22 Works

Data from: Proteroctopus ribeti in coleoid evolution

Isabelle Kruta, Isabelle Rouget, Sylvain Charbonnier, Jérémie Bardin, Vincent Fernandez, Damien Germain, Arnaud Brayard & Neil Landman
Palaeontological data are key elements for inferring ancestral character states and the assembly of character complexes, but cephalopod fossils preserving soft tissues are very rare. The exceptionally well-preserved, unique specimen of Jurassic Proteroctopus ribeti Fischer & Riou from the Lagerstätte of La-Voulte-sur-Rhône (c. 165 Ma, France) is one of the few fossil octopod related taxa, but is rarely considered in evolutionary studies. In this paper, we used synchrotron microtomography to reappraise its external characters and...

Data from: Archaeogenomic evidence reveals prehistoric matrilineal dynasty

Douglas J. Kennett, Stephen Plog, Richard J. George, Brendan J. Culleton, Adam S. Watson, Pontus Skoglund, Nadin Rohland, Swapan Mallick, Kristin Stewardson, Logan Kistler, Steven A. LeBlanc, Peter M. Whiteley, David Reich & George H. Perry
For societies with writing systems, hereditary leadership is documented as one of the hallmarks of early political complexity and governance. In contrast, it is unknown whether hereditary succession played a role in the early formation of prehistoric complex societies that lacked writing. Here we use an archaeogenomic approach to identify an elite matriline that persisted between 800 and 1130 CE in Chaco Canyon, the centre of an expansive prehistoric complex society in the Southwestern United...

Data from: How many more? Sample size determination in studies of morphological integration and evolvability

Mark Grabowski & Arthur Porto
The variational properties of living organisms are an important component of current evolutionary theory. As a consequence, researchers working on the field of multivariate evolution have increasingly used integration and evolvability statistics as a way of capturing the potentially complex patterns of trait association and their effects over evolutionary trajectories. Little attention has been paid, however, to the cascading effects that inaccurate estimates of trait covariance have on these widely used evolutionary statistics. Here, we...

Data from: Laetoli footprints reveal bipedal gait biomechanics different from those of modern humans and chimpanzees

Kevin G. Hatala, Brigitte Demes & Brian G. Richmond
Bipedalism is a key adaptation that shaped human evolution, yet the timing and nature of its evolution remain unclear. Here we use new experimentally based approaches to investigate the locomotor mechanics preserved by the famous Pliocene hominin footprints from Laetoli, Tanzania. We conducted footprint formation experiments with habitually barefoot humans and with chimpanzees to quantitatively compare their footprints to those preserved at Laetoli. Our results show that the Laetoli footprints are morphologically distinct from those...

Data from: From success to persistence: Identifying an evolutionary regime shift in the diverse Paleozoic aquatic arthropod group Eurypterida, driven by the Devonian biotic crisis

James C. Lamsdell & Paul A. Selden
Mass extinctions have altered the trajectory of evolution a number of times over the Phanerozoic. During these periods of biotic upheaval a different selective regime appears to operate, although it is still unclear whether consistent survivorship rules apply across different extinction events. We compare variations in diversity and disparity across the evolutionary history of a major Paleozoic arthropod group, the Eurypterida. Using these data, we explore the group's transition from a successful, dynamic clade to...

Data from: Genetic diversity and population structure of Mesoamerican jaguars (Panthera onca): implications for conservation and management

Claudia Wultsch, Anthony Caragiulo, Isabela Dias-Freedman, Howard Quigley, Salisa Rabinowitz & George Amato
Mesoamerican jaguars (Panthera onca) have been extirpated from over 77% of their historic range, inhabiting fragmented landscapes at potentially reduced population sizes. Maintaining and restoring genetic diversity and connectivity across human-altered landscapes has become a major conservation priority; nonetheless large-scale genetic monitoring of natural populations is rare. This is the first regional conservation genetic study of jaguars to primarily use fecal samples collected in the wild across five Mesoamerican countries: Belize, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras,...

Data from: Tectonic collision and uplift of Wallacea triggered the global songbird radiation

Robert G. Moyle, Carl H. Oliveros, Michael J. Andersen, Peter A. Hosner, Brett W. Benz, Joseph D. Manthey, Scott L. Travers, Rafe M. Brown & Brant C. Faircloth
Songbirds (oscine passerines) are the most species rich and cosmopolitan bird group, comprising almost half of global avian species diversity. Because of their diversity and ubiquity, songbirds are used extensively in studies of evolutionary ecology, diversification, and ethology. Songbirds originated in Australia, but the evolutionary trajectory from a single species in an isolated continent to worldwide proliferation is poorly understood. Prior research suggested songbird diversification scenarios that are largely uncoupled from Earth history, including extensive...

