3 Works

Data from: Outlier SNPs detect weak regional structure against a background of genetic homogeneity in the Eastern Rock Lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi

Laura N. Woodings, Nicholas P. Murphy, Stephen R. Doyle, Nathan E. Hall, Andrew J. Robinson, Geoffrey W. Liggins, Bridget S. Green, Ira R. Cooke, James J. Bell & Jan M. Strugnell
Genetic differentiation is characteristically weak in marine species making assessments of population connectivity and structure difficult. However the advent of genomic methods have increased genetic resolution, enabling studies to detect weak, but significant population differentiation within marine species. With an increasing number of studies employing high resolution genome-wide techniques, we are realising the connectivity of marine populations is often complex and quantifying this complexity can provide an understanding of the processes shaping marine species genetic...

Data from: Below-ground processes control the success of an invasive seaweed

Paul E. Gribben, Torsten Thomas, Antonio Pusceddu, Lisa Bonechi, Silvia Bianchelli, Emanuela Buschi, Shaun Nielsen, Chiara Ravaglioli & Fabio Bulleri
1. Whilst the successful establishment and spread of invasive species can be determined by above ground processes, results are often equivocal. Emergent research, mostly from terrestrial ecosystems, demonstrates that below-ground processes (nutrient cycling, chemical properties) under microbial control can mediate interactions between native and invasive plants. Because microbes can control similar sediment properties in marine ecosystem that influence plant fitness, we argue that below-ground properties should also exert strong control interactions between native and invasive...

Data from: Latitudinal variation in seagrass herbivory: global patterns and explanatory mechanisms

Adriana Vergés, Christopher Doropoulos, Rob Czarnik, Kathryn McMahon, Nil Llonch & Alistair G. B. Poore
Aim: The aim was to quantify latitudinal patterns in seagrass–herbivore interactions in the context of a warming climate. Location: We carried out a global meta‐analysis combined with a field experiment across 1,700 km and 12° of latitude in Western Australia. Time period: 1984–2014. Major taxa studied: Seagrasses. Methods: We first synthesized the global literature on herbivore exclusion experiments in seagrasses to test whether differences in herbivore impacts are related to latitude and sea surface temperature....

Registration Year

  • 2018
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Sydney Institute of Marine Science
    3
  • UNSW Sydney
    2
  • University of Cagliari
    1
  • Victoria University of Wellington
    1
  • University of Tasmania
    1
  • La Trobe University
    1
  • University of Barcelona
    1
  • Wellcome Trust
    1
  • University of Pisa
    1
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    1