195 Works

Data from: Population differentiation of 2 forms of Bryde’s whales in the Indian and Pacific Oceans

Francine Kershaw, Matthew S. Leslie, Tim Collins, Rubaiyat M. Mansur, Brian D. Smith, Gianna Minton, Robert Baldwin, Richard G. LeDuc, R. Charles Anderson, & Howard C. Rosenbaum
Accurate identification of units for conservation is particularly challenging for marine species as obvious barriers to gene flow are generally lacking. Bryde’s whales (Balaenoptera spp.) are subject to multiple human-mediated stressors, including fisheries bycatch, ship strikes, and scientific whaling by Japan. For effective management, a clear understanding of how populations of each Bryde’s whale species/subspecies are genetically structured across their range is required. We conducted a population-level analysis of mtDNA control region sequences with 56...

Data from: Is sexual selection driving diversification of the bioluminescent ponyfishes (Teleostei: Leiognathidae)?

Prosanta Chakrabarty, Matthew P Davis, W. Leo Smith, Zachary H Baldwin & John S Sparks
Sexual selection is a mechanism of speciation that theoretically could provide genetic isolation among populations and lead to an increase in diversification rates. In this study, we investigate the impact of potential sexual selection on the tempo and mode of ponyfish evolution. Ponyfishes (Leiognathidae) are bioluminescent marine fishes that exhibit sexually-dimorphic features of their unique light-organ system (LOS). Given that some leiognathid species have a sexually dimorphic LOS, whereas others do not, this family provides...

Data from: The early diversification history of didelphid marsupials: a window into South America’s “Splendid Isolation”

Sharon A. Jansa, F. Keith Barker & Robert S. Voss
The geological record of South American mammals is spatially biased because productive fossil sites are concentrated at high latitudes. As a result, the history of mammalian diversification in Amazonia and other tropical biomes is largely unknown. Here we report diversification analyses based on a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of opossums (Didelphidae), a species-rich clade of mostly tropical marsupials descended from a Late Oligocene common ancestor. Optimizations of habitat and geography on this phylogeny suggest that (1)...

Data from: Using terrestrial haematophagous leeches to enhance tropical biodiversity monitoring programmes in Bangladesh

Sarah R. Weiskopf, Kyle P. McCarthy, Michael Tessler, Hasan A. Rahman, Jennifer L. McCarthy, Rebecca Hersch, Mohammad M. Faisal & Mark E. Siddall
1. Measuring mammal biodiversity in tropical rainforests is challenging, and methods which reduce effort while maximizing success are crucial for long-term monitoring programmes. Commonly used methods to assess mammal biodiversity may require substantial sampling effort to be effective. Genetic methods are a new and important sampling tool on the horizon, but obtaining sufficient DNA samples can be a challenge. 2. We evaluated the efficacy of using parasitic leeches Haemadipsa spp., as compared to camera trapping,...

Data from: Ecological divergence and sexual selection drive sexual size dimorphism in new world pitvipers (Serpentes: Viperidae)

Catriona R. Hendry, Timothy J. Guiher & Robert A. Pyron
Hypotheses for the origin and maintenance of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) fall into three primary categories: (i) sexual selection on male size, (ii) fecundity selection on female size and (iii) ecological selection for gender-specific niche divergence. We investigate the impact of these forces on SSD evolution in New World pitvipers (Crotalinae). We constructed a phylogeny from up to eight genes (seven mitochondrial, one nuclear) for 104 species of NW crotalines. We gathered morphological and ecological...

Data from: Estimating synchronous demographic changes across populations using hABC and its application for a herpetological community from northeastern Brazil

Marcelo Gehara, Adrian Antoinio Garda, Fernanda P. Werneck, Eliana F. Oliveira, Emanuel M. Da Fonseca, Felipe Camurugi, Felipe De M. Magalhães, Flavia Mol Lanna, Jack W. Sites, Ricardo Marques, Ricardo Silveira-Filho, Vinícius A. São-Pedro, Guarino R. Colli, Gabriel C. Costa & Frank T. Burbrink
Many studies propose that Quaternary climatic cycles contracted and /or expanded the ranges of species and biomes. Strong expansion-contraction dynamics of biomes presume concerted demographic changes of associated fauna. The analysis of temporal concordance of demographic changes can be used to test the influence of Quaternary climate on diversification processes. Hierarchical approximate Bayesian computation (hABC) is a powerful and flexible approach that models genetic data from multiple species, and can be used to estimate the...

