin & Michel Cusson
Forest invasive alien species are a major threat to ecosystem stability and can have enormous economic and social impacts. For this reason, preventing the introduction of Asian gypsy moths (AGM; Lymantria dispar asiatica and L. d. japonica) into North America has been identified as a top priority by North American authorities. The AGM is an important defoliator of a wide variety of hardwood and coniferous trees, displaying a much broader host range and an enhanced...

Data from: Towards an integrated database on Canadian ocean resources: benefits, current states, and research gaps

Andrés M. Cisneros-Montemayor, William Wai Lung Cheung, Karin Bodtker, Louise Teh, Nadja Steiner, Morgan Bailey, Carie Hoover & Ussif Rashid Sumaila
Oceanic ecosystem services support a range of human benefits, and Canada has extensive research networks producing growing data sets. We present a first effort to compile, link, and harmonize available information to provide new perspectives on the status of Canadian ocean ecosystems and corresponding research. The metadata database currently includes 1094 individual assessments and data sets from government (n = 716), nongovernment (n = 320), and academic sources (n = 58), comprising research on marine...

Data from: Estimations of evapotranspiration in an age sequence of Eucalyptus plantations in subtropical China

Wenfei Liu, Jianping Wu, Houbao Fan, Honglang Duan, Qiang Li, Yinghong Yuan & Hao Zhang
Eucalyptus species are widely planted for reforestation in subtropical China. However, the effects of Eucalyptus plantations on the regional water use remain poorly understood. In an age sequence of 2-, 4- and 6-year-old Eucalyptus plantations, the tree water use and soil evaporation were examined by linking model estimations and field observations. Results showed that annual evapotranspiration of each age sequence Eucalyptus plantations was 876.7, 944.1 and 1000.7 mm, respectively, accounting for 49.81%, 53.64% and 56.86%...

Data from: Rates of hypoxia induction alter mechanisms of O2 uptake and the critical O2 tension of goldfish

Matthew D. Regan & Jeffrey G. Richards
The rate of hypoxia induction (RHI) is an important but overlooked dimension of environmental hypoxia that may affect an organism’s survival. We hypothesized that, compared with rapid RHI, gradual RHI will afford an organism more time to alter plastic phenotypes associated with O2 uptake and subsequently reduce the critical O2 tension (Pcrit) of O2 uptake rate (ṀO2). We investigated this by determining Pcrit values for goldfish exposed to short (∼24 min), typical (∼84 min) and...

Data from: Effects of gene action, marker density, and time since selection on the performance of landscape genomic scans of local adaptation

Jeremy B. Yoder & Peter Tiffin
Genomic “scans” to identify loci that contribute to local adaptation are becoming increasingly common. Many methods used for such studies have assumed that local adaptation is created by loci experiencing antagonistic pleiotropy and that the selected locus itself is assayed, and few consider how signals of selection change through time. However, most empirical data sets have marker density too low to assume that a selected locus itself is assayed, researchers seldom know when selection was...

Data from: Mechanisms of thermal adaptation and evolutionary potential of conspecific populations to changing environments

Zhongqi Chen, Anthony P. Farrell, Amanda Matala & Shawn R. Narum
Heterogeneous and ever-changing thermal environments drive the evolution of populations and species, especially when extreme conditions increase selection pressure for traits influencing fitness. However, projections of biological diversity under scenarios of climate change rarely consider evolutionary adaptive potential of natural species. In this study, we tested for mechanistic evidence of evolutionary thermal adaptation among ecologically divergent redband trout populations (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) in cardiorespiratory function, cellular response and genomic variation. In a common garden environment,...

Data from: Light and growth form interact to shape stomatal ratio among British angiosperms

Christopher D. Muir
In most plants, stomata are located only on the abaxial leaf surface (hypostomy), but many plants have stomata on both surfaces (amphistomy). High light and herbaceous growth form have been hypothesized to favor amphistomy, but these hypotheses have not been rigorously tested together using phylogenetic comparative methods. I leveraged a large dataset including stomatal ratio, Ellenberg light indicator value, growth form and phylogenetic relationships for 372 species of British angiosperms. I used phylogenetic comparative methods...

Data from: Keeping pace with the Red Queen: identifying the genetic basis of susceptibility to infectious disease

Ailene MacPherson, Sarah P. Otto & Scott L. Nuismer
Genome-wide association studies are widely used to identify "disease genes" conferring resistance/susceptibility to infectious diseases. Using a combination of mathematical models and simulations we demonstrate that genetic interactions between hosts and parasites (GxG interactions) can drastically affect the results of these association scans and hamper our ability to detect genetic variation in susceptibility. When hosts and parasites coevolve, these GxG interactions often make Genome-wide association studies unrepeatable over time or across host populations. Reanalyzing previously...

