90 Works

Exchange Rate Pass-Through, Currency of Invoicing and Market Share

Michael B. Devereux, Wei Dong & Ben Tomlin
This paper investigates the impact of market structure on the joint determination of exchange rate pass-through and currency of invoicing in international trade. A novel feature of the study is the focus on market share of firms on both sides of the market—that is, exporting firms and importing firms. A model of monopolistic competition with heterogeneous firms has the following set of predictions: a) exchange rate pass-through should be non-monotonic and U-shaped in the market...

Woodpeckers and other excavators maintain the diversity of cavity-nesting vertebrates

M. Kurtis Trzcinski, Kristina Cockle, Andrea Norris, Max Edworthy, Karen Wiebe & Kathy Martin
Woodpeckers and other excavators create most of the holes used by secondary tree-cavity nesting vertebrates (SCNs) in North American temperate mixedwood forests, but the degree to which excavators release SCNs from nest-site limitation is debated. Our goal was to quantify how excavators maintain the diversity and abundance of secondary cavity nesters in a temperate forest through the creation of tree cavities. We examined the short- and long-term (legacy) effects of excavators (principally woodpeckers, but also...

Clinician-researcher’s perspectives on clinical research during the COVID-19 pandemic

Sarah Silverberg, Lisa Puchalski-Ritchie, Nina Gobat, Alistair Nichol & Srinavas Murthy
Objectives: The outcome of well-performed clinical research is essential for evidence-based patient management during pandemics. However, conducting clinical research amidst a pandemic requires researchers to balance clinical and research demands. We seek to understand the values, experiences, and beliefs of physicians working at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in order to inform clinical research planning. We aim to understand whether pandemic settings affect physician comfort with research practices, and how physician experiences shape their...

Data for: Nectar-dwelling microbes of common tansy are attractive to its mosquito pollinator, Culex pipiens

Daniel Peach, C. Carroll, S. Meraj, S. Gomes, E. Galloway, A. Balcita, H. Coatsworth, N. Young, Y. Uriel, R. Gries, C. Lowenberger, M. Moore & G. Gries
There is widespread interkingdom signalling between insects and microbes. For example, microbes found in floral nectar may modify its nutritional composition and produce odorants that alter the floral odor bouquet which may attract insect pollinators. Mosquitoes consume nectar and can pollinate flowers. We identified microbes isolated from nectar of common tansy, Tanacetum vulgare , identified the microbial odorants, and tested their effect on attracting the common house mosquito, Culex pipiens . Results We collected 19...

Adherence to wearing facemasks during the COVID-19 pandemic

Steven Taylor & Gordon Asmundson
This study reports a comprehensive empirical investigation of the nature and correlates of anti-mask attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Accumulating evidence underscores the importance of facemasks, as worn by the general public, in limiting the spread of infection. Accordingly, mask wearing has become increasingly mandatory in public places such as stores and on public transit. Although the public has been generally adherent to mask wearing, a small but vocal group of individuals refuse to wear...

Dark Extinction: Bird dataset

Quentin Cronk
The extinction of species before they are discovered and named (dark extinction) is widely inferred as a significant part of species loss in the early modern period (1500-1800). The discovery of oceanic islands and other pristine habitats by European navigators and the consequent introduction of rodents and herbivores started a process of anthropogenic extinction. Much ecosystem change happened before systematic scientific recording, so has led to dark extinction. Methods are available to robustly estimate dark...

Changes in arthropod community but not plant quality benefit a specialist herbivore on plants under reduced water availability

Po-An Lin, Chia-Ming Liu, Jia-Ang Ou, Cheng-Han Sun, Wen-Po Chuang, Chuan-Kai Ho, Natsuko Kinoshita & Gary Felton
Plants growing under reduced water availability can affect insect herbivores differently, in some instances benefitting them. However, the forces mediating these positive impacts remain mostly unclear. To identify how water availability impacts plant quality and multitrophic interactions, we conducted manipulative field studies with two populations of the specialist herbivore Pieris rapae, and its host plant, Rorippa indica. We found that P. rapae larvae experienced higher survival on R. indica growing under low water availability compared...