Data from: Host specificity shapes population structure of pinworm parasites in Caribbean reptiles

Bryan G. Falk & Susan L. Perkins
Host specificity is one of the potential factors affecting parasite diversification because gene flow may be facilitated or constrained by the number of host species that a parasite can exploit. We test this hypothesis using a costructure approach, comparing two sympatric pinworm parasites that differ in host specificity – Parapharyngodon cubensis and Spauligodon anolis – on the Puerto Rican Bank and St. Croix in the Caribbean. Spauligodon anolis specializes on Anolis lizards, whereas P. cubensis...

Data from: Quantifying the human impacts on Papua New Guinea reef fish communities across space and time

Joshua A. Drew, Ruth A. Hufbauer & Kathryn L. Amatangelo
Describing the drivers of species loss and of community change are important goals in both conservation and ecology. However, it is difficult to determine whether exploited species decline due to direct effects of harvesting or due to other environmental perturbations brought about by proximity to human populations. Here we quantify differences in species richness of coral reef fish communities along a human population gradient in Papua New Guinea to understand the relative impacts of fishing...

Data from: Taxon cycle predictions supported by model-based inference in Indo-Pacific trap-jaw ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Odontomachus)

Pável Matos-Maraví, Nicholas J. Matzke, Fredrick J. Larabee, Ronald M. Clouse, Ward C. Wheeler, Daniela Magdalena Sorger, Andrew V. Suarez & Milan Janda
Non-equilibrium dynamics and non-neutral processes, such as trait-dependent dispersal, are often missing from quantitative island biogeography models despite their potential explanatory value. One of the most influential non-equilibrium models is the taxon cycle, but it has been difficult to test its validity as a general biogeographical framework. Here, we test predictions of the taxon-cycle model using six expected phylogenetic patterns and a time-calibrated phylogeny of Indo-Pacific Odontomachus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae), one of the ant genera...

Data from: Feeding capability in the extinct giant Siamogale melilutra and comparative mandibular biomechanics of living Lutrinae

Z. Jack Tseng, Denise F. Su, Xiaoming Wang, Stuart C. White & Xueping Ji
At 50 kg in estimated weight, the extinct Siamogale melilutra is larger than all living otters, and ranks among the largest fossil otters. The biomechanical capability of S. melilutra jaws as related to their large size is unknown but crucial to reconstructing the species’ potentially unique ecological niche. Here we compare the mandibular biomechanics of S. melilutra using engineering-based performance measures against ten extant otter biomechanical models. Despite a wide range of feeding preferences from...

Data from: Laetoli footprints reveal bipedal gait biomechanics different from those of modern humans and chimpanzees

Kevin G. Hatala, Brigitte Demes & Brian G. Richmond
Bipedalism is a key adaptation that shaped human evolution, yet the timing and nature of its evolution remain unclear. Here we use new experimentally based approaches to investigate the locomotor mechanics preserved by the famous Pliocene hominin footprints from Laetoli, Tanzania. We conducted footprint formation experiments with habitually barefoot humans and with chimpanzees to quantitatively compare their footprints to those preserved at Laetoli. Our results show that the Laetoli footprints are morphologically distinct from those...

Data from: Genetics of urban colonization: neutral and adaptive variation in coyotes (Canis latrans) inhabiting the New York metropolitan area

Alexandra L. DeCandia, Carol S. Henger, Amelia Krause, Linda J. Gormezano, Mark Weckel, Christopher Nagy, Jason Munshi-South & Bridgett M. VonHoldt
Theory predicts that range expansion results in genetic diversity loss in colonizing populations. Rapid reduction of population size exacerbates negative effects of genetic drift, while sustained isolation decreases neutral variation. Amid this demographic change, natural selection can act to maintain functional diversity. Thus, characterizing neutral and functional variation is critical for disentangling the evolutionary forces that shape genetic variation in newly established populations. Coyotes (Canis latrans) provide an ideal study system for examining the genetic...

Data from: Tectonic collision and uplift of Wallacea triggered the global songbird radiation

Robert G. Moyle, Carl H. Oliveros, Michael J. Andersen, Peter A. Hosner, Brett W. Benz, Joseph D. Manthey, Scott L. Travers, Rafe M. Brown & Brant C. Faircloth
Songbirds (oscine passerines) are the most species rich and cosmopolitan bird group, comprising almost half of global avian species diversity. Because of their diversity and ubiquity, songbirds are used extensively in studies of evolutionary ecology, diversification, and ethology. Songbirds originated in Australia, but the evolutionary trajectory from a single species in an isolated continent to worldwide proliferation is poorly understood. Prior research suggested songbird diversification scenarios that are largely uncoupled from Earth history, including extensive...

