42 Works

Visualizing active viral infection reveals diverse cell fates in synchronized algal bloom demise

Flora Vincent, Uri Sheyn, Daniella Schatz, Ziv Porat & Assaf Vardi
Marine viruses are the most abundant biological entity in the ocean and are considered as major evolutionary drivers of microbial life (Suttle, 2007). Yet, we lack quantitative approaches to assess their impact on the marine ecosystem. Here, we provide quantification of active viral infection in the bloom forming single celled phytoplankton Emiliania huxleyi infected by the large virus EhV, using high-throughput single molecule mRNA in situ hybridization of both virus and host transcripts. In natural...

Data from: Size, age, and habitat determine effectiveness of Palau's Marine Protected Areas

Alan M. Friedlander, Yimnang Golbuu, Enric Ballesteros, Jennifer E. Caselle, Marine Gouezo, Dawnette Olsudong & Enric Sala
Palau has a rich heritage of conservation that has evolved from the traditional moratoria on fishing, or "bul", to more western Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), while still retaining elements of customary management and tenure. In 2003, the Palau Protected Areas Network (PAN) was created to conserve Palau's unique biodiversity and culture, and is the country's mechanism for achieving the goals of the Micronesia Challenge (MC), an initiative to conserve ?30% of near-shore marine resources within...

Data from: Unexpected high vulnerability of functions in wilderness areas: evidence from coral reef fishes

Stephanie D'agata, Laurent Vigliola, Nickolas A.J. Graham, Laurent Wantiez, Valeriano Parravicini, Sébastien Villéger, Gérard Mou-Tham, Phillipe Frolla, Alan M. Friedlander, Michel Kulbicki, David Mouillot & Nicholas A. J. Graham
High species richness is thought to support the delivery of multiple ecosystem functions and services under changing environments. Yet, some species might perform unique functional roles while others are redundant. Thus, the benefits of high species richness in maintaining ecosystem functioning are uncertain if functions have little redundancy, potentially leading to high vulnerability of functions. We studied the natural propensity of assemblages to be functionally buffered against loss prior to fishing activities, using functional trait...

Data from: Adaptive evolution in locomotor performance: how selective pressures and functional relationships produce diversity

Jeffrey Aaron Scales, Marguerite Butler & Marguerite A. Butler
Despite the complexity of nature, most comparative studies of phenotypic evolution consider selective pressures in isolation. When competing pressures operate on the same system, it is commonly expected that trade-offs will occur that will limit the evolution of phenotypic diversity, however, it is possible that interactions amongst selective pressures may promote diversity instead. We explored the evolution of locomotor performance in lizards in relation to possible selective pressures using the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Here, we show...

Climatology of Solomon Sea currents, temperature and salinity measured by glider

William S. Kessler & Hristina G. Hristova
The Solomon Sea carries the equatorward western boundary current of the South Pacific, a principal pathway of subtropical-equatorial communication. This climatological Solomon Sea velocity dataset is derived from more than a decade of Spray glider missions in the Solomon Sea providing measurements of temperature, salinity and vertically-averaged over the dive-depth horizontal velocity. Only the segments of glider missions making complete transects between Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Solomon Islands (SOL) are considered. All data...

Data from: Mapping migration in a songbird using high-resolution genetic markers

Kristen Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson, Kristina L. Paxton, Vanessa Apkenas, Sirena Lao, Rodney B. Siegel, David F. DeSante, Frank Moore, Thomas B. Smith & Kristen C. Ruegg
Neotropical migratory birds are declining across the Western Hemisphere, but conservation efforts have been hampered by the inability to assess where migrants are most limited – the breeding grounds, migratory stopover sites, or wintering areas. A major challenge has been the lack of an efficient, reliable, and broadly applicable method for measuring the strength of migratory connections between populations across the annual cycle. Here we show how high-resolution genetic markers can be used to identify...

Wallacean and Melanesian islands promote higher rates of diversification within the global passerine radiation Corvides: Supplementary information

Jenna McCullough, Carl Oliveros, Brett Benz, Rosana Zenil-Ferguson, Joel Cracraft, Robert Moyle & Michael Andersen
The complex island archipelagoes of Wallacea and Melanesia have provided empirical data behind integral theories in evolutionary biology, including allopatric speciation and island biogeography. Yet, questions regarding the relative impact of the layered biogeographic barriers, such as deep-water trenches and isolated island systems, on faunal diversification remain underexplored. One such barrier is Wallace’s Line, a significant biogeographic boundary that largely separates Australian and Asian biodiversity. To assess the relative roles of biogeographic barriers—specifically isolated island...

