217 Works

Data from: Assessing support for Blaberoidea phylogeny suggests optimal locus

Dominic Evangelista, Sabrina Simon, Megan M. Wilson, Akito Y. Kawahara, Manpreet K. Kohli, Jessica L. Ware, Benjamin Wipfler, Olivier Béthoux, Grandcolas Philippe & Frédéric Legendre
Phylogenomics seeks to use next-generation data to robustly infer an organism’s evolutionary history. Yet, the practical caveats of phylogenomics motivates investigation of improved efficiency, particularly when quality of phylogenies are questionable. To achieve improvements, one goal is to maintain or enhance the quality of phylogenetic inference while severely reducing dataset size. We approach this by assessing which kinds of loci in phylogenomic alignments provide the majority of support for a phylogenetic inference of cockroaches in...

Population genetic structure of the insular Ryukyu flying fox Pteropus dasymallus

Shiang-Fan Chen, Chung-Hao Juan, Stephen J. Rossiter, Teruo Kinjo, Dai Fukui, Kuniko Kawai, Susan M. Tsang, Maria Josefa Veluz, Hiroko Sakurai, Hua-Ching Lin, Nian-Hong Jang-Liaw, Keiko Osawa, Wen-Ya Ko & Masako Izawa
Small isolated populations are vulnerable to both stochastic events and the negative consequences of genetic drift. For threatened species, the genetic management of such populations has therefore become a crucial aspect of conservation. Flying foxes (Pteropus spp, Chiroptera) are keystone species with essential roles in pollination and seed dispersal in tropical and subtropical ecosystems. However, many flying fox species are also threatened, having experienced dramatic population declines driven by habitat loss and hunting. The insular...

Data for: Theoretical and practical considerations when using retroelement insertions to estimate species trees in the anomaly zone

Erin Molloy, John Gatesy & Mark Springer
A potential shortcoming of concatenation methods for species tree estimation is their failure to account for incomplete lineage sorting. Coalescent methods address this problem but make various assumptions that, if violated, can result in worse performance than concatenation. Given the challenges of analyzing DNA sequences with both concatenation and coalescent methods, retroelement insertions (RIs) have emerged as powerful phylogenomic markers for species tree estimation. Here, we show that two recently proposed quartet-based methods, SDPquartets and...

Subpopulation contributions to a breeding metapopulation of migratory Arctic herbivores: Survival, fecundity, and asymmetric dispersal

Ray Alisauskas, Anna Calvert, James Leafloor, Robert Rockwell, Kiel Drake, Dana Kellett, Rod Brook & Kenneth Abraham
Estimates of demographic parameters for lesser snow geese (Anser caerulescens caerulescens) have become critical to understand ecosystem change in northern Canada. Exponential increase in abundance has produced hyperdensities of these herbivores that can affect Arctic ecosystem stability through intense foraging. Increased and sustained marking of individually-identifiable lesser snow geese over their breeding distribution now permits joint estimation of local vital rates and movement probabilities among widely scattered subpopulations. We used multi-state models, including an unobservable...

Ecological and evolutionary drivers of hemoplasma infection and genotype sharing in a Neotropical bat community

Daniel Becker, Kelly Speer, Alexis Brown, Alex Washburne, Brock Fenton, Sonia Altizer, Daniel Streicker, Raina Plowright, Vladimir Chizhikov, Nancy Simmons & Dmitriy Volokhov
Most emerging pathogens can infect multiple species, underscoring the importance of understanding the ecological and evolutionary factors that allow some hosts to harbor greater infection prevalence and share pathogens with other species. However, our understanding of pathogen jumps is primarily based around viruses, despite bacteria accounting for the greatest proportion of zoonoses. Because bacterial pathogens in bats (Order: Chiroptera) can have conservation and human health consequences, studies that examine the ecological and evolutionary drivers of...

Data from: Tectonic collision and uplift of Wallacea triggered the global songbird radiation

Robert G. Moyle, Carl H. Oliveros, Michael J. Andersen, Peter A. Hosner, Brett W. Benz, Joseph D. Manthey, Scott L. Travers, Rafe M. Brown & Brant C. Faircloth
Songbirds (oscine passerines) are the most species rich and cosmopolitan bird group, comprising almost half of global avian species diversity. Because of their diversity and ubiquity, songbirds are used extensively in studies of evolutionary ecology, diversification, and ethology. Songbirds originated in Australia, but the evolutionary trajectory from a single species in an isolated continent to worldwide proliferation is poorly understood. Prior research suggested songbird diversification scenarios that are largely uncoupled from Earth history, including extensive...