Data from: Differences in caste dimorphism among three hornet species (Hymenoptera: Vespidae): forewing size, shape and allometry

Adrien Perrard, Claire Villemant, James M. Carpenter & Michel Baylac
Caste shape dimorphism (CShD) has previously been studied in wasps through comparison of different body parts, originating from different imaginal discs. Using geometric morphometrics with a new protocol for measuring wings of pinned specimens from natural history collections, we tested CShD of three hornet species in an organ developed from a single imaginal disc: the forewing. Gaussian Mixture Models retrieved most castes and species levels confirming that caste is an important component of wing variations...

Data from: Range-wide snow leopard phylogeography supports three subspecies

Jan E. Janecka, Yu-Quang Zhang, Di-Qiang Li, Munkhtsog Bariushaa, Bayaraa Munkhtsog, Galsandorj Naranbaatar, Wangchuk R. Tshewang, Karmacharya Dibesh, McCarthy Thomas, Li Juan, Zhi Lu, Zhumabai Uulu Kubanychbek, Gaur Ajay, Kumar Satish, B. Kumar Kesav, Hussain Shafqat, Muhammad Ghulam, Jevit Matthew, Hacker Charlotte, Burger Pamela, Wultsch Claudia, Janecka J. Mary, Helgen Kristofer, Murphy J. William & Jackson Rodney
The snow leopard, Panthera uncia, is an elusive high-altitude specialist that inhabits vast, inaccessible habitat across Asia. We conducted the first range-wide genetic assessment of snow leopards based on noninvasive scat surveys. Thirty-three microsatellites were genotyped and a total of 683-bp of mitochondrial DNA sequenced in 70 individuals. Snow leopards exhibited low genetic diversity at microsatellites (AN = 5.8, HO = 0.433, HE = 0.568), virtually no mtDNA variation, and underwent a bottleneck in the...

Data from: Identifying heterogeneity in rates of morphological evolution: discrete character change in the evolution of lungfish (Sarcopterygii; Dipnoi)

Graeme T Lloyd, Steve C Wang & Stephen L Brusatte
Quantifying rates of morphological evolution is important in many macroevolutionary studies, and critical when assessing possible adaptive radiations and episodes of punctuated equilibrium in the fossil record. However, studies of morphological rates of change have lagged behind those on taxonomic diversification, and most authors have focused on continuous characters and quantifying patterns of morphological rates over time. Here, we provide a phylogenetic approach, using discrete characters and three statistical tests to determine points on a...

Data from: Genetic diversity and population structure of Mesoamerican jaguars (Panthera onca): implications for conservation and management

Claudia Wultsch, Anthony Caragiulo, Isabela Dias-Freedman, Howard Quigley, Salisa Rabinowitz & George Amato
Mesoamerican jaguars (Panthera onca) have been extirpated from over 77% of their historic range, inhabiting fragmented landscapes at potentially reduced population sizes. Maintaining and restoring genetic diversity and connectivity across human-altered landscapes has become a major conservation priority; nonetheless large-scale genetic monitoring of natural populations is rare. This is the first regional conservation genetic study of jaguars to primarily use fecal samples collected in the wild across five Mesoamerican countries: Belize, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras,...

Data from: Evolutionary changes in pubic orientation in dinosaurs are more strongly correlated with the ventilation system than with herbivory

Loredana Macaluso & Emanuel Tschopp
Among dinosaurs, the pubis has convergently retroverted four times in Maniraptora (Theropoda) and once in Ornithischia. Although a clear correlation has not been demonstrated, it has been previously proposed that two traits were related to pubic retroversion: the reduced importance of cuirassal ventilation, and a herbivorous diet. Here, we analyse the possible influence of these traits on pubis orientation. Cuirassal ventilation was plesiomorphically present as an accessory ventilation mechanism in Dinosauria and was powered by...

Data from: Livestock abundance predicts vampire bat demography, immune profiles, and bacterial infection risk

Daniel J. Becker, Gábor Á. Czirják, Dmitriy V. Volokhov, Alexandra B. Bentz, Jorge E. Carrera, Melinda S. Camus, Kristen J. Navara, Vladimir E. Chizhikov, M. Brock Fenton, Nancy B. Simmons, Sergio E. Recuenco, Amy T. Gilbert, Sonia Altizer & Daniel G. Streicker
Human activities create novel food resources that can alter wildlife–pathogen interactions. If resources amplify or dampen pathogen transmission likely depends on both host ecology and pathogen biology, but studies that measure responses to provisioning across both scales are rare. We tested these relationships with a four-year study of 369 common vampire bats across ten sites in Peru and Belize that differ in the abundance of livestock, an important anthropogenic food source. We quantified innate and...