Data from: Linking genetic kinship and demographic analyses to characterize dispersal: methods and application to Blanding’s turtle

Brendan N. Reid, Richard P. Thiel, Per J. Palsbøll & Marcus Z. Peery
Characterizing how frequently, and at what life stages and spatial scales, dispersal occurs can be difficult, especially for species with cryptic juvenile periods and long reproductive life spans. Using a combination of mark–recapture information, microsatellite genetic data, and demographic simulations, we characterize natal and breeding dispersal patterns in the long-lived, slow-maturing, and endangered Blanding’s turtle (Emydoidea blandingii), focusing on nesting females. We captured and genotyped 310 individual Blanding’s turtles (including 220 nesting females) in a...

Data from: Implied weighting and its utility in palaeontological datasets: a study using modelled phylogenetic matrices

Curtis R. Congreve & James C. Lamsdell
Implied weighting, a method for phylogenetic inference that actively seeks to downweight supposed homoplasy, has in recent years begun to be widely utilized in palaeontological datasets. Given the method's purported ability at handling widespread homoplasy/convergence, we investigate the effects of implied weighting on modelled phylogenetic data. We generated 100 character matrices consisting of 55 characters each using a Markov Chain morphology model of evolution based on a known phylogenetic tree. Rates of character evolution in...

Data from: Song evolution, speciation, and vocal learning in passerine birds

Nicholas A. Mason, Kevin J. Burns, Joseph A. Tobias, Santiago Claramunt, Nathalie Seddon & Elizabeth Perrault Derryberry
Phenotypic divergence can promote reproductive isolation and speciation, suggesting a possible link between rates of phenotypic evolution and the tempo of speciation at multiple evolutionary scales. To date, most macroevolutionary studies of diversification have focused on morphological traits, whereas behavioral traitsࣧincluding vocal signalsࣧare rarely considered. Thus, although behavioral traits often mediate mate choice and gene flow, we have a limited understanding of how behavioral evolution contributes to diversification. Furthermore, the developmental mode by which behavioral...

Data from: Asynchronous demographic responses to Pleistocene climate change in Eastern Nearctic vertebrates

Frank T. Burbrink, Yvonne L. Chan, Edwards A. Myers, Sara Ruane, Brian T. Smith & Michael J. Hickerson
Pleistocene climatic cycles altered species distributions in the Eastern Nearctic of North America, yet the degree of congruent demographic response to the Pleistocene among codistributed taxa remains unknown. We use a hierarchical approximate Bayesian computational approach to test if population sizes across lineages of snakes, lizards, turtles, mammals, birds, salamanders and frogs in this region expanded synchronously to Late Pleistocene climate changes. Expansion occurred in 75% of 74 lineages, and of these, population size trajectories...

Data from: A unique feeding strategy of the extinct marine mammal Kolponomos: convergence on sabretooths and sea otters

Z. Jack Tseng, Camille Grohé & John J. Flynn
Mammalian molluscivores feed mainly by shell-crushing or suction-feeding. The extinct marine arctoid, Kolponomos, has been interpreted as an otter-like shell-crusher based on similar dentitions. However, neither the masticatory biomechanics of the shell-crushing adaptation, nor the way Kolponomos may have captured hard-shelled prey, have been tested. Based on mandibular symphyseal morphology shared by Kolponomos and sabretoothed carnivores, we hypothesize a sabretooth-like mechanism for Kolponomos prey-capture, whereby the mandible functioned as an anchor. Torque generated from jaw...

Data from: Behavioral response to song and genetic divergence in two subspecies of white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys)

Sara E. Lipshutz, Isaac A. Overcast, Michael J. Hickerson, Robb T. Brumfield & Elizabeth P. Derryberry
Divergence in sexual signals may drive reproductive isolation between lineages, but behavioral barriers can weaken in contact zones. Here, we investigate the role of song as a behavioral and genetic barrier in a contact zone between two subspecies of white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys). We employed a reduced genomic dataset to assess population structure and infer the history underlying divergence, gene flow and hybridization. We also measured divergence in song and tested behavioral responses to song...

Data from: What shapes cerambycid beetle communities in a tropical forest mosaic? Assessing the effects of host tree identity, forest structure, and vertical stratification

Lin Li, Reinaldo Aguilar & Amy Berkov
Due to anthropogenic activities, tropical rain forests face many challenges in sustaining biodiversity and maintaining global climates. This study explores how forest successional stage, tree composition, and stratum affect communities of saproxylic cerambycid beetles—concealed feeders that play important roles in forest nutrient cycling. Forty trees in five families (Fabaceae, Lecythidaceae, Malvaceae, Moraceae, and Sapotaceae) were sampled in a mosaic of old-growth and secondary forest on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. Bait branches yielded 3549 cerambycid...

Data from: Genome-wide SNP data reveal cryptic phylogeographic structure and microallopatric divergence in a rapids-adapted clade of cichlids from the Congo River

S. Elizabeth Alter, Jason Munshi-South & M.L.J. Stiassny
The lower Congo River (LCR) is a freshwater biodiversity hotspot in Africa characterized by some of the world's largest rapids. However, little is known about the evolutionary forces shaping this diversity, which include numerous endemic fishes. We investigated phylogeographic relationships in Teleogramma, a small clade of rheophilic cichlids, in the context of regional geography and hydrology. Previous studies have been unable to resolve phylogenetic relationships within Teleogramma due to lack of variation in nuclear genes...