Aquatic biodiversity enhances multiple nutritional benefits to humans

Joey R. Bernhardt & Mary I. O'Connor
Humanity depends on biodiversity for health, well-being and a stable environment. As biodiversity change accelerates, we are still discovering the full range of consequences for human health and well-being. Here, we test the hypothesis -- derived from biodiversity - ecosystem functioning theory -- that species richness and ecological functional diversity allow seafood diets to fulfill multiple nutritional requirements, a condition necessary for human health. We analyzed a newly synthesized dataset of 7245 observations of nutrient...

Data and code for: Infected juvenile salmon can experience increased predation during freshwater migration

Nathan Furey, Arthur Bass, Kristi Miller, Shaorong Li, Andrew Lotto, Stephen Healy, S Matthew Drenner & Scott Hinch
This submission constitutes the data and code for the manuscript titled "Infected juvenile salmon can experience increased predation during freshwater migration" submitted by Furey et al. It includes R code for conducting analyses, a custom-built R package (authored by Bass) for conducting analyses, data files, R objects for predicting fish lengths, and sample metadata on juvenile sockeye salmon smolts that were sampled. Please see the file "DryadData_titles_and_captions_RSOS_Furey_et_al" for list of file names included.

Species interactions limit the predictability of community responses to environmental change

Patrick Thompson, Samuel Hürlemann & Florian Altermatt
Predicting how ecological communities respond to environmental change is challenging, but highly relevant in this global change era. Ecologists commonly use current spatial relationships between species and environmental conditions to make predictions about the future. This assumes that species will track conditions by shifting their distributions. However, theory and experimental evidence suggest that species interactions prevent communities from predictably tracking temporal changes in environmental conditions, based on current spatial relationships between species and environmental gradients....

Ongoing production of low-fitness hybrids limits range overlap between divergent cryptic species

Else Mikkelsen & Darren Irwin
Contact zones between recently-diverged taxa provide opportunities to examine the causes of reproductive isolation and the processes that determine whether two species can coexist over a broad region. The Pacific Wren (Troglodytes pacificus) and Winter Wren (Troglodytes hiemalis) are two morphologically similar songbirds that started diverging about 4 million years ago, older than most sister species pairs of temperate songbirds. The ranges of these species come into narrow contact in western Canada, where the two...

Predators override rainfall effects on tropical food webs

Fabiola Ospina, Diane Srivastava, Angélica González, Jed Sparks & Emilio Realpe
Predators alter ecological communities by inducing changes in prey abundance and phenotypes, including elemental and isotopic composition. Climatic factors are known to often moderate predator effects on prey abundance, but few studies consider the combined effects of climate and predators on prey phenotype. We examined how altered precipitation moderates the effects of predators on the abundance and the chemical composition of prey, as well as the indirect effects on the basal resource: leaf litter coated...

How latex film formation and adhesion at the nanoscale correlate to performance of pressure sensitive adhesives with cellulose nanocrystals

Elina Niinivaara, Alexandra Ouzas, Carole Fraschini, Richard M. Berry, Marc A. Dubé & Emily D. Cranston
Emulsion polymerized latex-based pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are more environmentally benign because they are synthesized in water but often underperform compared to their solution polymerized counterparts. Studies have shown a simultaneous improvement in the tack, and peel and shear strength of various acrylic PSAs upon the addition of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). This work uses atomic force microscopy (AFM) to examine the role of CNCs in (i) the coalescence of hydrophobic 2‐ethyl hexyl acrylate/n‐butyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate...

Argos and GPS data for a polar bear track

Marie Auger-Méthé & Andrew E. Derocher
It is rare to be able to validate state-space models for Argos data. This dataset provides a unique opportunity to do so, because it contains simultaneous Argos and GPS data for a polar bear. The GPS locations are extremely accurate (≤30 m) compared to Argos data, which can have errors as large as 36 km depending on the quality class. The dataset contains one year of movement data, starting on April 20, 2009. The dataset...