Data from: Population differentiation of 2 forms of Bryde’s whales in the Indian and Pacific Oceans

Francine Kershaw, Matthew S. Leslie, Tim Collins, Rubaiyat M. Mansur, Brian D. Smith, Gianna Minton, Robert Baldwin, Richard G. LeDuc, R. Charles Anderson, & Howard C. Rosenbaum
Accurate identification of units for conservation is particularly challenging for marine species as obvious barriers to gene flow are generally lacking. Bryde’s whales (Balaenoptera spp.) are subject to multiple human-mediated stressors, including fisheries bycatch, ship strikes, and scientific whaling by Japan. For effective management, a clear understanding of how populations of each Bryde’s whale species/subspecies are genetically structured across their range is required. We conducted a population-level analysis of mtDNA control region sequences with 56...

Data from: Using terrestrial haematophagous leeches to enhance tropical biodiversity monitoring programmes in Bangladesh

Sarah R. Weiskopf, Kyle P. McCarthy, Michael Tessler, Hasan A. Rahman, Jennifer L. McCarthy, Rebecca Hersch, Mohammad M. Faisal & Mark E. Siddall
1. Measuring mammal biodiversity in tropical rainforests is challenging, and methods which reduce effort while maximizing success are crucial for long-term monitoring programmes. Commonly used methods to assess mammal biodiversity may require substantial sampling effort to be effective. Genetic methods are a new and important sampling tool on the horizon, but obtaining sufficient DNA samples can be a challenge. 2. We evaluated the efficacy of using parasitic leeches Haemadipsa spp., as compared to camera trapping,...

Macroevolution of dimensionless life history metrics in tetrapods

Cecina Babich Morrow, S.K. Morgan Ernest & Drew Kerkhoff
Life history traits represent organisms’ strategies to navigate the fitness trade-offs between survival and reproduction. Eric Charnov developed three dimensionless metrics to quantify fundamental life history trade-offs. Lifetime reproductive effort (LRE), relative reproductive lifespan (RRL), and relative offspring size (ROS), together with body mass, can be used to classify life history strategies across the four major classes of tetrapods: amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds. First, we investigate how the metrics have evolved in concert with...

Anatomy of the nasal and auditory regions of the fossil lagomorph Palaeolagus haydeni: systematic and evolutionary implications

Łucja Fostowicz-Frelik, Irina Ruf & Jin Meng
Palaeolagus, a late Eocene to early Miocene North American lagomorph genus, represented by numerous and well-preserved specimens, has been long considered a basal leporid, although it is currently understood as a stem lagomorph. Based on micro-computed tomography (μCT) data and 3D reconstructions, here we present the first description of intracranial structures of the nasal and auditory regions of a complete skull of Palaeolagus haydeni from the early Oligocene of Nebraska. Although Palaeolagus haydeni shows a...

How to render species comparable taxonomic units through deep time: A case study on intraspecific osteological variability in extant and extinct Lacertid lizards

Emanuel Tschopp, James Napoli, Lukardis Wencker, Massimo Delfino & Paul Upchurch
Generally, the species is considered to be the only naturally occurring taxon. However, species recognised and defined using different species delimitation criteria cannot readily be compared, impacting studies of biodiversity through Deep Time. This comparability issue is particularly marked when comparing extant with extinct species, because the only available data for species delimitation in fossils is derived from their preserved morphology, which is generally restricted to osteology in vertebrates. Here, we quantify intraspecific, intrageneric, and...

Data from: Quantifying the completeness of the bat fossil record

Emily E. Brown, Daniel D. Cashmore, Nancy B. Simmons & Richard J. Butler
Bats (Chiroptera) are one of the most successful extant mammalian orders, uniquely capable of powered flight and laryngeal echolocation. The timing and evidence for evolution of their novel adaptations has been difficult to ascertain from the fossil record due to chronological gaps (e.g. during the Palaeocene) and the fragmentary nature of most fossil bat material. Changes in fossil specimen completeness through time and space can bias our understanding of macroevolutionary processes. Here, we quantify the...