Global Ocean particulate organic phosphorus, carbon, oxygen for respiration, and nitrogen (GO-POPCORN) data from Bio-GO-SHIP cruises

Tatsuro Tanioka, Alyse Larkin, Allison Moreno, Catherine Garcia, Nathan Garcia, Jenna Lee, Adam Fagan, Melissa Brock, Skylar Gerace, Adam Martiny & Michael Lomas
Here, we present the Global Ocean Particulate Organic Phosphorus, Carbon, Oxygen for Respiration, and Nitrogen (GO-POPCORN) dataset from recent Bio-GO-SHIP cruises between 2011 and 2020. The dataset contains 2109 paired measurements of particulate organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus from 70°S to 55°N across all major ocean basins. The dataset also includes 933 measurements of oxygen demand for organic carbon respiration. This new dataset is valuable for improving our understanding of how biological elemental stoichiometry plays...

Data from: Non-native insects dominate daytime pollination in a high-elevation Hawaiian dryland ecosystem

Clare E. Aslan, Aaron B. Shiels, William Haines & Christina T. Liang
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Over one-third of the native flowering plant species in the Hawaiian Islands are listed as federally Threatened or Endangered. Lack of sufficient pollination could contribute to reductions in populations, reproduction, and genetic diversity among these species, but has been little studied. METHODS: We used systematic observations and manual flower treatments to quantify flower visitation and outcrossing dependency of eight native (including four Endangered) plant species in a dryland ecosystem in Hawaii:...

Data from: DNA barcoding provides support for a cryptic species complex within the globally distributed and fishery important opah (Lampris guttatus)

John R. Hyde, Karen E. Underkoffler & Meagan A. Sundberg
The cornerstone of fisheries management relies on a solid taxonomic base and an understanding of how animals can be grouped into coherent management units. Surprisingly little is known about the basic biology and ecology of opah (Lampris guttatus), a globally distributed species that is commercially exploited and regionally common in the North Pacific. Recent efforts to collect life history data on this species uncovered evidence of two North Pacific morphotypes. Sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome...

Data from: Density drives polyandry and relatedness influences paternal success in the Pacific gooseneck barnacle, Pollicipes elegans

Louis V. Plough, Amy Moran & Peter Marko
Background: Polyandry is a common mating strategy in animals, increasing female fitness through direct (material) and indirect (genetic) benefits. Most theories about the benefits of polyandry come from studies of terrestrial animals, which have relatively complex mating systems and behaviors; less is known about the potential benefits of polyandry in sessile marine animals, for which potential mates may be scarce and females have less control over pre-copulatory mate choice. Here, we used microsatellite markers to...

Data from: Depth specialization in mesophotic corals (Leptoseris spp.) and associated algal symbionts in Hawai‘i

Xavier Pochon, Zac H. Forsman, Heather L. Spalding, Jacqueline L. Padilla-Gamino, Celia M. Smith & Ruth D. Gates
Corals at the lower limits of mesophotic habitats are likely to have unique photosynthetic adaptations that allow them to persist and dominate in these extreme low light ecosystems. We examined the host–symbiont relationships from the dominant coral genus Leptoseris in mesophotic environments from Hawai'i collected by submersibles across a depth gradient of 65–125 m. Coral and Symbiodinium genotypes were compared with three distinct molecular markers including coral (COX1–1-rRNA intron) and Symbiodinium (COI) mitochondrial markers and...

Data from: The Hawaiian freshwater algae biodiversity survey (2009-2014): systematic and biogeographic trends with an emphasis on the macroalgae

Alison R. Sherwood, Amy L. Carlile, Jessica M. Neumann, J. Patrick Kociolek, Jeffrey R. Johansen, Rex L. Lowe, Kimberly Y. Conklin & Gernot G. Presting
Background A remarkable range of environmental conditions is present in the Hawaiian Islands due to their gradients of elevation, rainfall and island age. Despite being well known as a location for the study of evolutionary processes and island biogeography, little is known about the composition of the non-marine algal flora of the archipelago, its degree of endemism, or affinities with other floras. We conducted a biodiversity survey of the non-marine macroalgae of the six largest...