Adaptation across geographic ranges is consistent with strong selection in marginal climates and legacies of range expansion

Megan Bontrager, Takuji Usui, Julie Lee-Yaw, Daniel Anstett, Haley Branch, Anna Hargreaves, Christopher Muir & Amy Angert
Every species experiences limits to its geographic distribution. Some evolutionary models predict that populations at range edges are less well-adapted to their local environments due to drift, expansion load, or swamping gene flow from the range interior. Alternatively, populations near range edges might be uniquely adapted to marginal environments. In this study, we use a database of transplant studies that quantify performance at broad geographic scales to test how local adaptation, site quality, and population...

Progressive neurochemical abnormalities in cognitive and motor subgroups of ALS: a prospective multicentre study

Daniel Ta, Abdullah Ishaque, Ojas Srivastava, Chris Hanstock, Peter Seres, Dean Eurich, Collin Luk, Hannah Briemberg, Richard Frayne, Angela Genge, Simon Graham, Lawrence Korngut, Lorne Zinman & Sanjay Kalra
Objective: To evaluate progressive cerebral degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by assessing alterations in N-acetylaspartate (NAA) ratios in the motor and prefrontal cortex within clinical subgroups of ALS. Methods: Seventy-six ALS patients and 59 healthy controls were enrolled a prospective, longitudinal, multicenter study in the Canadian ALS Neuroimaging Consortium (CALSNIC). Participants underwent serial clinical evaluations and MRS at baseline, 4 and 8 months using a harmonized protocol across 5 centers. NAA ratios were quantified...

Multispecies modelling reveals potential for habitat restoration to re-establish boreal vertebrate community dynamics

Christopher Beirne, Catherine Sun, Erin Tattersall, Joanna Burgar, Jason Fisher & Cole Burton
1. The restoration of habitats degraded by industrial disturbance is essential for achieving conservation objectives in disturbed landscapes. In boreal ecosystems, disturbances from seismic exploration lines and other linear features have adversely affected biodiversity, most notably leading to declines in threatened woodland caribou. Large-scale restoration of disturbed habitats is needed, yet empirical assessments of restoration effectiveness on wildlife communities remain rare. 2. We used 73 camera trap deployments from 2015-2019 and joint species distribution models...

Data from: Descriptive multi-agent epidemiology via molecular screening on Atlantic salmon farms in the northeast Pacific Ocean

Andrew Bateman, Angela D. Schulze, Karia H. Kaukinen, Amy Tabata, Gideon Mordecai, Kelsey Flynn, Arthur Bass, Emiliano Di Cicco & Kristina M. Miller
Rapid expansion of salmon aquaculture has resulted in high-density populations that host diverse infectious agents, for which surveillance and monitoring are critical to disease management. Screening can reveal infection diversity from which disease arises, differential patterns of infection in live and dead fish that are difficult to collect in wild populations, and potential risks associated with agent transmission between wild and farmed hosts. We report results from a multi-year infectious-agent screening program of farmed salmon...

Response of Avian communities to edges of tropical montane forests: Implications for the future of endemic habitat specialists

Jill Jankowski, Keiller Kyle, Matthew Gasner, Anna Ciecka & Kerry Rabenold
Tropical montane landscapes harbor diverse flora and fauna, and many species there are ecological specialists with narrow elevational distributions, limited geographic ranges, and small global populations. Along elevational gradients, environmental conditions and community composition change dramatically over small spatial scales. As forests are disturbed and edges formed with modified habitat, natural communities could be affected differently across elevations by the many physical and biotic changes at edges. We asked whether forest edges produced altered patterns...

Data from: Genome-wide analysis reveals demographic and life history patterns associated with habitat modification in land-locked, deep-spawning sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

Farida Samad-Zada, Brett Van Poorten, Shannon Harris, Lyse Godbout & Michael Russello
Human-mediated habitat fragmentation in freshwater ecosystems can negatively impact genetic diversity, demography and life history of native biota, while disrupting the behaviour of species that are dependent on spatial connectivity to complete their life cycles. In the Alouette River system (British Columbia, Canada), dam construction in 1928 impacted passage of anadromous sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), with the last records of migrants occurring in the 1930’s. Since that time, O. nerka persisted as a resident population...