Data from: From success to persistence: Identifying an evolutionary regime shift in the diverse Paleozoic aquatic arthropod group Eurypterida, driven by the Devonian biotic crisis

James C. Lamsdell & Paul A. Selden
Mass extinctions have altered the trajectory of evolution a number of times over the Phanerozoic. During these periods of biotic upheaval a different selective regime appears to operate, although it is still unclear whether consistent survivorship rules apply across different extinction events. We compare variations in diversity and disparity across the evolutionary history of a major Paleozoic arthropod group, the Eurypterida. Using these data, we explore the group's transition from a successful, dynamic clade to...

Data from: Assessing support for Blaberoidea phylogeny suggests optimal locus

Dominic Evangelista, Sabrina Simon, Megan M. Wilson, Akito Y. Kawahara, Manpreet K. Kohli, Jessica L. Ware, Benjamin Wipfler, Olivier Béthoux, Grandcolas Philippe & Frédéric Legendre
Phylogenomics seeks to use next-generation data to robustly infer an organism’s evolutionary history. Yet, the practical caveats of phylogenomics motivates investigation of improved efficiency, particularly when quality of phylogenies are questionable. To achieve improvements, one goal is to maintain or enhance the quality of phylogenetic inference while severely reducing dataset size. We approach this by assessing which kinds of loci in phylogenomic alignments provide the majority of support for a phylogenetic inference of cockroaches in...

Population genetic structure of the insular Ryukyu flying fox Pteropus dasymallus

Shiang-Fan Chen, Chung-Hao Juan, Stephen J. Rossiter, Teruo Kinjo, Dai Fukui, Kuniko Kawai, Susan M. Tsang, Maria Josefa Veluz, Hiroko Sakurai, Hua-Ching Lin, Nian-Hong Jang-Liaw, Keiko Osawa, Wen-Ya Ko & Masako Izawa
Small isolated populations are vulnerable to both stochastic events and the negative consequences of genetic drift. For threatened species, the genetic management of such populations has therefore become a crucial aspect of conservation. Flying foxes (Pteropus spp, Chiroptera) are keystone species with essential roles in pollination and seed dispersal in tropical and subtropical ecosystems. However, many flying fox species are also threatened, having experienced dramatic population declines driven by habitat loss and hunting. The insular...

Data from: Spatial overlap in a solitary carnivore: support for the land-tenure, kinship, or resource dispersion hypotheses?

L. Mark Elbroch, Patrick E. Lendrum, Howard Quigley & Anthony Caragiulo
1. There are several alternative hypotheses about the effects of territoriality, kinship, and prey availability on individual carnivore distributions within populations. The first is the land-tenure hypothesis, which predicts that carnivores regulate their density through territoriality and temporal avoidance. The second is the kinship hypothesis, which predicts related individuals will be clumped within populations, and the third is the resource dispersion hypothesis, which suggests that resource richness may explain variable sociality, spatial overlap, or temporary...

Data from: Predicting community structure in snakes on Eastern Nearctic islands using ecological neutral theory and phylogenetic methods

Frank T. Burbrink, Alexander D. McKelvy, R. Alexander Pyron & Edward A. Myers
Predicting species presence and richness on islands is important for understanding the origins of communities and how likely it is that species will disperse and resist extinction. The equilibrium theory of island biogeography (ETIB) and, as a simple model of sampling abundances, the unified neutral theory of biodiversity (UNTB), predict that in situations where mainland to island migration is high, species-abundance relationships explain the presence of taxa on islands. Thus, more abundant mainland species should...

Data from: Resolution of a Supertree/Supermatrix Paradox

John Gatesy, Conrad Matthee, Rob DeSalle & Cheryl Hayashi
Gatesy et al Data SetSuperArtio-1.dat

Registration Year

  • 2021
    20
  • 2020
    30
  • 2019
    15
  • 2018
    23
  • 2017
    22
  • 2016
    22
  • 2015
    23
  • 2014
    13
  • 2013
    10
  • 2012
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    195

Affiliations

  • American Museum of Natural History
    195
  • City University of New York
    19
  • Queens College, CUNY
    17
  • National Museum of Natural History
    9
  • University of Kansas
    7
  • Louisiana State University
    7
  • Smithsonian Institution
    6
  • University of Florida
    6
  • Stony Brook University
    6
  • Louisiana State University of Alexandria
    5