Horizontal Stirring over the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf: the Spatial and Temporal Evolution of Surface Eddy Kinetic Energy

Kirincich Anthony R., Pierre J. Flament, Victoria Futch & Benjamin A. Hodges

Data from: Ocean acidification influences host DNA methylation and phenotypic plasticity in environmentally susceptible corals

Hollie M. Putnam, Jennifer M. Davidson & Ruth D. Gates
As climate change challenges organismal fitness by creating a phenotype–environment mismatch, phenotypic plasticity generated by epigenetic mechanisms (e.g., DNA methylation) can provide a temporal buffer for genetic adaptation. Epigenetic mechanisms may be crucial for sessile benthic marine organisms, such as reef-building corals, where ocean acidification (OA) and warming reflect in strong negative responses. We tested the potential for scleractinian corals to exhibit phenotypic plasticity associated with a change in DNA methylation in response to OA....

Adaptation across geographic ranges is consistent with strong selection in marginal climates and legacies of range expansion

Megan Bontrager, Takuji Usui, Julie Lee-Yaw, Daniel Anstett, Haley Branch, Anna Hargreaves, Christopher Muir & Amy Angert
Every species experiences limits to its geographic distribution. Some evolutionary models predict that populations at range edges are less well-adapted to their local environments due to drift, expansion load, or swamping gene flow from the range interior. Alternatively, populations near range edges might be uniquely adapted to marginal environments. In this study, we use a database of transplant studies that quantify performance at broad geographic scales to test how local adaptation, site quality, and population...

Data from: Going where traditional markers have not gone before: utility of and promise for RAD-sequencing in marine invertebrate phylogeography and population genomics

Adam M. Reitzel, Santiago Herrera, Michael J. Layden, Mark Q. Martindale & Timothy M. Shank
Characterization of large numbers of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) throughout a genome has the power to refine the understanding of population demographic history and to identify genomic regions under selection in natural populations. To this end, population genomic approaches that harness the power of next-generation sequencing to understand the ecology and evolution of marine invertebrates represent a boon to test long-standing questions in marine biology and conservation. We employed restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) to identify SNPs...

Data from: Strong trans-Pacific break and local conservation units in the Galapagos shark (Carcharhinus galapagensis) revealed by genome-wide cytonuclear markers

Diana A. Pazmiño, Gregory E. Maes, Madeline E. Green, Colin A. Simpfendorfer, Mauricio Hoyos-Padilla, Clinton J.A. Duffy, Carl G. Meyer, Sven E. Kerwath, Pelayo Salinas-De-León & Lynne Van Herwerden
The application of genome-wide cytonuclear molecular data to identify management and adaptive units at various spatio-temporal levels is particularly important for overharvested large predatory organisms, often characterized by smaller, localized populations. Despite being “near threatened”, current understanding of habitat use and population structure of Carcharhinus galapagensis is limited to specific areas within its distribution. We evaluated population structure and connectivity across the Pacific Ocean using genome-wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (~7200 SNPs) and mitochondrial Control Region...

Data from: Legume abundance along successional and rainfall gradients in neotropical forests

Maga Gei, Danaë M. A. Rozendaal, Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, Janet I. Sprent, Mira D. Garner, T. Mitchell Aide, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Pedro H.S. Brancalion, George A. L. Cabral, Ricardo Gomes César, Robin L. Chazdon, Rebecca J. Cole, Gabriel Dalla Colletta, Ben De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan Manuel Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mário Marcos Do Espírito Santo, G. Wilson Fernandes, Yule Roberta Ferreira Nunes … & Jennifer S. Powers
The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen (N)-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of forest-inventory plots from a network of 42 Neotropical forest chronosequences. During the first three decades of natural forest regeneration, legume basal area...

Data from: Artificial bat roosts did not accelerate forest regeneration in abandoned pastures in southern Costa Rica

J. Leighton Reid, Ellen K. Holste & Rakan A. Zahawi
Artificial roosts have been proposed as a tool for augmenting bat populations and catalyzing tropical forest regeneration. In the best case scenario, roosts would attract seed-carrying bats (Family Phyllostomidae) into degraded pastures and form nucleating patches of native vegetation. We tested this scenario by monitoring 48 artificial roosts in pastures and adjacent forest fragments in southern Costa Rica over 2 years. Half of the pasture roosts were exposed to direct sunlight and half were affixed...