Analysis of ancestry heterozygosity suggests that hybrid incompatibilities in threespine stickleback are environment-dependent

Ken Thompson, Catherine Peichel, Diana Rennison, Matthew McGee, Arianne Albert, Timothy Vines, Anna Greenwood, Abigail Wark, Yaniv Brandvain, Molly Schumer & Dolph Schluter
Hybrid incompatibilities occur when interactions between opposite-ancestry alleles at different loci reduce the fitness of hybrids. Most work on incompatibilities has focused on those that are 'intrinsic', meaning they affect viability and sterility in the laboratory. Theory predicts that ecological selection can also underlie hybrid incompatibilities, but tests of this hypothesis using sequence data are scarce. In this article, we compiled genetic data for F2 hybrid crosses between divergent populations of threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus...

Economies of scale shape energetics of solitary and group living spiders and their webs

Samantha Straus, Angélica Gonzalez, Philip Matthews & Leticia Avilés
Metabolic scaling, whereby larger individuals use less energy per unit mass than smaller ones, may apply to the combined metabolic rate of group-living organisms as group size increases. Spiders that form groups in high disturbance environments can serve to test the hypothesis that economies of scale benefit social groups. Using solitary and group-living spiders, we tested the hypothesis that spiders exhibit negative allometry between body or colony mass and the standing mass of their webs...

Data from: Global origins of invasive brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) in the Haida Gwaii archipelago

Bryson Sjodin, Emily Puckett, Robyn Irvine, Jason Munshi-South & Michael Russello
Brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) have commensally spread from northern China and Mongolia to become among the most invasive species on the planet. Understanding the proximate source(s) of invasion can inform biosecurity plans and eradication strategies for preventing or mitigating impacts to native biodiversity. The Haida Gwaii archipelago, located off the coast of British Columbia, Canada, is a significant nesting site for 1.5 million seabirds across 12 species, half of which are now threatened by brown...

Enabling conditions for an equitable and sustainable blue economy

Andrés M. Cisneros-Montemayor, Marcia Moreno-Baez, Gabriel Reygondeau, William W.L. Cheung, Katherine M. Crosman, Pedro C. Gonzalez-Espinosa, Vicky W.Y. Lam, Muhammed A. Oyinlola, Gerald G. Singh, Wilf Swartz, Yoshitaka Ota & Chong-Wei Zheng
The future of the global ocean economy is currently envisioned as an advancement towards a ‘Blue Economy’—socially equitable, environmentally sustainable, and economically viable ocean industries. However, there are current tensions between development discourses from perspectives of natural capital versus social equity and environmental justice. Here we show there are stark differences in Blue Economy outlooks when social conditions and governance capacity beyond resource availability are considered, and highlight limits to establishing multiple overlapping industries. The...

Participatory Mapping Reveals Sociocultural Drivers of Forest Fires in Protected Areas of the Post-Conflict Colombian Amazon

Charles Tebbutt, Tahia Devisscher, Laura Obando-Cabrera, Gustavo Adolfo Gutiérrez García, María Meza Elizalde, Dolors Armenteras & Imma Oliveras
1. Wildfires have increased in protected areas (PAs) of the Colombian Amazon following the 2016 peace agreement between the Government and the Revolutionary Armed Forced of Colombia (FARC – Spanish acronym). Recent study efforts to understand this issue suffer from data scarcity and limited consultation of local stakeholder perspectives on factors affecting wildfires. 2. This study uses a social-ecological systems framework to investigate local perceptions of factors driving and / or preventing wildfires in the...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    90

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    83
  • Text
    4
  • Journal Article
    2
  • Book
    1

Affiliations

  • University of British Columbia
    90
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    6
  • Simon Fraser University
    5
  • University of Toronto
    5
  • University of Washington
    4
  • University of Minnesota
    4
  • Stanford University
    3
  • The Nature Conservancy
    3
  • University of Alberta
    3
  • Dalhousie University
    3