Data from: Complex longitudinal diversification across South China and Vietnam in Stejneger's pit viper, Viridovipera stejnegeri (Schmidt, 1925) (Reptilia: Serpentes: Viperidae)

Peng Guo, Qin Liu, Fei Zhu, Guang H. Zhong, Xin Chen, Edward A. Myers, Jing Che, Liang Zhang, Thomas Ziegler, Truong Q. Nguyen & Frank T. Burbrink
Viridovipera stejnegeri is one of the most common pit vipers in Asia, with a wide distribution in southern China and Vietnam. We investigated historical demography and explored how the environment and climatic factors have shaped genetic diversity and the evolutionary history of this venomous snake. A total of 171 samples from 47 localities were sequenced and analysed for two mitochondrial gene fragments and three nuclear genes. Gene trees reveal the existence of two well-supported clades...

Data from: Whence the beardogs? Reappraisal of the Middle to Late Eocene ‘Miacis’ from Texas, USA, and the origin of Amphicyonidae (Mammalia, Carnivora)

Susumu Tomiya & Zhijie Jack Tseng
The Middle to Late Eocene sediments of Texas have yielded a wealth of fossil material that offers a rare window on a diverse and highly endemic mammalian fauna from that time in the southern part of North America. These faunal data are particularly significant because the narrative of mammalian evolution in the Paleogene of North America has traditionally been dominated by taxa that are known from higher latitudes, primarily in the Rocky Mountain and northern...

Data from: Asynchronous diversification of snakes in the North American warm deserts

Edward A. Myers, Michael J. Hickerson & Frank T. Burbrink
Aim: We quantify the degree to which co-distributed snakes across the Cochise Filter Barrier (CFB) have a shared history of population divergence and estimate the timing of divergence for each taxon pair. Location: North America. Methods: A single locus dataset was collected (n = 747 individuals) for 12 snake taxon pairs. Phylogeographical structure was estimated for each taxon. Redundancy analyses were used to assess the importance of geographical distance, climate and putative barriers to gene...

Data from: Phylogeny and new taxonomy of the Booted Eagles (Accipitriformes: Aquilinae)

Heather R. L. Lerner, Les Christidis, Anita Gamauf, Carole Griffiths, Elisabeth Haring, Christopher J. Huddleston, Sonia Kabra, Annett Kocum, Meade Krosby, Kirsti Kvaloy, David Mindell, Pamela Rasmussen, Nils Rov, Rachel Wadleigh, Michael Wink & Jan Ove Gjershaug
We present a phylogeny of all booted eagles (38 extant and one extinct species) based on analysis of published sequences from seven loci. We find molecular support for five major clades within the booted eagles: Nisaetus (10 species), Spizaetus (4 species), Clanga (3 species), Hieraaetus (6 species) and Aquila (11 species), requiring generic changes for 14 taxa. Additionally, we recommend that the Long-crested Eagle (Lophaetus occipitalis) and the Black Eagle (Ictinaetus malaiensis) remain in their...

Data from: Mutations in different pigmentation genes are associated with parallel melanism in island flycatchers

J. Albert C. Uy, Elizabeth A. Cooper, Stephen Cutie, Moira R. Concannon, Jelmer W. Poelstra, Robert G. Moyle & Christopher E. Filardi
The independent evolution of similar traits across multiple taxa provides some of the most compelling evidence of natural selection. Little is known, however, about the genetic basis of these convergent or parallel traits: are they mediated by identical or different mutations in the same genes, or unique mutations in different genes? Using a combination of candidate gene and reduced representation genomic sequencing approaches, we explore the genetic basis of and the evolutionary processes that mediate...

Data from: Constraints on geographic variation in fiddler crabs (Ocypodidae: Uca) from the western Atlantic

Melanie J. Hopkins, Annat Haber & Carl L Thurman
A key question in evolutionary biology is how intraspecific variation biases the evolution of a population and its divergence from other populations. Such constraints potentially limit the extent to which populations respond to selection, but may endure long enough to have macroevolutionary consequences. Previous studies have focused on the association between covariation patterns and divergence among isolated populations. Few have focused on geographic variation among semi-connected populations, however, even though this may be indicative of...

Data from: Does aquatic foraging impact head shape evolution in snakes?

Marion Segall, Raphaël Cornette, Anne-Claire Fabre, Ramiro Godoy-Diana & Anthony Herrel
Evolutionary trajectories are often biased by developmental and historical factors. However, environmental factors can also impose constraints on the evolutionary trajectories of organisms leading to convergence of morphology in similar ecological contexts. The physical properties of water impose strong constraints on aquatic feeding animals by generating pressure waves that can alert prey and potentially push them away from the mouth. These hydrodynamic constraints have resulted in the independent evolution of suction feeding in most groups...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    22

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    22

Affiliations

  • American Museum of Natural History
    22
  • City University of New York
    5
  • Queens College, CUNY
    4
  • University of Kansas
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Louisiana State University of Alexandria
    2
  • Tulane University
    2
  • Louisiana State University
    2
  • Southern Cross University
    1
  • University of Washington
    1