Data from: Midwater zooplankton and suspended particle dynamics in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre: a stable isotope perspective

Cecelia C. S. Hannides, Brian N. Popp, C. Anela Choy & Jeffrey C. Drazen
We used amino acid (AA) compound-specific isotope analysis (δ15NAA and δ13CAA values) of midwater zooplankton and suspended particles to examine their dynamics in the mesopelagic zone. Suspended particle δ15NAA values increased by up to 14‰ with depth, whereas particle trophic status (measured as trophic position, TP) remained constant at 1.6 ± 0.07. Applying a Rayleigh distillation model to these results gave an observed kinetic isotope fractionation of 5.7 ± 0.4‰, similar to that previously measured...

Data from: Signatures of divergence, invasiveness and terrestralization revealed by four apple snail genomes

Jin Sun, Huawei Mu, Jack C. H. Ip, Runsheng Li, Ting Xu, Alice Accorsi, Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado, Eric Ross, Yi Lan, Yanan Sun, Alfredo Castro-Vazquez, Israel A. Vega, Horacio Heras, Santiago Ituarte, Bert Van Bocxlaer, Kenneth A. Hayes, Robert H. Cowie, Zhongying Zhao, Yu Zhang, Pei-Yuan Qian & Jian-Wen Qiu
The family Ampullariidae includes both aquatic and amphibious apple snails. They are an emerging model for evolutionary studies due to the high diversity, ancient history and wide geographical distribution. Insight into drivers of ampullariid evolution is hampered, however, by the lack of genomic resources. Here we report the genomes of four ampullariids spanning the Old World (Lanistes nyassanus) and New World (Pomacea canaliculata, Pomacea maculata and Marisa cornuarietis) clades. The ampullariid genomes have conserved ancient...

Data from: Global honey bee viral landscape altered by a parasitic mite

Stephen J. Martin, Andrea C. Highfield, Laura Brettell, Ethel M. Villalobos, Giles E. Budge, Michelle Powell, Scott Nikaido & Declan C. Schroeder
Emerging diseases are among the greatest threats to honey bees. Unfortunately, where and when an emerging disease will appear are almost impossible to predict. The arrival of the parasitic Varroa mite into the Hawaiian honey bee population allowed us to investigate changes in the prevalence, load, and strain diversity of honey bee viruses. The mite increased the prevalence of a single viral species, deformed wing virus (DWV), from ~10 to 100% within honey bee populations,...

Speciation in the abyss - genomics and morphology reveal a new species of beaked whale

Emma L. Carroll, Michael R. McGowen, Morgan L. McCarthy, Felix G. Marx, Natacha Aguilar De Soto, Merel L. Dalebout, Sascha Dreyer, Oscar E. Gaggiotti, Sabine S. Hansen, Anton Van Helden, Aubrie B. Onoufriou, Robin W. Baird, C. Scott Baker, Simon Berrow, Danielle Cholewiak, Diane Claridge, Rochelle Constantine, Nicholas J. Davison, Catarina Eira, R. Ewan Fordyce, John Gatesy, G. J. Greg Hofmeyr, Vidal Martin, James G. Mead, Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni … & Morten T. Olsen
Earth’s deep oceans remains less well understood than the surface of Mars. Beaked whales (ziphiids) are among the most visible inhabitants of the abyss, due to their large size and worldwide distribution, yet their diversity and ecology remain obscure. We combine genomic and morphometric analyses to reveal a new Southern Hemisphere ziphiid species, Ramari’s beaked whale, Mesoplodon eueu, whose name is linked to the Indigenous people of the lands from which the species holotype and...

Data from: Habitat-based species distribution modelling of the Hawaiian deepwater snapper-grouper complex

Zack. S. Oyafuso, Jeffrey C. Drazen, Cordelia H. Moore & Erik C. Franklin
Deepwater snappers and groupers are valuable components of many subtropical and tropical fisheries globally and understanding the habitat associations of these species is important for spatial fisheries management. Habitat-based species distribution models were developed for the deepwater snapper-grouper complex in the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI). Six eteline snappers (Pristipomoides spp., Aphareus rutilans, and Etelis spp.) and one endemic grouper (Hyporthodus quernus) comprise the species complex known as the Hawaiian Deep Seven Bottomfishes. Species occurrence was...

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