Data from: Multiple independent colonizations into the Congo Basin during the continental radiation of African Mastacembelus spiny eels

Julia J. Day, Antonie Fages, Katherine J. Brown, Emmanuel J. Vreven, Melanie L. J. Stiassny, Roger Bills, John P. Friel, Lukas Rüber & Antoine Fages
Aim: There has been recent interest in the origin and assembly of continental biotas based on densely sampled species-level clades, however, studies from African freshwaters are few so that the commonality of macroevolutionary patterns and processes among continental clades remain to be tested. Within the Afrotropics, the Congo Basin contains the highest diversity of riverine fishes, yet it is unclear how this fauna was assembled. To address this, and the diversification dynamics of a continental...

Data from: Worldwide exploration of the microbiome harbored by the cnidarian model, Exaiptasia pallida (Agassiz in Verrill, 1864) indicates a lack of bacterial association specificity at a lower taxonomic rank

Tanya Brown, Christopher Otero, Alejandro Grajales, Estefania Rodriguez & Mauricio Rodriguez-Lanetty
Examination of host-microbe interactions in early diverging metazoans, such as cnidarians, is of great interest from an evolutionary perspective to understand how host-microbial consortia have evolved. To address this problem, we analyzed whether the bacterial community associated with the cosmopolitan and model sea anemone Exaiptasia pallida shows specific patterns across worldwide populations ranging from the Caribbean Sea, and the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. By comparing sequences of the V1–V3 hypervariable regions of the bacterial 16S...

Data from: The biogeography of deep time phylogenetic reticulation

Frank T. Burbrink & Marcelo Gehara
Most phylogenies are typically represented as purely bifurcating. However, as genomic data has become more common in phylogenetic studies, it is not unusual to find reticulation among terminal lineages or among internal nodes (deep time reticulation; DTR). In these situations, gene flow must have happened in the same or adjacent geographic areas for these DTRs to have occurred and therefore biogeographic reconstruction should provide similar area estimates for parental nodes, provided extinction or dispersal has...

Data from: Implied weighting and its utility in palaeontological datasets: a study using modelled phylogenetic matrices

Curtis R. Congreve & James C. Lamsdell
Implied weighting, a method for phylogenetic inference that actively seeks to downweight supposed homoplasy, has in recent years begun to be widely utilized in palaeontological datasets. Given the method's purported ability at handling widespread homoplasy/convergence, we investigate the effects of implied weighting on modelled phylogenetic data. We generated 100 character matrices consisting of 55 characters each using a Markov Chain morphology model of evolution based on a known phylogenetic tree. Rates of character evolution in...

Data from: Host conservatism, geography, and elevation in the evolution of a Neotropical moth radiation

Joshua P. Jahner, Matthew L. Forister, Thomas L. Parchman, Angela M. Smilanich, James S. Miller, Joseph S. Wilson, Thomas R. Walla, Eric J. Tepe, Lora A. Richards, Mario A. Quijano-Abril, Andrea E. Glassmire & Lee A. Dyer
The origins of evolutionary radiations are often traced to the colonization of novel adaptive zones, including unoccupied habitats or unutilized resources. For herbivorous insects, the predominant mechanism of diversification is typically assumed to be a shift onto a novel lineage of host plants. However, other drivers of diversification are important in shaping evolutionary history, especially for groups residing in regions with complex geological histories. We evaluated the contributions of shifts in host plant clade, bioregion,...

Data from: Splitting an ancient icon: mummy DNA resurrects a cryptic Nile crocodile

Evon Hekkala, Matthew H. Shirley, George Amato, James D. Austin, Suellen Charter, John Thorbjarnarson, Kent A. Vliet, Marlys L. Houck, Robert DeSalle & Michael J. Blum
The Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) is an ancient icon of both cultural and scientific interest. The species is emblematic of the great civilizations of the Nile River valley and serves as a model for international wildlife conservation. Despite its familiarity, a centuries-long dispute over the taxonomic status of the Nile crocodile remains unresolved. This dispute not only confounds our understanding of the origins and biogeography of the “true crocodiles” of the crown genus Crocodylus, but...