Data from: A review of riverine ecosystem service quantification: research gaps and recommendations

Dalal E. L. Hanna, Stephanie A. Tomscha, Camille Ouellet Dallaire & Elena M. Bennett
1.Increasing demand for benefits provided by riverine ecosystems threatens their sustainable provision. The ecosystem service concept is a promising avenue to inform riverine ecosystem management, but several challenges have prevented the application of this concept. 2.We quantitatively assess the field of riverine ecosystem services’ progress in meeting these challenges. We highlight conceptual and methodological gaps, which have impeded integration of the ecosystem service concept into management. 3.Across 89 relevant studies, 33 unique riverine ecosystem services...

Data from: Portable device for the detection of colorimetric assays

George S. Luka, Ephriam Nowak, Jamie Kawchuk, Mina Hoorfar & Homayoun Najjaran
In this work, a low-cost, portable device is developed to detect colorimetric assays for in-field and point-of-care (POC) analysis. The device can rapidly detect both pH values and nitrite concentrations of 5 different samples, simultaneously. After mixing samples with specific reagents, a Hi-resolution digital camera collects a picture of the sample, and a single-board computer processes the image in real time to identify the hue-saturation-value (HSV) coordinates of the image. An internal light source reduces...

Data from: Genetic coupling of female mate choice with polygenic ecological divergence facilitates stickleback speciation

Rachael A. Bay, Matthew E. Arnegard, Gina L. Conte, Jacob Best, Nicole L. Bedford, Shaugnessy R. McCann, Matthew E. Dubin, Yingguang Frank Chan, Felicity C. Jones, David M. Kingsley, Dolph Schluter & Catherine L. Peichel
Ecological speciation with gene flow is widespread in nature, but it presents a conundrum: how are associations between traits under divergent natural selection and traits that contribute to assortative mating maintained? Theoretical models suggest that genetic mechanisms inhibiting free recombination between loci underlying these two types of traits (hereafter, “genetic coupling”) can facilitate speciation. Here, we perform a direct test for genetic coupling by mapping both divergent traits and female mate choice in a classic...

Data from: High throughput sequencing of small RNAs reveals dynamic microRNAs expression of lipid metabolism during Camellia oleifera and C. meiocarpa seed natural drying

Jin-Ling Feng, Zhi-Jian Yang, Shi-Pin Chen, Yousry El-Kassaby & Hui Chen
Background: Camellia species are ancient oilseed plants with a history of cultivation over two thousand years. Prior to oil extraction, natural seed drying is often practiced, a process affecting fatty acid quality and quantity. MicroRNAs (miRNA) of lipid metabolism associated with camellia seed natural drying are unexplored. To obtain insight into the function of miRNAs in lipid metabolism during natural drying, Illumina sequencing of C. oleifera and C. meiocarpa small-RNA was conducted. Results: A total...

Data from: Genetic and genomic evidence of niche partitioning and adaptive radiation in mountain pine beetle fungal symbionts

Dario I. Ojeda Alayon, Clement K. M. Tsui, Nicolas Feau, Arnaud Capron, Braham Dhillon, Zhang Yiyuan, Sepideh Massoumi Alamouti, Celia K. Boone, Allan L. Carroll, Janice E.K. Cooke, Amanda D. Roe, Felix A. H. Sperling, Richard C. Hamelin, Janice E. K. Cooke & Yiyuan Zhang
Bark beetles form multipartite symbiotic associations with blue stain fungi (Ophiostomatales, Ascomycota). These fungal symbionts play an important role during the beetle's life cycle by providing nutritional supplementation, overcoming tree defences and modifying host tissues to favour brood development. The maintenance of stable multipartite symbioses with seemingly less competitive symbionts in similar habitats is of fundamental interest to ecology and evolution. We tested the hypothesis that the coexistence of three fungal species associated with the...

Data from: Group elicitations yield more consistent, yet more uncertain experts in understanding risks to ecosystem services in New Zealand bays

Gerald G. Singh, Jim Sinner, Joanne Ellis, Milind Kandlikar, Benjamin S. Halpern, Terre Satterfield & Kai Chan
The elicitation of expert judgment is an important tool for assessment of risks and impacts in environmental management contexts, and especially important as decision-makers face novel challenges where prior empirical research is lacking or insufficient. Evidence-driven elicitation approaches typically involve techniques to derive more accurate probability distributions under fairly specific contexts. Experts are, however, prone to overconfidence in their judgements. Group elicitations with diverse experts can reduce expert overconfidence by allowing cross-examination and reassessment of...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    57

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    57

Affiliations

  • University of British Columbia
    57
  • University of Toronto
    5
  • University of Montana
    3
  • University of Alberta
    3
  • Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University
    3
  • University of California System
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    2
  • Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resource Operations
    2
  • University of Calgary
    2