Data from: Song evolution, speciation, and vocal learning in passerine birds

Nicholas A. Mason, Kevin J. Burns, Joseph A. Tobias, Santiago Claramunt, Nathalie Seddon & Elizabeth Perrault Derryberry
Phenotypic divergence can promote reproductive isolation and speciation, suggesting a possible link between rates of phenotypic evolution and the tempo of speciation at multiple evolutionary scales. To date, most macroevolutionary studies of diversification have focused on morphological traits, whereas behavioral traitsࣧincluding vocal signalsࣧare rarely considered. Thus, although behavioral traits often mediate mate choice and gene flow, we have a limited understanding of how behavioral evolution contributes to diversification. Furthermore, the developmental mode by which behavioral...

Data from: Fossil grebes from the Truckee Formation (Miocene) of Nevada and a new phylogenetic analysis of Podicipediformes (Aves)

Daniel T. Ksepka, Amy M. Balanoff, Michael A. Bell & Michel D. Houseman
Podicipediformes is a cosmopolitan clade of foot-propelled diving birds that, despite inhabiting marine and lacustrine environments, have a poor fossil record. In this contribution, we describe three new grebe fossils from the diatomite beds of the Late Miocene Truckee Formation (10.2 ± 0.2 Ma) of Nevada (USA). Two postcranial skeletons and an associated set of wing elements indicate that at least two distinct grebe species occupied the large, shallow Lake Truckee during the Miocene. Phylogenetic...

Data from: Convergence analysis of a finite element skull model of Herpestes javanicus (Carnivora, Mammalia): implications for robust comparative inferences of biomechanical function

Zhijie Jack Tseng & John J. Flynn
Predictions of skull biomechanical capability based on virtual models constitute a valuable data source for testing hypotheses about craniodental form and feeding behavior. Such comparative analyses also inform dietary reconstruction in extinct species. 3D modeling using Finite Element (FE) methods is a common technique applied to the comparative analysis of craniodental function in extinct and extant vertebrates. However, taxonomically diverse skull models in the literature often are not directly comparable to each other, in part...

Data from: Phylogenomic resolution of scorpions reveals multilevel discordance with morphological phylogenetic signal

Prashant P. Sharma, Rosa Fernández, Lauren A. Esposito, Edmundo González-Santillán, Lionel Monod, E. Gonzalez-Santillan & R. Fernandez
Scorpions represent an iconic lineage of arthropods, historically renowned for their unique bauplan, ancient fossil record and venom potency. Yet, higher level relationships of scorpions, based exclusively on morphology, remain virtually untested, and no multilocus molecular phylogeny has been deployed heretofore towards assessing the basal tree topology. We applied a phylogenomic assessment to resolve scorpion phylogeny, for the first time, to our knowledge, sampling extensive molecular sequence data from all superfamilies and examining basal relationships...

Data from: Resolving a phylogenetic hypothesis for parrots: implications from systematics to conservation

Kaiya L. Provost, Leo Joseph & Brian Tilston Smith
Advances in sequencing technology and phylogenetics have revolutionised avian biology by providing an evolutionary framework for studying natural groupings. In the parrots (Psittaciformes), DNA-based studies have led to a reclassification of clades, yet substantial gaps remain in the data gleaned from genetic information. Here we provide an overview of published genetic data of parrots, characterise sampling depth across the phylogeny, and evaluate support for existing systematic treatments. We inferred a concatenated tree with 307 species...

Data from: ABC inference of multi-population divergence with admixture from unphased population genomic data

John D. Robinson, Lynsey Bunnefeld, Jack Hearn, Graham N. Stone & Michael J. Hickerson
Rapidly developing sequencing technologies and declining costs have made it possible to collect genome-scale data from population-level samples in non-model systems. Inferential tools for historical demography given these datasets are, at present, underdeveloped. In particular, approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) has yet to be widely embraced by researchers generating these data. Here, we demonstrate the promise of ABC for analysis of the large datasets that are now attainable from non-model taxa through current genomic sequencing technologies....

Data from: Linking genetic kinship and demographic analyses to characterize dispersal: methods and application to Blanding’s turtle

Brendan N. Reid, Richard P. Thiel, Per J. Palsbøll & Marcus Z. Peery
Characterizing how frequently, and at what life stages and spatial scales, dispersal occurs can be difficult, especially for species with cryptic juvenile periods and long reproductive life spans. Using a combination of mark–recapture information, microsatellite genetic data, and demographic simulations, we characterize natal and breeding dispersal patterns in the long-lived, slow-maturing, and endangered Blanding’s turtle (Emydoidea blandingii), focusing on nesting females. We captured and genotyped 310 individual Blanding’s turtles (including 220 nesting females) in a...

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